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Thread: The Invisibles

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    Default The Invisibles

    How is Grant Morrison's Invisibles? i wanted to check it out. What is it about? Thank you

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    It's about a multi-dimensional alien conspiracy that controls the world and how a secret resistance called the Invisibles fights it.

    Seriously, if you are newer to Morrison, don't start with Invisibles. Try New X-Men and JLA first, and then after that Seven Soldiers. Those should ease you in to his surreal style of writing.

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    Lazer Faced Goggindowner's Avatar
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    I always say and recommend this, but I would also check out his Doom Patrol, maybe even before the others Holmes mentioned. From what I have read, they have a very similar feel (read all of DP, a bit of Invisibles).

    I will say that though I enjoyed Invisibles, I didn't like it as much as his other work.
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    Yeah I think New X-Men works as a precursor to Doom Patrol and Invisibles, because it has a lot of the same themes as those books, but it's much less weird and surreal, and more superhero-y. It's no doubt a weaker book than those two, but it works as a gateway so-to-speak.

    JLA is probably the simplest thing he's done, and it has some thematic tie-in with Invisibles.

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    Senior Member Coyote2010's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Holmes View Post
    Yeah I think New X-Men works as a precursor to Doom Patrol and Invisibles, because it has a lot of the same themes as those books, but it's much less weird and surreal, and more superhero-y. It's no doubt a weaker book than those two, but it works as a gateway so-to-speak.

    JLA is probably the simplest thing he's done, and it has some thematic tie-in with Invisibles.

    I tried to read Doom Patrol, but it was too odd. I think there was a group of villains called the Dadaists!

    Invisibles I read the first three volumes but I felt loss.

    New X Men I just loved, almost as much as JLA but the rotating artists really knocked me out. My first exposure to Quitely I think.

    I want to get into the Invisibles badly though because that hard cover onmnibus is just too sweet.

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    Crusader of Justice dancj's Avatar
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    The Invisibles is mostly good, but the final volume completely lost me. I barely understood a word of it.

    IMO The Filth is a very similar style of book by Morrison, but much more successful.

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    I loved the Invisibles, but like Doom Patrol it can feel a bit unfocused for the sheer amount of conceptual and thematic ground it wants to cover. Still, it DOES all fit together quite elegantly, and thematic resonances are seen throughout.

    Books like Doom Patrol and Invisibles, with their indefinite run time, were really Grant Morrison speaking directly to the reader, sharing with them the things he loved, that were influencing him at the time. These are not books honed to a razors edge of focus, direction, purpose. It's very much the journey, rather than the destination, and no two books have really opened me up to as many ideas and influences as those two.

    In many ways I do think "The Filth" is a more successful distillation of the ideas Morrison put forth in Doom Patrol and Invisibles (along with, one could argue, Flex Mentallo), but they lose something for the size, you know? I LIKE the free flowing structure, the sheer gross tonnage and diversity of concept put forth by Doom Patrol and the Invisibles, which cannot be matched by any of Morrison's other work.

    Certainly Morrison has done more elegant work in his day, executionally, but I don't think he's done anything quite as insightful, balanced, and intellectual as Doom Patrol or Invisibles (more Doom Patrol than Invisibles, really).
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    Junior Member Bob Fett's Avatar
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    Just get it.You won't be disappointed.

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    Senior Member Coyote2010's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Desaad View Post
    I loved the Invisibles, but like Doom Patrol it can feel a bit unfocused for the sheer amount of conceptual and thematic ground it wants to cover. Still, it DOES all fit together quite elegantly, and thematic resonances are seen throughout.

    Books like Doom Patrol and Invisibles, with their indefinite run time, were really Grant Morrison speaking directly to the reader, sharing with them the things he loved, that were influencing him at the time. These are not books honed to a razors edge of focus, direction, purpose. It's very much the journey, rather than the destination, and no two books have really opened me up to as many ideas and influences as those two.

    In many ways I do think "The Filth" is a more successful distillation of the ideas Morrison put forth in Doom Patrol and Invisibles (along with, one could argue, Flex Mentallo), but they lose something for the size, you know? I LIKE the free flowing structure, the sheer gross tonnage and diversity of concept put forth by Doom Patrol and the Invisibles, which cannot be matched by any of Morrison's other work.

    Certainly Morrison has done more elegant work in his day, executionally, but I don't think he's done anything quite as insightful, balanced, and intellectual as Doom Patrol or Invisibles (more Doom Patrol than Invisibles, really).

    I may need to reread Doom Patrol. I think the first four volumes of the Invisibles are fairly linear, King Mob's transformation is easy enough to follow, but I could not tell you today what exactly The Filfth was about. Flex Mentallo, I got, it was inspiring (!) but the Filfth was too strange. It's about the same thing as Mentallo isn't it, fictional character enters the real world? I am not sure how all the pieces fit, but I think that's a strength with Morrison. I don't need all the pieces to fit, but when I am totally lost it loses impact.

    I should re-read the first Invisibles volumes, but I do know I dismissed it a bit because the early art reminded me of Gaimans Brief Lives, and in my eyes it suffered by comparison.

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    Savior of the Universe Flash Gordon's Avatar
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    The Invisibles is one of my favorite comic books. Totally in my top 5 Morrison list, maybe even number one.

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    Crusader of Justice dancj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coyote2010 View Post
    I don't need all the pieces to fit, but when I am totally lost it loses impact.
    Yeah. With The Filth, Flex Mentallo and most of The Invisibles I definitely didn't grasp everything, but I was there enough to still really enjoy the stories. With the final volume of The Invisibles I was so completely lost that I couldn't find anything to enjoy.

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    Crusader of Justice dancj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coyote2010 View Post
    I should re-read the first Invisibles volumes, but I do know I dismissed it a bit because the early art reminded me of Gaimans Brief Lives, and in my eyes it suffered by comparison.
    That'll be the Jill Thompson art in the Marquis de Sade storyline. Horrendously ugly work.

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    Cute.5 Aaron King's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dancj View Post
    That'll be the Jill Thompson art in the Marquis de Sade storyline. Horrendously ugly work.
    That's also the Fanny origin arc, right? It's one of my favorites. I love the art. Sketchy and dirty and never committing to a real shape, just like Fanny and Orlando and time travel and de Sade.
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    Junior Member Rotm's Avatar
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    Invisibles is a vehicle for Morrison's, I want to say religion(?) but that term comes with preconceptions. I enjoyed it regardless when I read it when I didn't know so much, slowly making my way through it again now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron King View Post
    That's also the Fanny origin arc, right? It's one of my favorites. I love the art. Sketchy and dirty and never committing to a real shape, just like Fanny and Orlando and time travel and de Sade.
    Same artist, but a different arc. There's about half a trade seperating them.
    'The marquis. Well, you know, to be honest, he seems a little bit dodgy to me.'
    'Mm,' she agreed. 'He's a little bit dodgy in the same way that rats are a little bit covered in fur."

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