Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 34
  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    86

    Default What's so great about The Sandman series by Neil Gaiman?

    Hi everyone, I'm new here. Before you get mad at what I have just asked I want to make it clear that I have never read The Sandman... I ask this question because I am trying to get more into comics and want a break from my usual Batman comics. It has been mentioned that The Sandman is one of the best series' out there (some say the best, period) and would like to know why? The premise didn't really appeal to me so I would like some opinions as to why this is such a great series like many have claimed.

  2. #2
    Veteran Member SJNeal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    San Jose, California
    Posts
    7,839

    Default

    What's so great about The Sandman? Pretty much everything.

    But seriously, if you've already done some research and the premise doesn't sound appealing, the only thing I can suggest is try it out and come to your own conclusion.

  3. #3
    Senior Member passer-by's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Sofia, Bulgaria
    Posts
    3,186

    Default

    Agreed, but I'd add that the first 7 issues are not really representative of the story as it unfolds later, so read a few more before making up your mind.

    Even though #4 is one of my favourites.
    I don't know what to consider canon anymore :(
    Comicmofo
    http://forums.comicbookresources.com...1#post17765682

  4. #4
    Senior Member jackdaw53's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,132

    Default

    I'm much more luke warm about Sandman than most.

    I really enjoyed the short punchy tales that related how Dream influenced people via dreams. But... jeez... a lot of the long sweeping story lines where no character resembled a real human personality (or was remotely like-able) on a mix of old and new mythology got more than a tad boring.

    The artwork was consistently good. And there's little else quite like it in comics. That makes it worth giving a read at some point. But I can't see any real reason to make it a "first venture" away from Batman. (Believe OP will fare better by looking for recommended stuff WHERE he does like initial premise.)

  5. #5
    Junior Member harpier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    110

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathanaronda View Post
    Hi everyone, I'm new here. Before you get mad at what I have just asked I want to make it clear that I have never read The Sandman... I ask this question because I am trying to get more into comics and want a break from my usual Batman comics. It has been mentioned that The Sandman is one of the best series' out there (some say the best, period) and would like to know why? The premise didn't really appeal to me so I would like some opinions as to why this is such a great series like many have claimed.

    Sandman was one of my first comic experiences, and I came to it because I greatly enjoyed Neil Gaiman's novels, which can be used as a kind of litmus test for whether or not you'll like his comic output, particularly representative gems like American Gods. If you've not read any, his style is a little difficult to accurately describe, but it is considerably more mythological in tone and subject than most comics, and it's a tone that picks up more and more as the series progresses. As @passer-by mentioned, the first arc-ish is as close to fitting in with the rest of the DC Universe as it ever comes, including cameos by the Justice League and the original Sandman superhero. However, it's the rest that makes it so much fun, including Gaiman's entirely unexpected (if so very, very 90s goth) depiction of Death and an enigmatic characterization of Lucifer, which Mike Carey turned into a very good spin-off for Vertigo.

    And, as @jawdaw53 pointed out, the primary characters develop, but differently than you would expect human characters to. Sandman is very psychologically subtle, and Dream's changes--which he doesn't always see himself--are part of the beauty and continuity of the whole series, but if you're interested in highly dramatic and emotionally fraught superhero-y angst, it's probably not what you're looking for. I would, however, highly recommend trying it. I've known people who weren't as enthusiastic about it as many, but I've yet to know anyone who really dislikes it.

  6. #6
    They LAUGHED at my theory SteveGus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,402

    Default

    I'm not a fan; I found most of the characters not particularly convincing as characters. I've dipped into it at times; a lot of it reads like some medieval courtly love allegory in which Ardor jousts with Despair for the favor of Embarassment-At-Having-Farted. Parts of it are quite dark, and some of those, like the diner scene, which is where I dropped the book when it started coming out in the 80s, are the most narratively straightforward parts of the book.

    If you're coming to this from Batman, before Sandman I'd suggest Sandman Mystery Theatre or Transmetropolitan. They, too, are considered classics, and aren't quite as off-putting as I found Sandman.

    And take heed that as of this day I am an official Vertigo Snob. I'd never have thought that the last DC books I'd end up buying regularly would turn out to be Fairest and Astro City.
    Superhero comic books only become art to the extent that their banal, unrealistic fantasy and garish styles go too far and become interesting. Attempts to ground them in reality can only ruin them.

  7. #7
    Crusader of Justice dancj's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Sunny Exeter, England
    Posts
    6,736

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jackdaw53 View Post
    The artwork was consistently good.
    I can't agree with that at all. There is some great art in there - especially in The Kindly Ones. Overall though, I find the art in Sandman to be incredibly erratic and often downright bad.

  8. #8

    Default

    I thought the same about the art as dancj but thought it got better after each arc when I was reading it.
    But now looking at the issues, I don't think they were so bad. Some of the first ones, sure.
    BB

  9. #9
    New Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    NZ
    Posts
    79

    Default

    I am a huge Sandman fan and came into the series quite late. I didn't really start reading it until the Essential Sandman reprints started coming out all those years ago.

    I would recommend the series if you are a fan of fantasy, mythology, religious literature, as it incorporates all of these genres. It's very creative yet relatable, and I can't recall a bad issue in the whole run. As harpier said though, if you are looking for something superhero-y this is probably not something that will fit, but I'd still give it a try. :)

  10. #10

    Default

    I think it's easier to criticize than to compliment, and I don't mean as part of human nature. I mean I can think of bad stories with flaws like there were plot holes, or the characters lacked inner life, etc.. But with the Sandman all I can say is it's close to perfect. You have to like fantasy enough to like Lord of the Rings, and the art isn't perfect.
    That's the worst I can come up with. If it's not the best comic story it is in the running, just read it man.
    Batgirl, Superman/Wonder Woman, Detective Comics, Worlds Finest, Batman/Superman, The Movement, Astro City, Kick Ass 3, Miracle Man, Nightcrawler, Red Sonja, The Star Wars, Sandman: Overture, The Maxx

  11. #11
    B.P.R.D Agent lex1126's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    singapore
    Posts
    245

    Default

    this series is great because it is an excellent topic to pick up chicks. :D

  12. #12
    Junior Member Rory426's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Bolton, England
    Posts
    409

    Default

    I've read the first 8 volumes and bought the last two this week. I think the thing that I've enjoyed about The Sandman is the pure scope of the thing. It's a huge story, and I don't mean that in page count. Gaiman has this ability to handle so many characters, themes, levels of existence even. These Endless beings, longer-lasting and more powerful even than Gods it seems, right down to mere mortals, all feel real and fell fleshed-out, even if we meet them for less than an issue. Gaiman's talent for telling stories really comes to the fore in 'World's End' for example.

    Art-wise it's varied but all good IMO. Some of it is very much of-its-time, it seems, but there's some really excellent stuff. The new edition TPs are gorgeous too IMO.
    Currently enjoying: Batman, Detective Comics, American Vampire, Saga, The Wake, Letter 44, The Manhattan Projects, Atomic Robo, East of West, Ghosted, FBP...

  13. #13
    Junior Member Etoma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Zambia, Africa
    Posts
    439

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rory426 View Post
    I've read the first 8 volumes and bought the last two this week. I think the thing that I've enjoyed about The Sandman is the pure scope of the thing. It's a huge story, and I don't mean that in page count. Gaiman has this ability to handle so many characters, themes, levels of existence even. These Endless beings, longer-lasting and more powerful even than Gods it seems, right down to mere mortals, all feel real and fell fleshed-out, even if we meet them for less than an issue. Gaiman's talent for telling stories really comes to the fore in 'World's End' for example.

    Art-wise it's varied but all good IMO. Some of it is very much of-its-time, it seems, but there's some really excellent stuff. The new edition TPs are gorgeous too IMO.
    This pretty much sums it up for me. Gaiman built universes and mythologies that mix with our own to create a comic experience that is so vast and so beautiful and so tragic. And Gaiman did all this with such skill and poetry that never does it feel old or worn through out the 75 issues.
    The bird of Hermes is my name, eating my wings to make me tame
    .

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Etoma View Post
    This pretty much sums it up for me. Gaiman built universes and mythologies that mix with our own to create a comic experience that is so vast and so beautiful and so tragic. And Gaiman did all this with such skill and poetry that never does it feel old or worn through out the 75 issues.
    Though Sandman wasn't my first comic experience, it was one of the first that I could "connect" with as a reader. I actually rented all of the volumes from the local library and read them pretty much straight through. When I finished the series, I grieved because I had reached the end of Gaiman's story and I couldn't read anymore. That was it. It's interesting because now when I read comics, I unconsciously look for the subtleties that writers interject into their stories, whether they're quotes from famous authors or parallels. Yes, many times they're not there -- but to me, that is the lasting legacy that Gaiman had on my reading experience. I used to not do this before and it's surprising to see how much of what's written goes unnoticed or gets lost in translation

    Anyway, just a personal note on why I think Sandman is "all that". I have to agree with the few who have mentioned the art -- I personally think it's bad, but not bad enough to detract from the storytelling. Really looking forward to those two omnibuses that are coming out this year.

  15. #15
    Junior Member Darth Howie's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    138

    Default

    Sandman is imagination in its purest form. Can't think of anything else that can or should be said about it. Read it.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •