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  1. #1
    Mild-Mannered Reporter
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    Default THE COLOR BARRIER: A Message of Comics, Diversity & Hope

    Joseph Illidge joins CBR during Black History Month for THE COLOR BARRIER, a series on diversity in comics accompanied by a message of hope.


    Full article here.

  2. #2

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    Nice article. I think the thing that is missed ( even in my ramblings) is that minorities LOVE the medium too. And most of my frustration comes when it seems the medium doesn't love me back as much as I love it. Granted things have changed for the better creatively..but the power structure seems to stay the same. Minorities have to constantly prove they belong..and how can that happen when you are given half a chance.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by RolandJP View Post
    Nice article. I think the thing that is missed ( even in my ramblings) is that minorities LOVE the medium too. And most of my frustration comes when it seems the medium doesn't love me back as much as I love it. Granted things have changed for the better creatively..but the power structure seems to stay the same. Minorities have to constantly prove they belong..and how can that happen when you are given half a chance.
    If you're interested in what a lot of the folks on the indie side are up to, we made a (constantly) growing list of Black-produced indie graphic novels and series. Check it out whenever you get the chance:

    http://foolscrusade.blogspot.com/201...ced-indie.html

    Otherwise, we're out here and we're making stuff. Things will change in time. We just have to move one step at a time.

    :)

    BME
    WRITING FOR ROOKIES - One of the few, if not only, podcasts dedicated to the aspiring sci-fi and comic book writer.
    http://writingforrookies.podcastpeople.com/

  4. #4
    Psychological violence Moose100's Avatar
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    Very good introductory article! I look forward to the discussions in the near future.

  5. #5
    Elder Member BrotherUnitNo_4's Avatar
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    I always find myself asking what it is that's preventing writers of color getting proper recognition by the Big Two.
    Currently reading She-Hulk, Deadpool, Swamp Thing, Ms. Marvel

    Probation: Ghost Rider, Loki: LoA, Secret Avengers

    Looking forward to All-New Ultimates, Flash Gordon and Doctor Mirage.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon M Easton View Post
    If you're interested in what a lot of the folks on the indie side are up to, we made a (constantly) growing list of Black-produced indie graphic novels and series. Check it out whenever you get the chance:

    http://foolscrusade.blogspot.com/201...ced-indie.html

    Otherwise, we're out here and we're making stuff. Things will change in time. We just have to move one step at a time.

    :)

    BME
    Thanks for the link. bookmarked.
    My webcomic Updated weekly
    My BlogSTORM/Black Panther Sabotage
    BEBOP--"Roland = pinnacle of objectivity"

  7. #7

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    Always love to read anything Joe has to say. So let me ask a blunt question. Are writers of color being specifically excluded from writing for the big two because they are minorities? Or is it because of the specific subject matter they wish to see published? Is it a combination? Milestone was such a breath of fresh air because of the sheer diversity of characters and subject matter. And because Milestone employed a rainbow of talent, (which included white talent as well), one could say that it proved that you could produce exceptional material, that people will buy, that utilized truly diverse talent and characters. Which naively leads me to think that creators would be judged solely on the merits of their actual work. I'm guessing that is not the case...

  8. #8
    Elder Member Charles RB's Avatar
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    There are less writers of color in the combined creative pool of the top two publishers of comic books then there were at Milestone in 1993.
    Really? Bloody hell. A number of those creators will be working for companies that aren't Marvel and DC or publishing themselves - there's a lot more options - but Marvel and DC are still big employees and something creators want to work for (because Spider-Man and s). I'd expect numbers to be static or not increased much, but not to have shrunk.
    "We must fight on!"
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gregory Wright View Post
    Always love to read anything Joe has to say. So let me ask a blunt question. Are writers of color being specifically excluded from writing for the big two because they are minorities? Or is it because of the specific subject matter they wish to see published? Is it a combination? Milestone was such a breath of fresh air because of the sheer diversity of characters and subject matter. And because Milestone employed a rainbow of talent, (which included white talent as well), one could say that it proved that you could produce exceptional material, that people will buy, that utilized truly diverse talent and characters. Which naively leads me to think that creators would be judged solely on the merits of their actual work. I'm guessing that is not the case...
    Friends hire friends.

    If a White guy is an editor or talent scout or publisher and 99% of his circle of contacts and friends are mainly White males, guess who gets invited to pitch or hired on the spot?

    The thing is that the circle of friends is tight and next to impossible to crack if you're a writer. For artists, it tends to be a bit more egalitarian, which is why a lot of artists don't understand the complaints from Black writers. For them, it is much easier to get through the circle, but what has to happen is a Black indie creator have large scale sales and critical acclaim and you MIGHT see this change.

    BME
    WRITING FOR ROOKIES - One of the few, if not only, podcasts dedicated to the aspiring sci-fi and comic book writer.
    http://writingforrookies.podcastpeople.com/

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gregory Wright View Post
    Always love to read anything Joe has to say. So let me ask a blunt question. Are writers of color being specifically excluded from writing for the big two because they are minorities? Or is it because of the specific subject matter they wish to see published? Is it a combination? Milestone was such a breath of fresh air because of the sheer diversity of characters and subject matter. And because Milestone employed a rainbow of talent, (which included white talent as well), one could say that it proved that you could produce exceptional material, that people will buy, that utilized truly diverse talent and characters. Which naively leads me to think that creators would be judged solely on the merits of their actual work. I'm guessing that is not the case...
    That is a good question. because that was a whole stable of talent...except for Chris Cross. McDuffie. JH Williams, and a few others..it wasnt like those published creators got any offers?

    What happened to Robert Washington III--John Rozum (editorially) still haunts me.
    My webcomic Updated weekly
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  11. #11

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    Should be a good piece. Especially excited about this line: "The discussion of diversity will encompass other groups in addition to Black creators." Also, just as important as discussing different groups, is discussing the diversity within these groups. Some folks seem to think that once you've herded people into a "defining" characteristic, you'll know what it is they bring to the table; that all black writers (or women writers, or gay writers, or any other group you can think of) would all write similar things.

    Obviously, there's a huge amount of ways we can categorize people, and a lot of folks identify with the cultures of the groups they fall into, but we can't lose sight of that fact that we're all individual points of views that can bring such a huge array of perspectives to tell stories from. You find me two lesbian Brazilian women in the same age range who have both been blind since birth, and I'll show you two women who agree and disagree about a billion things. I bet one might identify as more as a lesbian than a blind person, or some other combination. And they could both take their unique life experiences and form completely different opinions about a litany of things, among them could be Batman. Maybe I'm just rambling at this point, but I feel like people hear "diversity" and just think of the groups of people, instead of what ideas they could have since they've led such different lives.

  12. #12

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    Robert Washington III passed away in 2012 I am sorry to say.

  13. #13

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    Sue DeConnick writes Captain Marvel and I am enjoying it. But i hear criticisms that she focuses too much on her piloting and aviation career. I do not know if its legit or just fans wanting to see her with long blond hair and thigh high boots most of the time.
    My webcomic Updated weekly
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  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gregory Wright View Post
    Robert Washington III passed away in 2012 I am sorry to say.
    I realized that after I hit reply. Major bummer.
    My webcomic Updated weekly
    My BlogSTORM/Black Panther Sabotage
    BEBOP--"Roland = pinnacle of objectivity"

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon M Easton View Post
    Friends hire friends.

    If a White guy is an editor or talent scout or publisher and 99% of his circle of contacts and friends are mainly White males, guess who gets invited to pitch or hired on the spot?

    The thing is that the circle of friends is tight and next to impossible to crack if you're a writer. For artists, it tends to be a bit more egalitarian, which is why a lot of artists don't understand the complaints from Black writers. For them, it is much easier to get through the circle, but what has to happen is a Black indie creator have large scale sales and critical acclaim and you MIGHT see this change.

    BME
    I was a Marvel editor in the late 80's and have been freelancing since I left staff, so I'm pretty familiar with the various forms of nepotism that run rampant through the industry. Dwayne McDuffie was a very good friend and collaborator. I even opened the door at Marvel a bit so he could get himself on staff. I can say that there really weren't many Black writers who tried to get work at that time, other than Dwayne and Jim Owsley. And some of us were actively looking outside of the comfort zone of familiar writers. What I am wondering, is what is happening today when a Black writer approaches the big two? Is said writer treated as ANY writer, or differently because they are black?

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