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  1. #1
    We have become death Deviates's Avatar
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    Default Historically accurate/relevant comics

    I teach secondary school History (focusing on British History from 1066 up until modern day and German History between World War I and World War II). Recently I've managed to use the excellent Maus during the German history segment to emphasise certain significances of the time and the effects on individuals of living in such a time. It worked fantastically and so I was wondering if anyone was aware of any other such comics that could be used in such a way?
    Last edited by Deviates; 02-10-2013 at 10:33 AM.
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    They call me Mr. Pip! the4thpip's Avatar
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    Bourbon Island 1730 is available in English. I wrote a review about it a few years ago:

    http://the4thpip.blogspot.de/2008/10...land-1730.html
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  3. #3

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    Is Secondary school like American middle school? I'm not sure what age group your teaching to but there is some interesting stuff. Everything from Nelson Mandela to Madame Curie.

    Non-fiction Comics, Memoirs, and Historical Graphic Novels

    Comic Books as Journalism: 10 Masterpieces of Graphic Nonfiction
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  4. #4
    Senior Member MartinNL's Avatar
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    Pretty much any Joe Sacco book. Also Satrapi's Persepolis and to a lesser extent Abirached's A Game for Swallows. Tardi's It was the war of the trenches also deals with WW1 and his new book that hasn't been translated into English yet I, René Tardi, Prisoner in Stalag IIB is about Tardi's father's memories about his time in a WW2 nazi camp. Keep an eye out for that last one since I think it's even better than It was the war of the trenches.

    More adventurous, but dealing with subjects such as different cultures and slavery are some Corto Maltese books.

    Also dunno if this video works from Britain, but this documentary might be interesting. The voice-over is in Dutch, but there are interviews with American, Japanese and French creators (none of it is dubbed). http://cultuurgids.avro.nl/front/det...l?item=8251796 The whole video is about journalistic comics and mainly deal about war situations. Most of it fiction, but based on true historical events. Check it out I'd say. It has interviews with Joe Sacco (Palestine), Joe Kubert (Fax from Sarajevo), Marjane Satrapi (Persepolis), Keji Nakazawa (Barefoot Gen) and many others. If the video doesn't work maybe try the stealthy add-in in Firefox.

  5. #5
    Wait...I know you. Captain Clarkie's Avatar
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    Garth Ennis's War Stories and Battlefields are good for WW2.
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  6. #6
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    Warren Ellis's OGN Crécy, about the eponymous battle, is fantastic. Probably inappropriate for school, but well worth a read.
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  7. #7
    We have become death Deviates's Avatar
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    Thanks for the suggestions, looks like a lot for me to check out which is great. In reply to the earlier question of what ages I teach, it's 11-18 though the focus tends to be 11-16.
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  8. #8
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    Northlanders is about viikings, looks legit to me aside from the high body count.

  9. #9
    Member Puppetmaker Grae's Avatar
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    Charlie's War by Pat Mills and Joe Colquhoun is worth a look at for WW I.

  10. #10
    ich liebe Leni stelok's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deviates View Post
    I teach secondary school History (focusing on British History from 1066 up until modern day and German History between World War I and World War I). Recently I've managed to use the excellent Maus during the German history segment to emphasise certain significances of the time and the effects on individuals of living in such a time. It worked fantastically and so I was wondering if anyone was aware of any other such comics that could be used in such a way?
    What is the difference between World War I and World War I? Or do you mean the World War II?

    The German history period between two World Wars is called Weimar Republic because the post-Reich German government was founded in the town of Weimar.

    1066? Eh That is the year when William the Conqueror and his French army won the Battle of Hastings and conquered Britain.

    I recommend that you see both the anime and manga of Hetalia, which covers a lot of interesting topics on German, Italian, British, French, Russian, Swiss, Austrian, Hungarian, Spanish and the rest of European histories as well as the U.S. and Canadian histories. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hetalia
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  11. #11
    We have become death Deviates's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stelok View Post
    What is the difference between World War I and World War I? Or do you mean the World War II?

    The German history period between two World Wars is called Weimar Republic because the post-Reich German government was founded in the town of Weimar.

    1066? Eh That is the year when William the Conqueror and his French army won the Battle of Hastings and conquered Britain.

    I recommend that you see both the anime and manga of Hetalia, which covers a lot of interesting topics on German, Italian, British, French, Russian, Swiss, Austrian, Hungarian, Spanish and the rest of European histories as well as the U.S. and Canadian histories. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hetalia

    Other than starting off as a great exercise in pedantry I don't understand your post. I'm aware what happened between the wars in Germany, and also what happened in 1066.... I teach it.
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  12. #12
    Hell yeah! Kees_L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deviates View Post
    I teach secondary school History (focusing on British History from 1066 up until modern day and German History between World War I and World War I). Recently I've managed to use the excellent Maus during the German history segment to emphasise certain significances of the time and the effects on individuals of living in such a time. It worked fantastically and so I was wondering if anyone was aware of any other such comics that could be used in such a way?
    I'm sure all the answers given here may be helping you greatly and I fully commend them both as your excellent question.
    I hope I can put into words what I mean here, on the risk of telling you stuff you'd already be to know!
    But my advice would be to extend and variate your search as much as you can.

    Because search distinctions like 'historical' or 'historically correct' might not always prove to work as well as one would expect?

    Or perhaps will in some or more cases not all comics or 'bandes dessinées' pop up as readily as 'Maus' for being seminal or helpful historical sources.
    I'd say that an enormous range of stories and books would contain some excellent historical aspects or settings, despite containing other aspects as well, which might get attributed to more readily?
    Hergé's Tintin for example gets attributed to being a line of "bandes dessinées", both as a "newspaper strip", plus as being a comic. It features characters, yet also historic themes and aspects in cases. Deemably historically correct, I'd say.

    Or look at it this way:
    even despite the fact of "Maus" proving an excellent example, there will be more excellent examples along the same topic, such as Bernie Krigstein's "Master Race" a story for EC comics' Impact. A fine and seminal example of a comics tale on the subject, eventhough Kurtzman's Maus may be known more widely or more specifically as being a comics work.

    A number of European comics are made or seek appeal as being to illustrate or draw upon historical(ly correct) themes or settings, eventhough what they'd depict would receive or take up such acclaim much more rather than the comic or story title itself.
    Tardi both as a number of comics creators get attributed with doing excellent "literature-adaptations", but their works would stand out as being fine comics examples on their own, even despite proving or seeming adaptations of sorts.

    Like if you google 'comics' you'd get a lot of characters or titles.
    Search for 'historical comics' you might end up with a lot of Ivanhoe adaptations, or stuff with "classic historic" as actually in the title. Or literature adaptations.
    Eventhough there would still be existing far more stuff than that. Like even Donald Duck as being Ivanhoe - although for your own specific classes or lessons other Donald Duck stories might prove to be suiting you even better! Let alone any of the other comics that would exist out there?

    Which works both ways: even pretty boring or flimsy seeming comics might prove illustrative and educational notwithstanding?
    Like Ivanhoe: eventhough Ivanhoe may seem a pretty dull or oldfashioned kind of tale it may still prove to illustrate stuff?
    Especially since Ivanhoe would not be historical for being about knights or such, but primarily because historically it'd be a key literal device of itself more rather. Working as proving illustrative visually as well as thematically, pretty much?
    Been called a 'good egg'. Been told to rock, been told to steady myself. Been told to (please) be goin' places.
    Chillingly good stuff besides Mignola, Slint, M, Knut and really big chunks of tinfoil?
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  13. #13
    Wait...I know you. Captain Clarkie's Avatar
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    and if we're being pedants Stelok, William only conquered England.
    'Authorities say the phony Pope can be recognized by his high-top sneakers and incredibly foul mouth.'

  14. #14
    Hell yeah! Kees_L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deviates View Post
    Other than starting off as a great exercise in pedantry I don't understand your post. I'm aware what happened between the wars in Germany, and also what happened in 1066.... I teach it.
    Maybe Stelok would be intent on specifically pointing towards manga moreso than just comics in general.
    If so then I'd be calling such pretty much unwarranted and pedant-seeming on its own.

    I have nothing against manga, but not all manga immediately equates to being excellent comics.
    And eventhough there would exist manga involving historical stuff that wouldn't mean any of it to being great examples automatically.

    That said, maybe Stelok basically means well but is just infatuated with favorites of his rather particularly?
    Last edited by Kees_L; 02-10-2013 at 12:02 PM.
    Been called a 'good egg'. Been told to rock, been told to steady myself. Been told to (please) be goin' places.
    Chillingly good stuff besides Mignola, Slint, M, Knut and really big chunks of tinfoil?
    Half sunk in the mud, with one eye showing / a cracked smile and hair still growing /
    your hands miles apart, as if they'd never met / you were the happiest I'd seen you yet
    . ~
    (full) lyrics to 'Exhume' by Bedhead.

  15. #15
    the monster weeks's Avatar
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    it was war in the trenches by jacques tardi is a great look at WWI through the eyes of the soldier.
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