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  1. #1
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    Default Tilting at Windmills - Feb 20, 2014

    Brian Hibbs' annual analysis of the sales numbers for graphic novels in the bookstore market finds some new entries in 2013.


    Full article here.

  2. #2
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    In the very first chart you say that sales are up yet the figures show sales as down.

    Year Total Units Growth Total Dollars Growth
    2012 5,696,163 -4.53% $89,918,354 12.45%
    2013 5,654,351 3.97% $96,062,709 6.83%

    2013's 5,654,351 is lower sales than 2012's 5,696,163 not higher as stated right after the chart.

  3. #3

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    My take: Robert Kirkman is a very wealthy man

  4. #4
    Senior Member Trey's Avatar
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    manga sales are down because nobody really needs 26 volumes of the same story.

    Unless its Batman
    "Calm down, call Batman." - Greg Capullo

  5. #5

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    It's more pronounced since they're only two volumes, but what you say about PERSEPOLIS and MAUS applies to most multi-volume works. SANDMAN drops almost exactly half its over 16,000 for v1 PRELUDES to v2 DOLLS HOUSE down to under 3,000 for v10 THE WAKE (with v9 THE KINDLY ONES not even charting in the top 750). And that's with v2 and v10 being in most respects superior books. The worst selling WALKING DEAD sells about 14% of v1. FABLES falls quickly off the top 750 (except for the new volumes), so it's not holding most of those 7,000 sales of v1. Only the first volumes of Y THE LAST MAN in two formats are on the charts, so I'm sure by the last volumes those its down below 20% of the first books. BONE holds up through the series pretty well by comparison, but even that's only selling 30% to 50% of v1 sales for most later volumes. Seems you can expect a 40%+ dropoff from v1 to v2 for most series, and a more gradual tapering off from there to the end.

    Anyway, fascinating stuff. It's good to see something else from Image break through. If it weren't for SAGA doing well, WALKING DEAD would be something like 97% of their sales in the top 750, instead of just 90%. Be interesting to see if any of their high profile launches this year can get that kind of traction.

    And of course Marvel might seem to be struggling, but I'm sure they'll tell you they're exceeding their targets, getting a good ROI by keeping their net inventory costs low. Look, they sold over 3500 copies of WOLVERINE BY CLAREMONT AND MILLER in a year when a movie was based on that book. If that's not success, I don't want to know what is.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by kumagawa View Post
    In the very first chart you say that sales are up yet the figures show sales as down.

    Year Total Units Growth Total Dollars Growth
    2012 5,696,163 -4.53% $89,918,354 12.45%
    2013 5,654,351 3.97% $96,062,709 6.83%

    2013's 5,654,351 is lower sales than 2012's 5,696,163 not higher as stated right after the chart.
    I think he wrote the wrong total number in 2012, as it is exactly the same number as 2011 when it should have been a number that was 4.53% lower than 2011.

  7. #7
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    The decline of manga in the bookscan rankings may have as much to do with the migration of the biggest publisher (Viz) into the digital market in 2010, though the initial decline started before that. Comparison of the Viz emanga weekly top 10 and the NYT Manga top 10 reveals that the former has a much higher rate of turnover/introduction of new titles, on par with that of the $5 billion Japanese manga industry:

    http://animetics.net/2014/01/17/fun-...manga-markets/

    That alone could mean several things other than a strong digital market (eg. lower sales thresholds or early buying thanks to ease of access), but it's not the only bit of evidence. While the bookscan print manga totals for 2011 only added up to about $63 million, a Viz executive was quoted as saying that the manga industry in North America was worth $120 million that same year. Even with bookscan's tendency to underestimate, it would have to have been off by a factor of 2 to not give digital manga a significant share of the credit in the decline of the print industry in the US.

    By the by, does anyone know what happened to the data from 2003-2006? I'd dearly like to get my hands on it, but the links seem to be broken (so is the 2007 link, but I found that in another article).

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by kumagawa View Post
    In the very first chart you say that sales are up yet the figures show sales as down.

    Year Total Units Growth Total Dollars Growth
    2012 5,696,163 -4.53% $89,918,354 12.45%
    2013 5,654,351 3.97% $96,062,709 6.83%

    2013's 5,654,351 is lower sales than 2012's 5,696,163 not higher as stated right after the chart.
    I have NO idea how this happened, because it is correct in the Word doc I sent CBR to post.

    The correct 2012 total is 5,438,329. The 2013 figure is correct.

    -B

  9. #9
    Dazed and Confused Badou's Avatar
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    The fall of the manga market can be directly tied to the rise of manga piracy and scanlation sites. These aggregate scan sties started up around 2006-2007 and over the years quickly garnered a lot of traffic spawning even more aggregate sites like a virus. Now you google a name of a series or a chapter and are linked to over have a dozen of these sties on the first page alone. That added with things like the fact that anime on American television is nowhere near as prevalent as it was in the early 2000s doesn't help grow a market.

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