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  1. #1
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    Default REVIEW: All-New X-Men, #11

    In "All-New X-Men" #11 by Brian Michael Bendis and Stuart Immonen, one of the time-displaced original give X-Men decides to join current-day Cyclops' mutant revolution, and the resulting tug-of-war causes more than one character to behave badly.


    Full review here.

  2. #2
    "You can go" Askani's Flame's Avatar
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    It's a drawn-out, overly pat and obvious attempt to show that the former surrogate mother/child relationship between Kitty and Jean Grey has flipped, with Kitty now admonishing and comforting the adolescent Jean who has been "acting out."
    When was Jean EVER surrogate mother to Kitty? Wouldn't that be Storm?
    darknessatnoon: I knew you were the only reasonable R'Chell Summers fan.

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    What is, is. antiochene's Avatar
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    Wow. Apparently this issue was all about Emma Frost, the mean, nasty, sadistic cow. Is the ANXM I thought I read from an alternate universe or something?

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    ❤ Walking with thee ❤ Ian Pressman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by antiochene View Post
    Wow. Apparently this issue was all about Emma Frost, the mean, nasty, sadistic cow. Is the ANXM I thought I read from an alternate universe or something?
    You can't be surprised that Emma would provoke that sort of reaction. She was all seething looks, and anger. The finger snap "End scene," bit was pretty disrespectful, too. Jean had it coming, but Emma's reasoning was hypocritical, so it all balances out.
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    F&*k BOTA!!! Hariel0079's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Pressman View Post
    You can't be surprised that Emma would provoke that sort of reaction. She was all seething looks, and anger. The finger snap "End scene," bit was pretty disrespectful, too. Jean had it coming, but Emma's reasoning was hypocritical, so it all balances out.
    One way to look at it but yea pretty much.

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    A Goddess amongst mortals celestialbodies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by antiochene View Post
    Wow. Apparently this issue was all about Emma Frost, the mean, nasty, sadistic cow. Is the ANXM I thought I read from an alternate universe or something?

    Did we read the same review, the reviewer spoke highly of what Emma did, but took the time to point out one of the reasons Emma would jump at the opportunity to "discipline" Jeen is because of her insecurities surrounding Adult Jean. And I don't think some of the lesson Emma was teaching was a slight bit bitterness from her interactions with Jean hence her attitude throughout the ordeal.

  7. #7
    What is, is. antiochene's Avatar
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    Bendis' handling of that old rivalry is one of the strongest parts of this tug-of-war. Cat-fights over a man are soap-opera-ish, but Bendis makes this scene is exceptional. Emma Frost shows no qualms about using a larger mission or the need for "teaching" as an excuse to mete out some personal pain-dealing. Likewise, she sees nothing remiss about transferring her dislike and jealousy of the adult, long-gone Jean to the younger, time-displaced teenage Jean.

    I read the review. I am not what one would call an Emma fan - I read books with her in it and enjoy them, but not generally for her - but you might notice that the reviewer spends most of a paragraph slamming Emma and doesn't say a word about what actions of Jean's actually provoked the response. Emma's 'less than moral moves' were hardly the driving force of that scene. I prefer reviewers who at least pretend to keep their biases on a leash, or at least openly admit them instead of writing their review to obscure what actually happened in the book.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Askani's Flame View Post
    When was Jean EVER surrogate mother to Kitty? Wouldn't that be Storm?
    It's BS. They have no relationship other than bitter hatred.

  9. #9
    A Goddess amongst mortals celestialbodies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by antiochene View Post
    Bendis' handling of that old rivalry is one of the strongest parts of this tug-of-war. Cat-fights over a man are soap-opera-ish, but Bendis makes this scene is exceptional. Emma Frost shows no qualms about using a larger mission or the need for "teaching" as an excuse to mete out some personal pain-dealing. Likewise, she sees nothing remiss about transferring her dislike and jealousy of the adult, long-gone Jean to the younger, time-displaced teenage Jean.

    I read the review. I am not what one would call an Emma fan - I read books with her in it and enjoy them, but not generally for her - but you might notice that the reviewer spends most of a paragraph slamming Emma and doesn't say a word about what actions of Jean's actually provoked the response. Emma's 'less than moral moves' were hardly the driving force of that scene. I prefer reviewers who at least pretend to keep their biases on a leash, or at least openly admit them instead of writing their review to obscure what actually happened in the book.

    Despite these less than moral moves, she comes out the winner of the interaction in more than one way. It's a great moment that sums a lot of the contradictions and attractions of the character of Emma Frost.

    and then a heavy-handed four-page heart-to-heart between Kitty and teenage Jean. This conversation is clearly meant to be touching and wise. Kitty even brings up Spider-Man's motto. It comes off more as clichéd and unnecessary. It's a drawn-out, overly pat and obvious attempt to show that the former surrogate mother/child relationship between Kitty and Jean Grey has flipped, with Kitty now admonishing and comforting the adolescent Jean who has been "acting out."


    I thought the first one and the second one more than made up for that, Jeen was undoubtedly wrong I think perhaps the reviewer was trying to get into Emma's head and explain her motivations for seemingly enjoying what she was doing even tho she was right. In story we are able to see exactly why and how Jean is and wrong and she comes off looking like a bully and its explained why which is why the reviewer I'd didn't focus on that.
    Last edited by celestialbodies; 05-03-2013 at 03:09 PM.

  10. #10
    What is, is. antiochene's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by celestialbodies View Post
    Despite these less than moral moves, she comes out the winner of the interaction in more than one way. It's a great moment that sums a lot of the contradictions and attractions of the character of Emma Frost.

    and then a heavy-handed four-page heart-to-heart between Kitty and teenage Jean. This conversation is clearly meant to be touching and wise. Kitty even brings up Spider-Man's motto. It comes off more as clichéd and unnecessary. It's a drawn-out, overly pat and obvious attempt to show that the former surrogate mother/child relationship between Kitty and Jean Grey has flipped, with Kitty now admonishing and comforting the adolescent Jean who has been "acting out."


    I thought the first one and the second one more than made up for that, Jeen was undoubtedly wrong I think perhaps the reviewer was trying to get into Emma's head and explain her motivations for seemingly enjoying what she was doing even tho she was right. In story we are able to see exactly why and how Jean is and wrong and she comes off looking like a bully and its explained why which is why the reviewer I'd didn't focus on that.
    My point is, that scene wasn't about Emma; it was part of Jean's character arc. The reviewer misses the point completely, in favor of taking the most wildly over-the-top negative interpretation possible of Emma's motivations. The compliment that comes after is some token nod towards objectivity, not borne out by anything else s/he says. It's a crummy review, and clearly the reviewer has no clue what they're talking about when it comes to past character dynamics either, given the surrogate-mother comment.

  11. #11
    ~MagiKat~ Kaiolino's Avatar
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    I was shocked that this review didn't come from Kelly Thompson.

  12. #12
    A Goddess amongst mortals celestialbodies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by antiochene View Post
    My point is, that scene wasn't about Emma; it was part of Jean's character arc. The reviewer misses the point completely, in favor of taking the most wildly over-the-top negative interpretation possible of Emma's motivations. The compliment that comes after is some token nod towards objectivity, not borne out by anything else s/he says. It's a crummy review, and clearly the reviewer has no clue what they're talking about when it comes to past character dynamics either, given the surrogate-mother comment.

    But that's the thing everyone isn't going to interpret the scene the way you or I do and that's the point, just as you took it as mostly about Jean it was plenty about Emma too. Was it Emma the one in need of a lesson to learn no but the entire exchange did give a unique insight into Emma's motivations how much did Emma really care about Jean learning a lesson versus how much was to punish the Adult Jean as Emma maybe would of always liked to.

    Your not wrong however, the reviewer could of spent time talking about the catalyst of why Emma had to admonish Jean in the first place through the Cuckoos. But it's always intriguing to me several people can look at the same thing and have several different opinions about it I totally get where your coming from. But I also think this interpretation is also valid and allows for focus on another aspect of the scene that most people probably either didn't or won't acknowledge.

  13. #13

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    My favorite surrogate relationship is Storm Jubilee, X-Factor # 3987-92

  14. #14
    What is, is. antiochene's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by celestialbodies View Post
    But that's the thing everyone isn't going to interpret the scene the way you or I do and that's the point, just as you took it as mostly about Jean it was plenty about Emma too. Was it Emma the one in need of a lesson to learn no but the entire exchange did give a unique insight into Emma's motivations how much did Emma really care about Jean learning a lesson versus how much was to punish the Adult Jean as Emma maybe would of always liked to.

    Your not wrong however, the reviewer could of spent time talking about the catalyst of why Emma had to admonish Jean in the first place through the Cuckoos. But it's always intriguing to me several people can look at the same thing and have several different opinions about it I totally get where your coming from. But I also think this interpretation is also valid and allows for focus another aspect of the scene that most people probably either didn't or won't acknowledge.
    I don't think there's anything wrong with conceding that Emma probably enjoyed that a little more than was actually good for her, even if she wasn't dishing it out herself; I don't actually doubt that for an instant. But to me, the review fundamentally misrepresents what was in the issue. Possibly it was unintentional - maybe Emma's reaction was the only thing the reviewer felt justifying in 'spoiling', hence the disproportionate amount of detail - but it doesn't come across very effectively. (By the way, I'm not arguing with you so much as just expressing my opinion in case the reviewer is reading. I do take your point about differing interpretations.)

  15. #15
    A Goddess amongst mortals celestialbodies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by antiochene View Post
    I don't think there's anything wrong with conceding that Emma probably enjoyed that a little more than was actually good for her, even if she wasn't dishing it out herself; I don't actually doubt that for an instant. But to me, the review fundamentally misrepresents what was in the issue. Possibly it was unintentional - maybe Emma's reaction was the only thing the reviewer felt justifying in 'spoiling', hence the disproportionate amount of detail - but it doesn't come across very effectively. (By the way, I'm not arguing with you so much as just expressing my opinion in case the reviewer is reading. I do take your point about differing interpretations.)

    Now this is refreshing especially here, you can't have a different opinion without being labeled this or that, but I do see your point the reviewer focused moreso on Emma than the actual reason Emma's was behaving which were set in motion by what Jean had done. I think that in hindsight if the reviewer explained what Jean did and how her actions forced Emma's hands then reading what the reviewer said about Emma may have been a tad bit more smoother.

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