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  1. #16
    New Member Meta4's Avatar
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    Default Yup, without a doubt....

    In my opinion, alan moore's (and rick veitch's) run on swamp thing is some of my favorite comics work. He seamlessly blended horror, environmentalism, psychedellia, and managed to believably tie it into the 80's DC universe. He turned a muck monster into a nature god, and showed more human emotion through a shambling creature than should have been possible. In my opinion, its one of the highlights of moores career, along with promethea, v for vendetta, and watchmen. I loved his swamp thing run, and would reccomend it highly to any fan of the horror genre.
    Last edited by Meta4; 08-15-2013 at 05:31 PM.

  2. #17
    Junior Member JSA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Meta4 View Post
    In my opinion, alan moore's (and rick veitch's) run on swamp thing is some of my favorite comics work. He seamlessly blended horror, environmentalism, psychedellia, and managed to believably tie it into the 80's DC universe. He turned a muck monster into a nature god, and showed more human emotion through a shambling creature than should have been possible. In my opinion, its one of the highlights of moores career, along with promethea, v for vendetta, and watchmen. I loved his swamp thing run, and would reccomend it highly to any fan of the horror genre.
    About Moore ST. Should have ended sooner. IMO, Swamp thing 53 it was the perfect end. Tragic and beautiful at the same time. anyway... *64 was good, happy end and everybody happy.

    About rick veitch, good artist, but he's definitely not Alan Moore.

  3. #18
    Crusader of Justice dancj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JSA View Post
    About Moore ST. Should have ended sooner. IMO, Swamp thing 53 it was the perfect end. Tragic and beautiful at the same time. anyway... *64 was good, happy end and everybody happy.
    Swamp Thing #53 is one of my favourite issues of anything ever. I do agree that the series went downhill after that, but there were still some good stories. My big issue was that I found Moore's final issue to be not very good at all.

  4. #19

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    Well Alan Moore's run sure is. Previous to that it was much more your standard monster comic, and after that comics they have just been trying to ape Alan Moore, with only a little bit of success.
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  5. #20
    I'm a male DebkoX's Avatar
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    Yes. Even the current series is amazing. Swamp Thing is a gem.
    “The only thing standing between you and your goal is the bullshit story you keep telling yourself as to why you can't achieve it.”

  6. #21
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    Swamp Thing had some pretty amazing artists work on the comic, easily some of the best artwork of the 70s and 80s.

    Bernie Wrightson
    John Totleben
    Steven Bissette

    Those guys were really among the top artists of their time. None to mention other really great artists like Rick Veitch, Alfredo Alcala and even early pencil work by Bo Hampton.

  7. #22

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    As a series, not really. Hellblazer had a stronger, longer run.

    But Alan Moore's run on the title is certainly one of the best runs of any comics in history. As far as ongoings go, only eclipsed by a select few (Doom Patrol, Animal Man, Invisibles, Sandman), and it remains one of my favorites of Moore's body of work.
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  8. #23
    deadboy deadboy80's Avatar
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    I have just started reading Swampthing when DC did the reboot. So far I love it. However, I would like to read old stories also, any suggestions? Trade Paperbacks would be best.

  9. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by deadboy80 View Post
    I have just started reading Swampthing when DC did the reboot. So far I love it. However, I would like to read old stories also, any suggestions? Trade Paperbacks would be best.
    Moore's run.
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  10. #25

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    What I love about Moore's run is that he pretty much tried a different genre each arc. There's some real dark stuff in there - the serial killer issue in particular, can't recall the issue # - mixed with superhero arcs, environmentalism, spirtuality, sci-fi... I even enjoyed even the later, stranger arcs (including the ones not penned by Moore prior to the end of his run). I doubt there has even been as much variety in a comic run that has also managed to maintain such a high level of consistent quality.

  11. #26

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    It's a classic!
    I dont understand what's taking so long to release a Saga of the Swamp Thing OMNIBUS!!
    :(
    currently reading : "The Boys" Definitive Editions; "The Incal" ; "Cable & X-Force" ; "UXM" ; "Castaka / Metabarons" Saga ; Animal Man Omnibus

  12. #27
    New Member Meta4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RicardoRamos View Post
    It's a classic!
    I dont understand what's taking so long to release a Saga of the Swamp Thing OMNIBUS!!
    :(
    Right? I've got all 6 of the hardcover dc released a few years ago, but this run is screaming for a absolute/omnibus edition.

  13. #28
    Universal Turing machine cgh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Desaad View Post
    As a series, not really. Hellblazer had a stronger, longer run.

    But Alan Moore's run on the title is certainly one of the best runs of any comics in history. As far as ongoings go, only eclipsed by a select few (Doom Patrol, Animal Man, Invisibles, Sandman), and it remains one of my favorites of Moore's body of work.
    I hate to be pedantic, but I'd qualify "one of the best runs of any comics in history" to mean "American superhero comics". Let's face it, does it compare to Peanuts, Maus, The Airtight Garage, etc.? Not really. And unlike several other Moore works, it didn't even make The Comics Journal's top 100 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Com...00_Comics_list

    That said, I do love it and have a lot of great memories reading it as a teenager. I thought it was the greatest thing ever.
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  14. #29
    Crusader of Justice dancj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cgh View Post
    Let's face it, does it compare to Peanuts, Maus, The Airtight Garage, etc.? Not really.
    Horses for courses. Personally I think Swamp Think is better than all of those.

  15. #30
    Senior Member Eumenides's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cgh View Post
    I hate to be pedantic, but I'd qualify "one of the best runs of any comics in history" to mean "American superhero comics". Let's face it, does it compare to Peanuts, Maus, The Airtight Garage, etc.? Not really. And unlike several other Moore works, it didn't even make The Comics Journal's top 100 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Com...00_Comics_list
    You're not being pedantic, just as lazy as everyone else contributing to this thread. In the same its defenders take for granted that it's a great run, you take for granted it's not, without any justification. You just think it's a self-evident truth, which overlooks problems on several levels: Swamp Thing has been included in Top 100 Best lists in European comics festivals, with radically different choices than TCJ's. In Europe, with its wider acceptance of fantasy and science-fiction comics in the mainstream, Swamp Thing has better chances of being appreciated than by the true pedants of Fantagraphics who, unexpectedly, pretty much made a list to serve their strict ideology and to display their catalogue. But it's also because Europe is so saturated with science-fantasy comics that The Airtight Garage is a drop in an ocean, just another fine series to add to Valerian and Laureline, Le Cycle de Cyann, Rork, etc. It did not revolutionize a genre and an epoch like Swamp Thing did in American comics. But I confess I never cared much for Moebius' writing, too much new agey nonsense and crystal cult worshiping for my taste.

    Peanuts has stature, undoubtedly, but after seeing the great comic strips of the past - Krazy Kat, Gasoline Alley Little Nemo In Slumberland, etc. - with their gigantic pages that gave their creators room for all sorts of incredible formal experiments, I admit I find the Schultz' rigid panels very conservative. Maybe it's an American thing, if I had been brought up with Charlie Brown and the others I'd care more, but I wasn't so I don't. As for Maus, what is there besides the Holocaust theme? And why not just read Primo Levi instead, a much better writer than Spiegelman? Because Spiegelman the penciller has nothing on the artists who worked on Moore's Swamp Thing, nor did did he ever show the will to experiment with the page as tirelessly as Moore has shown all his career (in spite of not being a penciller). Not to mention there's no Spiegelman after Maus, he's just a one-hit wonder.

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