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  1. #1

    Default The best Spawn story?

    I am interested in getting into a little bit of Spawn. However I don't want to read 200 issues. What are the best 3 or 4 stories of Spawn for me to sample?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Formerly Dragon VileHater NecroDragon's Avatar
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    That's a tough one, mainly because Spawn's best stuff, imo, was before the whole "write for the trade" mentality dawned on the industry, so the stories I'd recommend don't have a concrete beginning or ending and coming into it at any point would feel incomplete. That being said, and if you don't mind jumping into a superhero story midway through (which is what you used to have to do with the Big Two all the time before this decade), my favorite stories were all drawn by Greg Capullo and rested between the 50s and #100. His battle with Urizen being the pinnacle of those issues. You can find those stories in volumes 3 and 4 of the thick tpbs, with the glossy covers. I believe that particular line was discontinued though, and I don't know what replaced them. The Urizen story, specifically, was around the late 80s early 90s (issues), so whatever trades they're publishing now, you should look for the volume(s) containing those issues.
    Another good time in Spawn was when David Hine took over and the artist was Philip Tan, then Brian Haberlin. It was the best that Spawn had been in a long time, but it still pales in comparison to the stories I already mentioned.
    If you end up reading the Urizen story and the stuff right before it or right after it and really like it, you should just try reading the whole series from the beginning. Spawn started out mediocre, then after about twenty issues or so, got really good, peaked around issue 90-100, then had a steep drop off in quality for a long time until David Hine came on. Unfortunately, it never was able to quite recapture the magic that it once had.
    Dunno how much help all that is, but I hope it answers your question at least a little.
    Gaze into the abyss.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Dark-Flux's Avatar
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    Id say to check out the early stuff, say the first 20ish issues. You can kind of pick and choose randomly from the Capullo era, though its worth reading the arcs in and around 100.
    Then slip to Hines run at 150-184.
    Endgame wasnt great but was important.
    And the current run has been pretty good. Jump in at 201 or 220.

  4. #4

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    So many to choose.
    On top of my head, I'd say:
    -Spawn's second encounter with Redeemer. #31-32
    -Urizen arc #95 +
    -Spawn assaults the throne of hell and Malebolgia with Cog and Angela #100+
    -Great single story, Spawn #30
    Honestly dude just pick up anything before #150 and there's a highly good chance you'll end up with soemthing great.

  5. #5
    Junior Member Amy Racecar's Avatar
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    theres some really good one off issues early on, check out issues 29 & 30

  6. #6

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    The entire Armageddon arc. Simply f'n epic. But it truly epic if you read everything from the beginning. "What you plan on doing is watching the end of The Dark Knight Rises and missing out on the beginning and middle"

  7. #7
    R.I.P. Dwayne McDuffie Greg Anderson's Avatar
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    if you can still find them, the Hine arcs. #150-174.
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  8. #8

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    Single Issues
    • #10 (Crossing Over)
    • #29 (Father)
    • #30 (The Clan)
    • #57 (The Beast)
    • #90 (Three Uses of the Knife)
    • #93 (The Devil's Banquet)

    Story Arcs
    • #21-24 (The Hunt)
    • #31-32
    • #35-36 (Set Up)
    • #49-53
    • #59-60
    • #78-80
    • #81-85
    • #95-100
    "It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison

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