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  1. #241

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    Quote Originally Posted by inferno View Post
    Did everyone see The Simpsons' take on Freaks Sunday?
    Yeah that was a pretty good Treehouse of Horrors.
    "It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison

  2. #242

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    Quote Originally Posted by shaxper View Post
    #22: Isle of the Dead (1945/USA)
    Karloff is good in this. The mood is very creepy and I think it's pretty cool that it was inspired by a Bocklin painting. TCM is showing the film Friday night for those interested.
    "It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison

  3. #243
    Senior Member MDG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ood Omega View Post
    Yeah that was a pretty good Treehouse of Horrors.
    Did they do this years' already? It seems like they had been appearing after Halloween.
    "It's just lines on paper, folks!"

  4. #244
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ood Omega View Post
    Karloff is good in this. The mood is very creepy and I think it's pretty cool that it was inspired by a Bocklin painting. TCM is showing the film Friday night for those interested.
    It's funny, but this is probably the only Karloff film I've ever seen where his involvement wasn't all that important to me. He did a fine job, but his character was less dynamic than usual, and it really ended up being more of an ensemble film as well.

  5. #245
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
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    #21: The Bat (1926/USA)

    Though often eclipsed by its two more famous remakes (one because Vincent Price took the lead role, and one for its more immediate influence in the creation of Batman), this was the first and arguably strongest of the films, all starring a terrifying master thief known as "The Bat."

    Originally performed as a play, the film relies more upon drama than special effects to shock us. We're offered a compelling mystery that continues to expand in complexity until the close, dramatic tension among incredibly well acted characters, some truly fun comic relief, and an overwhelming tone of spookiness, mystery, and dread.

    Though the 1930 remake was the film that directly influenced the creation of Batman, the character's prototypical presence is just as equally felt here in terms of the villain's costume, wall scaling abilities, and even the bat signal he flashes to announce his presence. Though this is not a primary selling point for the film, it's fascinating to watch, nonetheless.

    Unlike other popular Old Dark House type horror films that depend upon confusion and subterfuge to advance the plot, The Bat adds to this a compelling, terrifying, and anonymous flamboyant villain at the center of it all, as well as incredibly strong directing, acting, and plotting, all to serve up an incredibly captivating mystery horror film.

    Watch it tonight on Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zh9Q_dl380Q

  6. #246
    Elder Member thwhtGuardian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaxper View Post
    She's such an under-appreciated dimension of the film. Her character and lines are severely lacking, but she brings brilliant energy to the role. She often seems to outclass everyone around her, especially in her love scene with Bruce Cabot.



    True, and yet it holds back on making any kind of final commentary in the end, instead resorting to the "Beauty killed the Beast' epitaph that doesn't really fit. No, the producer owes New York some big explanations and apologies for trying to bottle and sell something he had no business messing with, but no one says a thing to him.



    LOVE that you diplomatically omitted the Peter Jackson version from this list.
    In Son of Kong they mention litigation but it's a there and gone reference.

    I feel like I'm one of the few who actually like Peter Jackson's version. It could do with some editing but I loved the effects and thought the love story with Kong was really well done.

  7. #247

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    Quote Originally Posted by MDG View Post
    Did they do this years' already? It seems like they had been appearing after Halloween.
    For nearly a decade they aired Treehouse the first Sunday after Halloween. But for the last three years they have been airing them in October again like they did way back in the 90s.
    "It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison

  8. #248
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
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    For what it's worth (admittedly, I've made a few minor changes to the list since the countdown began...):


    Films appearing in the Top 50 by year:


    1896: 1
    1897:
    1898:
    1899:

    1890s total: 1

    1900:
    1901:
    1902:
    1903: 1
    1904:
    1905:
    1906: 1
    1907:
    1908:
    1909:

    1900s total: 2

    1910:
    1911:
    1912:
    1913:
    1914: 1
    1915:
    1916:
    1917:
    1918:
    1919:

    1910s total: 1

    1920: 3
    1921: 1
    1922: 2
    1923: 1
    1924:
    1925: 1
    1926: 2
    1927:
    1928:
    1929:

    1920s total: 10

    1930:
    1931: 3
    1932: 7
    1933: 3
    1934: 1
    1935: 4
    1936:
    1937:
    1938:
    1939:

    1930s total: 18

    1940: 1
    1941: 2
    1942: 1
    1943: 3
    1944: 5
    1945: 4
    1946: 1

    1940s total: 17


    I can explain the drop at the end of the 1920s (fall of the Weimer Republic in Germany), but what's up with the end of the 1930s? The Depression taking its toll? Anxiety about war in Europe turning people away from horror?? People deciding the monster films of the early '30s were just a fad??? Or maybe there are a ton of quality horror films out there from this era that I just don't know about somehow????
    Last edited by shaxper; 10-12-2013 at 09:06 PM.

  9. #249

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    Already on the top 20. We're getting close!

    Quote Originally Posted by shaxper View Post
    33: Dead of Night (1945/United Kingdom)
    This film will be on TCM Friday night airing right after Isle of the Dead for those interested.
    I've already set my reminder timer!
    "It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison

  10. #250
    Senior Member glue's Avatar
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    Thanks! Just set mine to record (also recording Isle of the Dead).

  11. #251
    Senior Member MDG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaxper View Post

    I can explain the drop at the end of the 1920s (fall of the Weimer Republic in Germany), but what's up with the end of the 1930s? The Depression taking its toll? Anxiety about war in Europe turning people away from horror?? People deciding the monster films of the early '30s were just a fad??? Or maybe there are a ton of quality horror films out there from this era that I just don't know about somehow????
    I think it was that by the mid-30s it seemed horror had run its course for a while. I believe it was when the re-release double-bill of Frankenstein and Dracula started doing boffo B.O. that the next wave ('39 into the 40s) started, but usually as B-pictures.
    "It's just lines on paper, folks!"

  12. #252
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    #20: I Walked with a Zombie (1943/USA)

    Alfred Hitchcock's "Rebecca," meets Jane Eyre, meets a zombie-worshipping voodoo cult. Surprisingly, the marriage really clicks. Add to that some strong acting and writing, plus some masterful scenic direction and signature Val Lewton use of shadows, plus one of the most moving and bittersweet endings in all of horrordom (my second favorite of all time, in fact, after #2 on this list...), and you're in for an unforgettable and thoroughly moving experience.

    There are currently no free streaming sources for this film, but you can rent it and watch it online tonight via Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/I-Walked-with-...+with+a+zombie

  13. #253
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ood Omega View Post
    This film will be on TCM Friday night airing right after Isle of the Dead for those interested.
    I've already set my reminder timer!
    What an awesome double-billing. This is one of those rare days when I wish I had cable.

  14. #254

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    Quote Originally Posted by shaxper View Post
    #33: Dead of Night (1945/United Kingdom)
    Just caught this on TCM for the first time and enjoyed it. Which of the stories was written by H.G. Wells? The golf story is probably my least favorite of the segments. The premise of "we'll play golf for this women's affection" seems ridiculously dated. At first the humor feels like it interrupts the mood of the film but the next story starts with similar humor and is the darkest story in the film. If they make a live action Batman with the Ventriloquist as the villain that's exactly how it should be done. Frederick Valk is quite good as the doctor as is Anthony Baird as the man who dreamed them all meeting. Michael Redgrave really steals the show though. His performance as the ventriloquist is one of the craziest things I've seen in any horror film. Right up there with Jack Nicholson in The Shining. That scene in the jail cell when the dummy stands up just wow! Very satisfying ending.
    "It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison

  15. #255
    *choke* Dan B. in the Underworld's Avatar
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    It's no Seventh Victim (you philistine, you!), but I Walked with a Zombie is really quite something, isn't it? I didn't see this until mid-2004, shortly after I resolved, having been inspired by 28 Days Later the previous year & particularly the new Dawn of the Dead that spring, to watch every zombie movie I could ever get my hands on. I'd had the Lewton film on VHS for years, having taped it off TCM or the like back in probably the late '80s, but that was the impetus I needed to finally sit down & watch it. (This was true as well around the same time with my old home-taped copy of Hammer's Plague of the Zombies.)

    At the time, it was probably about the 30th zombie flick I'd ever seen (I'd seen 19 in my life, I believe, by the end of 2003, then watched 50 or maybe 52 in '04, not counting a re-viewing of the original Dawn, which I'd seen in the theatre in late '78); I've watched somewhere around 250 since ... may god have mercy on my soul.
    Last edited by Dan B. in the Underworld; 10-11-2013 at 10:01 PM.
    I tend to split superhero comics fans into "People who like Krypto" and "People who don't like Krypto."
    Basically, if you miss the wonder of a dog flying around in a little Superman cape, you're in the wrong hobby.

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