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  1. #16
    Senior Member Ish Kabbible's Avatar
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    So basically,within the last 10 years-nothing except Kick Ass
    What a revolting developement

  2. #17
    Senior Member Dizzy D's Avatar
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    Depending on how that upcoming TV-series will work out, Jessica Jones.

  3. #18
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pil View Post
    Deadpool
    Yes, the character appears to have taken on a whole new life that I'm completely in the dark about. I only knew him as a lame Liefield villain who looked visually lifted from Spiderman.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ish Kabbible View Post
    So basically,within the last 10 years-nothing except Kick Ass
    What a revolting developement
    Isn't that the way, though? Anything that's "hot" right away is seen as little more than a fan-boy fad at first, not to be valid or taken seriously. But, after ten years, if the praise survives, older fans begin to take notice. I suspect older fans felt this way when the Marvel Silver Age rolled around.

    But, in a larger sense (and I've argued this before), the superhero genre is a severely outdated one. It made sense in an age in which street level crime was an everyday concern for most and corruption was transparent and visible on your street corner. If you ask any random person their top ten worries and/or the top ten evils they see in the world today, precious few of those can be solved with a super-powered punch. The world doesn't need Batman, Superman, or Spiderman all that much anymore. It's a fun empowerment fantasy, but I think it's the costumes, powers, and cultural mythology that keep us reading -- not the genre premise. And there are only so many costume and power combos out there; it's hard to create something innovative enough these days that it can compete for attention with a well established cultural icon character.
    Last edited by shaxper; 11-10-2013 at 02:33 PM.

  4. #19
    Senior Member Shawn Hopkins's Avatar
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    The Runaways are probably the most recent non-legacy success from Marvel. That was, geez, 10 years ago? Wow.

    There are a lot of cool recent Marvel creations appearing now in Avengers Arena. But since the point of that book is to kill them off Hunger Games Style, I guess that gives you an idea of how successful Marvel considers them. Even a couple of the Runaways are in there.

    With D.C., maybe Damian counts? But he's just another Robin, really. And Batwoman is a Batman spinoff.
    Last edited by Shawn Hopkins; 11-10-2013 at 03:22 PM.

  5. #20
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn Hopkins View Post
    With D.C., maybe Damian counts? But he's just another Robin, really. And Batwoman is a Batman spinoff.
    Damian feels much like Jason Todd if he'd been younger and hadn't been killed (oh wait...).

    But Kate Kane Batwoman, she's most certainly her own original character, and while being a "Bat" character certainly got her in the door to begin with, it was more JH Williams' art that kept her going and growing in popularity. But does the character have an innate ability to thrive without his art? I'm really not sure. Plenty of solo Bat titles starring characters more closely tied to the main property have been cancelled over the years. Kane really has almost no connection to Batman other than the name and costume.

  6. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by shaxper View Post
    "But, in a larger sense (and I've argued this before), the superhero genre is a severely outdated one. It made sense in an age in which street level crime was an everyday concern for most and corruption was transparent and visible on your street corner. If you ask any random person their top ten worries and/or the top ten evils they see in the world today, precious few of those can be solved with a super-powered punch. The world doesn't need Batman, Superman, or Spiderman all that much anymore.
    ""Everybody loves a hero. People line up for them, cheer them on, scream their names. And years later, they'll tell how they stood in the rain for hours just to get a glimpse of the one who taught them how to hold on a second longer. I believe there's a hero in all of us, that keeps us honest, gives us strength, makes us noble, and finally allows us to die with pride, even though sometimes we have to be steady, and give up the thing we want the most. Even our dreams."
    --AUNT MAY PARKER

  7. #22
    Say WHAT?!?!?!? FanboyStranger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adam_warlock_2099 View Post
    I don't know how successful it's numbers are but Matt Wagners Mage comes to mind as a success at least in my opinion in reading both series. And his character and story is unique. I'm sure there's somethings that could be sited as influences but not major carbon copied traits or characteristics.
    The thing is that Mage is thirty years old, and as great as it is, I don't think it has much recognition outside of the comics cognisanti. I'd also argue that Grendel is far more recognizable, and even that is merely a cult curiousity outside of fandom. (Perhaps even within it these days. I think Wagner's work has gotten to the point where it's far more appreciated by professionals than fans. That happens, though. See: Chaykin, Howard, for example.)

  8. #23
    Say WHAT?!?!?!? FanboyStranger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by foxley View Post
    Critter is great fun to read: an old-fashioned superhero romp, without the unnecessary darkness and grittiness. I don't know if if you'd count it as a 'success', but it seems to be doing pretty god for an indy superhero book.
    I consider myself widely read on all levels of contemporary comics, but I have to confess that I have no idea what Critter is. My curiosity is piqued, though.

  9. #24
    Pensive Bergman's Avatar
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    Invincible

  10. #25
    Senior Member Angilas-Man's Avatar
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    Atomic Robo!

  11. #26
    Ex-Cheeks Reptisaurus!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FanboyStranger View Post
    I've always felt that Hellboy fits quite squarely into the superhero genre. There's a lot more superhero in his dna than horror, in my opinion, and while I could see the argument that it's a horror book, it's still mostly 'guy with superpowers fights villains.' (I find that to be the case with a lot of the '70s 'monster' books that had an influence on Hellboy.) Like a lot of superhero books over the past 30 years, Hellboy and BPRD take elements from all sorts of genres and blend them together quite well. In a way, it's like Mignola decided to take the old Strange Tales features of Dr. Strange and Nick Fury, add The Hulk, and combine them into one character. Since all of those characters would be considered superheroes-- Fury is probably borderline, but he does battle evil with superheroes, so he's at least part of the club-- I don't see why Hellboy wouldn't be.
    I basically consider Hellboy an archetype that pre-dates superheroes - He's a monster hunter, part Beowulf and part Van Helsing. If Superman and his derivatives never happened, Hellboy could exist just fine.

    Although there's no way in hell I'd consider the Hulk a superhero, either.
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  12. #27
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    But who has the same success like Superman, Batman, X-Men or Spider-Man? I mean Deadpool? No, he has got no movie, yet. Maybe later, his game arrived already. INvincible? Nope. Hellboy, maybe the most known of them all, due to his two movies. Runaways...pfft.

  13. #28
    Senior Member edhopper's Avatar
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    Forever Carlyle from Lazarus. Okay I'm sorta kidding. But I think the movement of big name writers like Brubaker, Casey, Rucka, JMS, etc... to creator owned might give us a new iconic character. Time will tell.

  14. #29
    Senior Member Angilas-Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reptisaurus! View Post
    I basically consider Hellboy an archetype that pre-dates superheroes - He's a monster hunter, part Beowulf and part Van Helsing. If Superman and his derivatives never happened, Hellboy could exist just fine.

    Although there's no way in hell I'd consider the Hulk a superhero, either.
    'Superhero' is equated with 'costume hero' so everything seems kinda off when we think about descriptions. I mean, if all you need are powers and fighting bad guys then you've got a great deal of characters from myth, fiction, and comics - way before Superman's time: Hercules, Sun Wukong, Popeye the Sailor...

  15. #30
    Soul Gem Resident adam_warlock_2099's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FanboyStranger View Post
    The thing is that Mage is thirty years old, and as great as it is, I don't think it has much recognition outside of the comics cognisanti. I'd also argue that Grendel is far more recognizable, and even that is merely a cult curiousity outside of fandom. (Perhaps even within it these days. I think Wagner's work has gotten to the point where it's far more appreciated by professionals than fans. That happens, though. See: Chaykin, Howard, for example.)
    Now that you mention it I hadn't realized the first series was that old. I was thinking they were both published in the late 90s. I was Ted to mention Grendel as I really liked Hunnter Rose but figured that was outside of the typical hero mold. It's a shame more people don't appreciate his work. It's good stuff. The Batman/Grendel crossover is one of my favorite Batmanstories. Wagners Batman is visually awesome.
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