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  1. #91
    Junior Member Duke Togo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sundowhn View Post
    , with adjectiveless hitting lowest for the moment probably due to roster/artistic change combined with scandal.




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    I'm out of the loop. What scandal?

  2. #92

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jackraow21 View Post
    I like Bendis fine so I wasn't implying that. Just saying that these numbers probably look a lot different with the digital sales factored in. How different and what exactly they look like? No freaking clue.
    There's an interview I read somewhere (maybe Newsarama?) with someone that said digital sales tend to be around 15% of print sales each month. Which does make all these numbers look a bit better. 15% is a nice chunk, but not unbelievable. May have gone up since that interview since digital is becoming more and more of a thing. In fact, it might have not so much gone up as taken a larger chunk out of print sales. I know I get all my comics digitally now, though I live abroad so I'm an outlier.
    Pull List: Uncanny X-men, All-New X-men, X-force, Guardians of the Galaxy, Iron Man, X-men, Superior Spider-man, Amazing X-men, All-New X-factor (updated ahead)

  3. #93
    BAMF Brigade Sundowhn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duke Togo View Post
    I'm out of the loop. What scandal?
    Personal scandal for Wood. There's a lengthy thread about it.

  4. #94
    salt in my porridge jarrod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jollygoldfish View Post
    You can decide for yourself if the math is nonsensical or not. The numbers come out to an average of $267k per issue for Morrison which translates to around $350k per issue in 2013 dollars and $323k per issue for Bendis. X-men comics have gotten more expensive relative to other goods and relative to other comics. I think it's fair to look at the revenue numbers unless you believe price has no impact on demand. And if you want to look at just order numbers, you need to go back to 2008 to find a year where an X-title sold as well as ANXM.

    Bendis isn't my favorite writer but I did this as an exercise to see how well the X-franchise was doing and this is what the numbers are telling me.

    I'll keep this short but you're misusing inflation rates, which people often do. Inflation in economics simply means buying power in laymans terms and is used for the value of currency. Applying it to the value of goods is a common mistake, what you should be using is relative pricing and that's doesn't necessairly correlate to inflation for a variety of reasons.

    To use your math and apply it to the industry at large, retail comics sales would be healthier today than in 2001. That's something I doubt you'd find many within the industry agreeing with.
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  5. #95

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    Didn't see the above table before, but it makes me curious about something. I'd like to see the percentage that digital sales make up for a number 1 versus other issues in a series. Because it doesn't make a ton of sense that books drop at such a freakishly huge rate. I mean drops are fine, but it's very odd to think that there are people that go in, but the 1st issue of everything, and then just drop it immediately after that.

    It seems more likely to me that digital sales account for a smaller proportion of issue 1 sales since a lot of people like to have 'special' issues like number 1s, and anniversaries, and then perhaps start buying the rest of the series digitally. I know a couple of people that do this, and I'm curious if it's a trend.
    Pull List: Uncanny X-men, All-New X-men, X-force, Guardians of the Galaxy, Iron Man, X-men, Superior Spider-man, Amazing X-men, All-New X-factor (updated ahead)

  6. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by jarrod View Post
    To use your math and apply it to the industry at large, retail comics sales would be healthier today than in 2001. That's something I doubt you'd find many within the industry agreeing with.
    I don't know about that, comics weren't exactly doing well in 2001, the superhero movie wave hadn't really picked up much momentum and the whole nostalgic impulse of that decade had yet to really take off either. Most people were just content to ignore the existence of superheroes altogether and find better things to do with their lives than reading comics. Both Morrison's run and the X-Men films were obsessed with appearing slick and modern, the X-Men brand was almost like a mark of shame to them. Say what you want about the quality of the product these days, but the traditional superhero certainly has a lot more cachet with the general public than it did 13 years ago.

  7. #97

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    People are also forgetting in comparing numbers you need to look at the market as a whole. That means you have to find the average and then compare the percentile ranks of said comics.
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  8. #98

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    Quote Originally Posted by jarrod View Post
    I'll keep this short but you're misusing inflation rates, which people often do. Inflation in economics simply means buying power in laymans terms and is used for the value of currency. Applying it to the value of goods is a common mistake, what you should be using is relative pricing and that's doesn't necessairly correlate to inflation for a variety of reasons.
    Please be as verbose as you need to be. This interests me. I majored in Economics but I work in private wealth management. I'm a finance geek not a micro geek.

    I don't see how I'm misusing inflation rates. I'm evaluating the revenue, generated from Morrison vs. Bendis which is measured in currency. Hence, inflation adjustment using the CPI is appropriate as it is a time series measured in USD. In fact, the inflation adjustment illustrates the relative price changes from Morrison to Bendis. Each ANXM comic is $3.99 which is higher than the inflation adjusted price of a NXM comic of $2.97, i.e. the prices of X-Men comics have risen faster than the prices of other goods and services. A Bendis comic today is 33% more expensive than a Morrison comic in 2001 which is why though demand for Bendis is less, he still sells enough to make almost as much money in physical sales as Morrison.

    Quote Originally Posted by jarrod View Post
    To use your math and apply it to the industry at large, retail comics sales would be healthier today than in 2001. That's something I doubt you'd find many within the industry agreeing with.
    Retail comics sales ARE healthier today than in 2001. In 2001, the top 300 comics from each month sold 67 mio copies. In 2013, the top 300 comics from each month sold 85 mio copies.

    EDIT: That's a 27% increase in sales while the weighted average price of a comic book has increased in line with inflation so the sales increase is due to a real increase in demand not from a relative price decrease.
    Last edited by jollygoldfish; 01-15-2014 at 01:59 PM.

  9. #99
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    TPB's are more popular now than they were in 2001 too. + add in digital sales and you could prob put the increase at 35% plus.

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