Page 7 of 41 FirstFirst ... 3456789101117 ... LastLast
Results 91 to 105 of 615
  1. #91
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Lakewood, OH
    Posts
    6,797

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thwhtGuardian View Post
    And Shax, that line about a Thousand and One Nights? What an awesome phrase.
    You just made my week, my friend. Thanks much

  2. #92
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Lakewood, OH
    Posts
    6,797

    Default

    #41: The Invisible Man (1933/USA)

    Certainly the most unusual of the Universal Horror classics, The Invisible Man foregoes the usual moody atmosphere and score in favor of something both more lighthearted and dark. The Invisible Man follows the murderous rampage of a scientist who is mad, ruthless, violent, and (above all else) delightfully moody. It's a signature move of director James Whale to leave us with those awkward moments in which we wonder whether we should be laughing or horrified. The Invisible Man is a strange and irreverant dance along the dividing line between the two.

    Add to that Claude Rains' breakthrough performance as our invisible protagonist, as well as some frankly impressive special effects for the time period that are used sparingly so as to build suspense, and you've got a film worth watching, enjoying, feeling disturbed by, and then enjoying all over again once you throw the DVD back in the player for a second run.

    Though there are no free streaming sources for this film available at the time being, it can be found on Netflix: http://movies.netflix.com/WiMovie/Th...?trkid=2361637
    Last edited by shaxper; 09-20-2013 at 01:32 PM.

  3. #93
    *choke* Dan B. in the Underworld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    montgomery al
    Posts
    11,420

    Default

    I've had almost nothing to say during this thread so far simply because it's been so many years -- make that decades -- since I've watched the films in question, if indeed I've seen them at all. This one's yet another example of the former ... & yet unlike other lasting Universal classics, a la the Big 3 (Dracula, Frankenstein, The Wolfman & varous sequels thereof), quite a few scenes from Invisible Man still stick with me to this day. Oddly enough, Claude Rains' matchless voice is a large part of that, I think; 40-some-odd years later, it still echoes in my mind's ...well, not eye, but ear.
    I tend to split superhero comics fans into "People who like Krypto" and "People who don't like Krypto."
    Basically, if you miss the wonder of a dog flying around in a little Superman cape, you're in the wrong hobby.

    -- Reptisaurus!

  4. #94

    Default

    I agree the voice of Claude Rains really stands out and is what makes Griffen such a terrifying character.
    "It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison

  5. #95
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Lakewood, OH
    Posts
    6,797

    Default

    #40: The Infernal Cauldron (1903/France)

    Georges Méliès' early horror films were little more than vehicles for showcasing cutting edge special effects. As a result, while they made for dazzling spectacles, the plot was never anything more than an excuse to get from one effect to the next, usually via a sorcerer or other supernatural force simply showing off for three to ten minutes.

    Infernal Cauldron stands apart from this tradition, though, because the effect it was created to showcase was Méliès' new coloring technique (which, incidentally, was entirely done by hand). Since such an effect calls for no specific events to transpire in the film, Infernal Cauldron is free to actually tell a story for the sake of telling a story. Sure, it recycles some classic Méliès effects with wonderful results, but there's also a simple yet satisfying story at the center, in which a demon in Hell tortures a few innocents and then receives its karmic retribution. It's fun, silly, chock full of dazzling effects, brilliantly highlighted with that supernatural haze only hand-coloring can create,and utterly satisfying by the close. Méliès' films always make me "ooh" with wonder, but Infernal Cauldron is truly the only one that consistently makes me smile as well.

    Watch it tonight on Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BizwQGj1LKc
    Last edited by shaxper; 09-21-2013 at 06:01 PM.

  6. #96
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Lakewood, OH
    Posts
    6,797

    Default

    #39: The Avenging Conscience (1914/USA)

    A story about young forbidden love quickly descends into Edgar Allen Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart," goes out Scarface style, and manages to conclude on a happy twist ending. As one of the earliest feature length horror films, D.W. Griffith's "The Avenging Conscience" manages to defy most of the cliches and arch-types that hadn't even been tried yet, instead delivering something wholly unique and engaging. The directing is strong, the acting outstanding, as an initially grounded film gradually descends into the nightmarish and insane. Meanwhile, Griffith deftly utilizes animals as a recurring symbol in order to create a sense of foreboding and being at odds with nature throughout the descent.

    One word of warning: D.W. Griffith's genius is often eclipsed by his reputation for racism. Most would claim this can entirely be attributed to his 1915 feature length film, Birth of a Nation. However, his depiction of Italians in this film is hardly much better.

    You can watch the film on Youtube tonight, along with an experimental new soundtrack that sounds authentic at first, but then descends into insanity along with the film itself: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5MNWRa3ojE
    Last edited by shaxper; 09-22-2013 at 11:36 AM.

  7. #97

    Default

    I haven't heard of either The Infernal Cauldron or The Avenging Conscience before. They both sound like they are worth checking out. Is the The Infernal Cauldron supposed to be under 2 minutes long or is that just a clip? I'm wondering if that's the same coloring technique they used during the masquerade scene in The Phantom Of The Opera when Lon Chaney comes out dressed as Red Death?
    "It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison

  8. #98
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Lakewood, OH
    Posts
    6,797

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ood Omega View Post
    I haven't heard of either The Infernal Cauldron or The Avenging Conscience before. They both sound like they are worth checking out. Is the The Infernal Cauldron supposed to be under 2 minutes long or is that just a clip? I'm wondering if that's the same coloring technique they used during the masquerade scene in The Phantom Of The Opera when Lon Chaney comes out dressed as Red Death?
    Yes, that's the complete film.

    Probably the same hand coloring technique, yes. So far as I know, non-hand coloring techniques weren't pioneered until the early 1930s. The first I'm aware of is Technicolor Phase 2 in 1931, though, inevitably, there must have been a phase 1.

  9. #99
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Lakewood, OH
    Posts
    6,797

    Default

    #38: Werewolf of London (1935/USA)

    Six years before Universal Studios struck gold with The Wolfman, they made this first attempt at launching a werewolf franchise. It's an incredibly well cast film, full of strong acting and great writing, and (much like its predecessor) utilizes the transformation into werewolf as a powerful symbol -- in this case a synthesis of a repressed/obsessive career man's bottled up fear and rage over losing his fiance to a former lover.

    The film also boasts a strong arch nemesis who advances the plot beautifully, a complex and engaging explanation for the werewolf transformation and the means for stopping it, an insidious plot that doesn't fully reveal itself until the climax, and some powerful directing, scoring, and atmosphere as well.

    The film's one downfall, which proved to be its undoing at the box office, was how closely the werewolf in this film resembled the monster from the 1932 version of Doctor Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (#46 on this list). I happen to think this was the superior of the two films, but the similarities are unmistakable. Fans of the later Wolfman story may be surprised to find a werewolf here that can be subdued and injured just as easily as any normal criminally insane man. However, like any great horror film, the true terror in Werewolf of London comes not from what the monster can do, but rather from what the monster represents.

    Watch Werewolf of London tonight on Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3uaVK...AA82BABFD7644C

  10. #100
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Lakewood, OH
    Posts
    6,797

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shaxper View Post
    Yes, that's the complete film.

    Probably the same hand coloring technique, yes. So far as I know, non-hand coloring techniques weren't pioneered until the early 1930s. The first I'm aware of is Technicolor Phase 2 in 1931, though, inevitably, there must have been a phase 1.
    Double checked myself.

    Looks like Technicolor Phase I was invented in 1916 and was already in popular use in 1922, so it's likely that's what was used for Phantom of the Opera.

  11. #101
    Senior Member Hoosier X's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,720

    Default

    I was doing pretty well with your list as I've seen a lot of pre-1945 horror movies (and I just adore Melies), but this last batch scared up two I haven't seen - The Avenging Conscience and the 1944 version of The Lodger.

    I never knew there was a 1944 version of The Lodger! It sounds great! I'll have to be on the lookout.

    I guess I shouldn't be surprised that there's a few I haven't seen because there are so many horror films! But I've seen so many! Stuff like The Mad Ghoul, The Hands of Orlac (The German one with Conrad Veidt), Captive Wild Woman, The Crime of Dr. Crespi, The Golem, The Old Dark House, The Lady and the Monster (with von Stroheim), etc. And what about all those Poverty Row flicks, like The Bowery After Midnight and The Ape?

    We'll see how the list plays out. I'm looking forward to seeing a few more movies I've never heard of. (But not too many!)

    And - assuming the silent version of The Lodger is a little too obvious) I think I've figured out which Hitchcock movie you've chosen.

  12. #102
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Lakewood, OH
    Posts
    6,797

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hoosier X View Post
    I was doing pretty well with your list as I've seen a lot of pre-1945 horror movies (and I just adore Melies), but this last batch scared up two I haven't seen - The Avenging Conscience and the 1944 version of The Lodger.
    To be fair, I saw a lot of these films for the first time this summer in anticipation of making this list. 13 films on the list were totally new to me, as well as 9 more that didn't make the Top 50.

    I never knew there was a 1944 version of The Lodger! It sounds great! I'll have to be on the lookout.
    Me neither! Very grateful that others here recommended it to me.

    I guess I shouldn't be surprised that there's a few I haven't seen because there are so many horror films! But I've seen so many! Stuff like The Mad Ghoul, The Hands of Orlac (The German one with Conrad Veidt), Captive Wild Woman, The Crime of Dr. Crespi, The Golem, The Old Dark House, The Lady and the Monster (with von Stroheim), etc.
    Two of those will be making the list. One in the Top 10, in fact.

    And what about all those Poverty Row flicks, like The Bowery After Midnight and The Ape?
    Definitions of "Poverty Row" vary, but there's at least one film on the Top 50 produced by a company that was legitimately located in Poverty Row. Several others are low budget, to be sure.


    We'll see how the list plays out. I'm looking forward to seeing a few more movies I've never heard of. (But not too many!)
    Most of the bigger surprises have passed (Avenging Conscience and Infernal Cauldron back to back was surely a stumper), but there are still a few coming. I don't expect many to be familiar with my #1, in fact, but there are a lot of old standards coming too. We've barely scratched the surface of the Universal Horror films, nor the German expressionist works before them.

    And - assuming the silent version of The Lodger is a little too obvious) I think I've figured out which Hitchcock movie you've chosen.
    None of my choices were based on whether or not the selection would be obvious, but I was not overly impressed with Hitchcock's version of "The Lodger." Production values were impressive, and there were some iconic shots, but the film really didn't entertain me, nor did it leave strong enough of an impression based on its artistic merits alone.
    Last edited by shaxper; 09-23-2013 at 07:31 PM.

  13. #103

    Default

    I'm a huge fan of Werewolf of London. I like how minimalist the Jack Pierce werewolf makeup is. (Actually there's probably not a makeup of his I dislike.) One of these days I'm going to get around to drawing a portrait of Henry Hull in his werewolf makeup.

    Quote Originally Posted by shaxper View Post
    I don't expect many to be familiar with my #1
    Now I really can't wait to find out which film that is!
    "It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison

  14. #104
    Senior Member Hoosier X's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,720

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shaxper View Post

    Definitions of "Poverty Row" vary, but there's at least one film on the Top 50 produced by a company that was legitimately located in Poverty Row. Several others are low budget, to be sure.
    I think my favorite Poverty Row production is Bowery at Midnight. Oh, yeah, it's cheap and badly done in all the ways you expect, but it has an extra element that, I think, makes it exceptionally eerie, and I think it's ripe for a remake! I kind of doubt that it's on your list, but I am wondering if you've seen it.

    Quote Originally Posted by shaxper View Post
    None of my choices were based on whether or not the selection would be obvious, but I was not overly impressed with Hitchcock's version of "The Lodger." Production values were impressive, and there were some iconic shots, but the film really didn't entertain me, nor did it leave strong enough of an impression based on its artistic merits alone.
    The wording of my original statement does not convey what I meant to express here about Hitchcock's Lodger. I thought it was obvious from some of your other comments on this thread that Hitchcock's Lodger was not going to be on the list. (I'm not a big fan of it either.)

    Looking forward to the next entry!

  15. #105
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Lakewood, OH
    Posts
    6,797

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hoosier X View Post
    I think my favorite Poverty Row production is Bowery at Midnight. Oh, yeah, it's cheap and badly done in all the ways you expect, but it has an extra element that, I think, makes it exceptionally eerie, and I think it's ripe for a remake! I kind of doubt that it's on your list, but I am wondering if you've seen it.
    There's quite a lot of Lugosi I've yet to see. He's probably my absolute favorite horror actor from this era, but when he's off, he's really off, and so I've trudged through viewing his lesser films with some trepidation. However, I believe Bowery is the only Lugosi Monogram film I've yet to see. The plot seems similar to The Human Monster (which I did not enjoy), but I'll definitely check it out.


    The wording of my original statement does not convey what I meant to express here about Hitchcock's Lodger. I thought it was obvious from some of your other comments on this thread that Hitchcock's Lodger was not going to be on the list. (I'm not a big fan of it either.)
    Gotcha.
    Last edited by shaxper; 09-24-2013 at 01:44 PM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •