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  1. #16
    Hardcover addict dupont2005's Avatar
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    Groo, Elfquest, Epic Illustrated
    The Copper Age is my Golden Age
    My 2014 1000 comic progress

  2. #17
    Mark Brodersen hondobrode's Avatar
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    It's never been finished. I'd still buy it, but of course it'll never happen.

    Byrne did tell how he would have wrapped it up on his web site.

    Yes, ed2962, Marvel did create the imprint in direct response to the indies of the day : Pacific, Eclipse, First, Comico...

    I loved Epic.

    Some great stuff besides what you guys have mentioned so far I remember...






    I am what I am and that's all what I am

  3. #18
    Mark Brodersen hondobrode's Avatar
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    was the personification of



    and that's when Marvel was truly great
    I am what I am and that's all what I am

  4. #19
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    For me, Dreadstar was always my favorite of the Epic line of comics. I loved Starlin's work at Marvel in the 1970s and his Dreadstar was such a great cosmic saga. My biggest problem was the gaps I had to deal with because I lived more than 100 miles away from the nearest comic shop and major chain book store, so I only got an issue here and an issue there and it wasn't until at least a decade after it went to First Comics that I was able to read the entire MarvelEpic Dreadstar run.
    BUT, Groo the Wanderer was always the one series I loved to pick up and read each and every month, and, for some odd reason, it was available on the newsstand, which allowed me to read it every month. I got more enjoyment out of this series than just about any comic series I ever read. Month in and month out, Sergio Aragones and Mark Evanier created some of the most fun tales ever published and I can go back and reread those stories and still laugh out loud.

  5. #20
    Elder Member thwhtGuardian's Avatar
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    Although later reprinted by DC I loved the chapter of Tor that Joe Kubert published on the Epic Line and Time Spirits is to this day one of my favorite comic books ever published.

  6. #21
    Mark Brodersen hondobrode's Avatar
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    Yes, those were both good.

    I've got the entire run of Time Spirits but have not read it all the way through.

    Kubert's Tor is so cool.

    Oddly enough, I'm wondering if Kubert owned the rights to Tor. I think he did. He published himself in the 50's under 3-D Comics, DC later published, and then Epic.
    I am what I am and that's all what I am

  7. #22
    FF purist-snob
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    Coyote
    Elektra:Assassin
    Marshall Law
    Starstruck
    "Cant say it better than CaptCleghorn." - RolandJP

  8. #23
    Say WHAT?!?!?!? FanboyStranger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hondobrode View Post
    Kubert's Tor is so cool.

    Oddly enough, I'm wondering if Kubert owned the rights to Tor. I think he did. He published himself in the 50's under 3-D Comics, DC later published, and then Epic.
    Yeah, he did. The copyright for the last mini is listed to the company Kubert created to hold his copyrights, which is in the names of his children. A few years before his death, Joe struck a deal with DC that DC would provide a 'Kubert Library' for his creator-owned works, which is why we got Yossel, Jew Gangster, etc. It was sort of an emeritus deal for Joe's service to the company. I have wondered about the status of Fax from Sarajevo, though, as that may be his most significant creator-owned work.

  9. #24
    Mark Brodersen hondobrode's Avatar
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    I first saw Tor at DC and later found out he had created and published it in the 50's. Later, we see it at Epic.

    It wasn't until I thought about the fact that it had 3 different homes that Kubert probably owned it, and then realized I'd never seen Tor in any other DC's. Anthro yes, but not Tor.

    Still haven't read Fax but def will someday. Just picked up a Kubert horror volume from Fantagraphics on Comixology that was on sale.
    I am what I am and that's all what I am

  10. #25
    CotM Member Rob Allen's Avatar
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    Kubert created Tor in the 50s, but he wasn't a publisher back then, or ever. Tor was originally published by St. John, an innovative little company where Joe worked for several years. The company moved away from comics and into other kinds of magazines in the late 50s, and then its president, Archer St. John, died suddenly. His son Michael took over the company, and here I'll let historian Ken Quattro tell you what happened:

    One uniquely progressive move Michael made (perhaps in respect to his late father’s wishes?) was relinquishing all rights to the caveman, Tor, to his creator, Joe Kubert. This rare bit of generosity in a time long before creator’s rights were acknowledged, allowed Kubert to walk away from the company with his signature character; one that he has revived several times, including as an unsold 1959 comic strip collaboration with Carmine Infantino.
    The quote is from http://www.comicartville.com/archerstjohnpg3.htm. Start at http://www.comicartville.com/archerstjohn.htm for the whole story of St. John comics.
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    Rob Allen

  11. #26
    Say WHAT?!?!?!? FanboyStranger's Avatar
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    I just got home, and I was curious so I checked out the indencia for that last Tor mini. The copyright for Tor is listed for Tell-a-Graphics, Inc, Adam Kubert, Andrew Kubert, Daniel Kubert, David Kubert, and Lisa Zangara. Tell-a-Graphics, Inc was an artist's agency that Joe had founded, and he had served as its President until his death. It's affliated with the Kubert School. So, Joe pretty much ceded the rights to his children.

  12. #27
    Elder Member thwhtGuardian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Allen View Post
    Kubert created Tor in the 50s, but he wasn't a publisher back then, or ever. Tor was originally published by St. John, an innovative little company where Joe worked for several years. The company moved away from comics and into other kinds of magazines in the late 50s, and then its president, Archer St. John, died suddenly. His son Michael took over the company, and here I'll let historian Ken Quattro tell you what happened:



    The quote is from http://www.comicartville.com/archerstjohnpg3.htm. Start at http://www.comicartville.com/archerstjohn.htm for the whole story of St. John comics.
    Quote Originally Posted by FanboyStranger View Post
    I just got home, and I was curious so I checked out the indencia for that last Tor mini. The copyright for Tor is listed for Tell-a-Graphics, Inc, Adam Kubert, Andrew Kubert, Daniel Kubert, David Kubert, and Lisa Zangara. Tell-a-Graphics, Inc was an artist's agency that Joe had founded, and he had served as its President until his death. It's affliated with the Kubert School. So, Joe pretty much ceded the rights to his children.
    I'm a life long Kubert fan and I never knew either of these things. I always assumed he owned Tor as he's published it just about everywhere but know that those rights were granted to him after the fact is really great.

    And Hondo, you should totally check out Fax from Sarajevo. I only recently read it this past summer and it blew me away. It's possibly one of the greatest comics ever done, it really blew me away.

  13. #28
    Welcome to Bleeker Street MRP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thwhtGuardian View Post
    I'm a life long Kubert fan and I never knew either of these things. I always assumed he owned Tor as he's published it just about everywhere but know that those rights were granted to him after the fact is really great.

    And Hondo, you should totally check out Fax from Sarajevo. I only recently read it this past summer and it blew me away. It's possibly one of the greatest comics ever done, it really blew me away.
    Fax from Sarajevo is the book that made me a Kubert junkie. I had always been familiar with his work, and the JK school, but reading that blew me away and made me start seeking out his work to add to me collection. Prior to that, the only thing of his that was really on my radar was his Hawkman work, as I essentially ignored war comics and the like. I read Fax about 10-15 years ago now, and it made me take another look at Kubert's stuff as a whole.
    -M
    A lunatic is easily recognized...You can tell him by the liberties he takes with common sense...and by the fact that sooner or later he brings up the Templars.
    -Umberto Eco

  14. #29
    Elder Member thwhtGuardian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MRP View Post
    Fax from Sarajevo is the book that made me a Kubert junkie. I had always been familiar with his work, and the JK school, but reading that blew me away and made me start seeking out his work to add to me collection. Prior to that, the only thing of his that was really on my radar was his Hawkman work, as I essentially ignored war comics and the like. I read Fax about 10-15 years ago now, and it made me take another look at Kubert's stuff as a whole.
    -M
    He's definitely one of the greatest creators to ever live, and Fax has to be the pinnacle of his work. I just struck me hard, it's so raw and real and unlike any other comic I've ever experienced.

    If you're a fan of horror comics you should really check out the fantagraphics Kubert collection it has a ton of his work from the 40's and 50's and it's awesome to see just how great his craft was even that early in his career.

  15. #30
    world of yesterday benday-dot's Avatar
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    Fans of Kubert's Tor mini under the Epic mark should check out the just released Artist's Edition from IDW, which reprints the story. It's breathtakingly gorgeous stuff, as are all Artists Editions. Some of the comic strip effort Rob mentions above is also included in the volume.

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