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  1. #1

    Default publishing quality

    What resolution and dimensions should my comics be in order to be publishing quality?

  2. #2

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    If you're talking about print, the general rule of thumb is the dpi should be twice the screen frequency of the press. HOWEVER, as someone that worked in print and has done a lot of scanning line art, that general rule is really only optimal for photograph reproduction. When you combine line art with screens, you get noticeable crisper reproduction the higher you go, especially if you have fine line work such as the likes that Perez creates. (an interesting experiment, take your signature with a fine pen, scan it in as a halftone at a real high resolution, around 1200 dpi. Save the file several times: 75 dpi, 300 dpi, 600 dpi and 1200 dpi then print them. Even on a home office printer, you'll see a definite difference in clarity between them)

  3. #3
    Junior Member Bill Angus's Avatar
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    If you're talking specifically about line art, I would recommend scanning it lineart, at 1200 dpi. I would strongly discourage scanning lineart as greyscale/halftone.

    If you're talking about anything tonal (or colour, if you happen to be scanning painted work, for example) then I'd suggest you don't need any more than 300-400 dpi.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Angus View Post
    If you're talking specifically about line art, I would recommend scanning it lineart, at 1200 dpi. I would strongly discourage scanning lineart as greyscale/halftone.

    If you're talking about anything tonal (or colour, if you happen to be scanning painted work, for example) then I'd suggest you don't need any more than 300-400 dpi.
    1200 dpi is probably overkill, there are very few people producing lines by hand that fine especially if they are working at a larger than final printing size. As far as scanning, if you scan something as line-art, then the scanner is doing the conversion for you. You have greater control scanning as grayscale, then playing with levels, and unsharp masks to maximize line quality before converting it to bitmap through photoshop.

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    Junior Member Bill Angus's Avatar
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    Agreed - 1200 dpi works best at print size (though I know many illustrators who do it regardless).

    As to scanning as lineart versus scanning grayscale and converting, in my experience you're just adding a lot of extra work for yourself with very little, if anything, gained. I know very few people who do it this way, and never did so when I was doing production work for newspapers, magazines, or comics.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Angus View Post
    Agreed - 1200 dpi works best at print size (though I know many illustrators who do it regardless).

    As to scanning as lineart versus scanning grayscale and converting, in my experience you're just adding a lot of extra work for yourself with very little, if anything, gained. I know very few people who do it this way, and never did so when I was doing production work for newspapers, magazines, or comics.
    All I can say is that in my own lengthy experience in doing production work for the newspaper and its subsidiary publications, I often saw large difference and willing to do the extra work separated me from the crowd and made me the go-to person of the company's image techs (and #2 and 3 were trained by me). Sure, if you're starting off with bold, dark lines such as a good quality simple black ink logo, not much is going to be gained. But, that's the kind of stuff you can get by scanning at 300 and 400 dpi too. Scanning in sketched artwork or trying to capture the fine dots of something with a printed screen, I found that a lot was gained in the finer lines and detail by doing the extra work. If you need the higher resolutions, you probably want to do the extra work. The important thing is that no one method is necessarily the best method. It depends so much on the quality and size of the original graphic, the final goal and limitations/capabilities of the final medium vs the importance of speed over quality. And, the capability of your computer and software to handle large files.

    Also consider that most flatbed scanners are already faking it when scanning in at large resolutions which is another reason to retain some of the control over what it does and does not drop out. When I used a drum scanner to scan in multiple camera ready ads at a time and all at 1200 dpi, those I did as line art. But, the drum scanner is specifically designed for accuracy at the extremely high resolution and the originals were either on slick white photographic paper or from film. And the goal there was to input as many ads as possible that are already considered "done" and approved for production quality, not to spend time individually optimizing or improve on what was given to us. With everything transferring to digital, I doubt the paper still has the drum scanner. There's probably very little that comes in that needs to be that accurately scanned in at such high resolution.

  7. #7
    Senior Member dr chimp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nalcolmjean View Post
    What resolution and dimensions should my comics be in order to be publishing quality?
    http://ka-blam.com/printing/front/?cat=11

    heres some templates and tech specs for digital printing comics.
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