Page 7 of 10 FirstFirst ... 345678910 LastLast
Results 91 to 105 of 147
  1. #91
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Lakewood, OH
    Posts
    6,797

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Polar Bear View Post
    The plot was bizarre. Utterly insane. I loved it. I was put in mind of Morrison's observations that he always gets accused of lunacy, but silver age plots were way crazier than anything that would ever occur to him. He's right. It's glorious.
    Glad to see you're finally getting the acquired taste of these old yarns.

  2. #92
    Senior Member Polar Bear's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    College Park, MD
    Posts
    1,240

    Default

    I'd rather think that Weisinger is now "in the groove," figuring out what works, but maybe I am more forgiving than I started out. Hard to know, since I'm me. I grew up on the DC digests reprinting the Weisinger-era Curt Swan stories, and the 1958 stories weren't quite there yet.

    One thing I am very curious about is whether, after the "high" silver age glory, the quality of the stories does indeed decline to the degree that the Schwartz/O'Neil/Swan 1971 soft-reboot was merited.

    Also, today's my one-month anniversary of starting the thread, and I've gone through (my ownership of) three years worth of comics. At that rate--insert quick calculations--I guess it'll be just over eight more months until I'm done. Except it'll be more, because I've decided to include DC Comics Presents after all, and I have a few annuals, mini-series, and treasury editions to include...

    Well, I guess I'll get to 1971 in May, and maybe I'll be done with the entire thread before its one-year anniversary.

    I find it amusing, Shax, that you get the most positive reactions when you put on your angry vibe towards the post-Crisis Superman stories, whereas it's the opposite here. Maybe you just do "angry" better than I do.
    Last edited by Polar Bear; 02-11-2013 at 04:45 AM.
    Anyway, it is cool for you to acquire acrimony of crumbling time on blast this website.
    --best spam ever

  3. #93
    Senior Member JKCarrier's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,724

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Polar Bear View Post
    One thing I am very curious about is whether, after the "high" silver age glory, the quality of the stories does indeed decline to the degree that the Schwartz/O'Neil/Swan 1971 soft-reboot was merited.
    I think it was more a case that they'd run that particular formula into the ground, and readers' tastes were changing.
    -JKC-
    Glorianna - Barbarian adventure! New page every Friday!

  4. #94
    Gotham Guardian Captain Jim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 1998
    Location
    northeastern Ohio
    Posts
    14,241

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JKCarrier View Post
    I think it was more a case that they'd run that particular formula into the ground, and readers' tastes were changing.
    I agree; especially the latter. Don't forget, Marvel had begun their super-hero line in the early 1960's, and there was a slow but steady exodus of readers from DC to Marvel (speaking as one of them myself). With the advent of Marvel's more character-driven and realistic approach, the formula that had worked so well for DC for many years was no longer attracting readers. I believe Superman was still the best-selling comic book in the early 1960's; by the end of the decade it had dropped off the cliff in face of the impending sales march by Marvel.
    Jim Zimmerman
    Co-moderator, CBR Batman Forum

  5. #95
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Lakewood, OH
    Posts
    6,797

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Polar Bear View Post
    I find it amusing, Shax, that you get the most positive reactions when you put on your angry vibe towards the post-Crisis Superman stories, whereas it's the opposite here. Maybe you just do "angry" better than I do.
    Nah, I only get a positive reaction when others see validity in my anger. My rants against Denny O'Neil in my Batman reviews thread get, at worst, angry tirades in response and, at best, no reaction at all. Still, I make them because I feel I'm right, as should you if the same is true.

  6. #96
    Cute.5 Aaron King's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Mipple City, MN
    Posts
    1,498

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shaxper View Post
    Nah, I only get a positive reaction when others see validity in my anger. My rants against Denny O'Neil in my Batman reviews thread get, at worst, angry tirades in response and, at best, no reaction at all. Still, I make them because I feel I'm right, as should you if the same is true.
    I love all your angry tirades. I just feel weird disrupting a review thread with "I liked that review," especially when I haven't even read the tirade in question.

    All the review threads here have made me start rereading my own comics and keep a reading journal. It's been a lot of fun. I hope to see the threads keep going.
    All-Star Western, Casanova, Criminal, Daredevil, Dark Horse Presents, Funnies, Hellboy/BPRD, King City, Orc Stain, Snarked, Unwritten, Usagi Yojimbo

  7. #97
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Lakewood, OH
    Posts
    6,797

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron King View Post
    I love all your angry tirades. I just feel weird disrupting a review thread with "I liked that review," especially when I haven't even read the tirade in question.
    Yeah. Praise can be such a bother

    All the review threads here have made me start rereading my own comics and keep a reading journal. It's been a lot of fun.
    Very cool. Truthfully, that's the same reason I do the review threads. The responses are definitely a nice secondary motivator, but I do it primarily to make me more conscious in my consumption of comics and to record my thoughts so that I can find them again later in case I can't remember what I thought about a story.

    I've truly found that I take longer to read comics and appreciate them better since I started my first review thread.

  8. #98
    Senior Member Polar Bear's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    College Park, MD
    Posts
    1,240

    Default April 1961

    "The Super-Weapon" by Siegel, Swan & Kaye;
    "Superboy's First Public Appearance" by Siegel & Plastino; and
    "The Orphans of Space" by Siegel and Plastino

    from Superman #144 (GCBD link)



    Found in Showcase Presents: Superman vol. 2

    Synopsis:

    In "The Super-Weapon," Luthor tells his soon-to-be-released cellmate his plans for a ... well, a super-weapon. He wants to be sprung from jail. Luthor's associate charges it up with Superman's powers (pretending to be a philanthropic newscaster) and then uses it for simple heists, leaving Luthor to rot. When Superman tries to arrest the gang, they turn the weapon on him--tossing him INTO the sun! (Wow!) Superman, flying back, thinks, "Wh--what hit me? I've always thought nothing but kryptonite could harm me!" That's because you've never been hit by fully-powered Kryptonian strength before! The pattern repeats itself for a few days until Superman figures out what's going on and finds a way to weaken the gun, grab the criminals, and hand them over to the police.

    In "Superboy's First Public Appearance," Superboy meets the mayor, the governor, and the president in short order, stopping a few crimes and participating in war games. Lana Lang looks at Clark's yearbook, which names him the "boy most likely to become famous," and she says, "Ha, ha! Look what it predicted for you! I'm afraid you turned out to be just another one of thousands of reporters, Clark! Too bad! I really thought you'd become someone big!" Clark looks knowingly at the reader.

    Finally, "The Orphans of Space" shows Superman, Supergirl, and Krypto in the Fortress of Solitude, trying to get a new machine from space to work. Suddenly, it explodes--taking planet earth with it! Even worse, the planetary fragments of former earth become radioactive pieces of earthite, as deadly to the three Kryptonians as kryptonite ever was. The three are put on trial by an intergalactic court, depowered, and put on a dangerous planet filled with prehistoric life. A creature kills Supergirl and Krypto ... and for this one alone, I'll use the spoiler.

    Plot Spoiler: The three wake up, back in the Fortress. It turns out that all three had been affected by red kryptonite dust, and had all had the same dream. Superman is thrilled to be alive ... and he decides he'd better test that new machine in outer space somewhere.

    Artwork: Nice cover. In Swan's story, he shows his technical proficiency and his excellent control of facial expressions, but there isn't as much "camera movement" as we're used to, and his poses lack the kind of drama, verve, and action referred to in, for example, How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way. They're inappropriately flat for the amount of strength and power getting tossed around. I'm loving Kaye's inking.

    Plastino's two tales were unremarkable except for the occasional badly-drawn face (especially on Superman), sometimes even bad enough to throw me out of the otherwise-compelling third story. Also, his inks on faces almost look like he's using a thicker pen than when he's inking anything else. I've never noticed this effect before, and I can't say I like it.

    Observations: In "The Super-Weapon," Superman does not say, I've always thought nothing but kryptonite or magic could harm me!" The weakness has yet to be invented. Or discovered, if you wish.

    Why didn't Luthor ever use this stunningly effective weapon again?

    Just as he did in Bizarro's first appearance, Luthor originated a scheme and then disappeared. When will he really have it out with Superman? (And when does he first don those purple togs with the crossed suspenders?)

    If the weapon is that strong, why did it not so much as break a rib or blacken an eye? Did the CCA really prohibit heroes getting injured?

    For "Superboy's First Public Appearance," not much happens.

    Lana really is a little witch, isn't she? (He should marry Lori!)

    I haven't been paying attention before this, but this is one of the first times I've seen the Clark/Superman-looks-knowingly-at-the-reader-in-the-final-panel meme. All he's missing is the wink.

    "The Orphans of Space" is horrific near the middle. I mean, it's actually scary. At one point, though, about two-thirds through, it kind of jumps the shark, and then we have our big reveal, and it's all over.

    So, earth just exploded. Earlier this issue, a weapon pushed Superman into the sun. You gotta say this for Siegel: he thinks big.

    The intergalactic trial followed by de-powering reminds me of Claremont & Byrne's original plans for Jean Grey before Shooter became involved.

    Overall: "The Super-Weapon" = Solid A for sheer gusto.
    "Superboy's First Public Appearance" = D for being hard to get through. Every time I open it to try to read it, I start skimming. I guess I can see why someone else might like it, but it sure didn't work for me.
    "The Orphans of Space" = B+, with penalties for artwork and shark-jumping.
    Last edited by Polar Bear; 02-12-2013 at 03:25 PM.
    Anyway, it is cool for you to acquire acrimony of crumbling time on blast this website.
    --best spam ever

  9. #99
    Senior Member JKCarrier's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,724

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Polar Bear View Post
    And when does he first don those purple togs with the crossed suspenders?
    Not till the 1970s. I suspect it was done to make him more merchandizable.
    -JKC-
    Glorianna - Barbarian adventure! New page every Friday!

  10. #100
    Senior Member Polar Bear's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    College Park, MD
    Posts
    1,240

    Default May 1961

    "The Night of March 31st" by Seigel, Swan & Moldoff (8 pgs.)

    from Superman #145 (GCDB link)



    Found in The Greatest Superman Stories Ever Told

    Synopsis: On the night of March 31, Superman goes to sleep. When he awakens, everything is topsy-turvy: Perry is a Bizarro (who speaks perfect English); Lori Lemaris has legs; Lois Lane is romantically involved with Mr. Mxyzptlk; Supergirl has gone public; Krypto loses his super-powers despite Streaky (the occasional super-cat) keeping his; red kryptonite has no effect on him; and Luthor, Brainiac, and Bizarro save Supes from green kryptonite and sing him "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow." Utter lunacy. They know his secret identity, too--they read it in a Superman comic book!

    This is too much for the Man of Steel, who promptly faints. Right on top of the city of Kandor. Crash!

    Can you figure it out?

    Plot Spoiler: What's the morning after March 31st? April 1st! Happy April Fool's Day!

    Artwork: Curt Swan does his best George Perez imitation, with great details stuffed into almost every panel, from the texturing on Brainiac's face to the leaning tower of Pisa in the background, from the time on the clock to the mysteriously disappearing-and-reappearing glasses Superman wears. Except when he doesn't. Fun! He has a good eye for the comedic, and he's varying the camera distance more than he did in the past story of his I reviewed.

    Observations: Nutty.

    This is Streaky's first appearance outside of the Supergirl stories in Action.

    Fascinating that Brainiac and Luthor are now two of his "worst enemies," when the former has really only appeared twice and the latter has been more noted for his absence than his presence. And Bizarro is almost on friendly terms with him, as far as I can tell.

    My kids read this story over and over, finding more and more things wrong with the story--sometimes it will be something in the art, like Superman not wearing a cape. Sometimes it will be an event, like Mxyzptlk willingly saying his name backwards. Occasionally, it's a problem with the interaction of text and art, with the narrator saying it's noon when the clock reads 8:40. But it definitely rewards re-readings.

    Overall: A well deserved A+. A story like this is worth buying the whole comic for.
    Last edited by Polar Bear; 02-13-2013 at 03:13 AM.
    Anyway, it is cool for you to acquire acrimony of crumbling time on blast this website.
    --best spam ever

  11. #101
    Gotham Guardian Captain Jim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 1998
    Location
    northeastern Ohio
    Posts
    14,241

    Default

    Both of these last issues (144 & 145) demonstrate (as have others) that DC really had some great covers during this period--usually by Curt Swan. I remember picking up 145 as a kid because I was so taken by the cover.

    As far as "The Night of March 31st" is concerned, my recollection is that following the reveal at the end of the story, in the actual issue there was an announcement of a contest to see who could come up with the correct number of errors in the story. I remember because I entered. But I can't remember if there was anything about the contest in the reprint or not.
    Jim Zimmerman
    Co-moderator, CBR Batman Forum

  12. #102
    Ex-Cheeks Reptisaurus!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Iowa City I-AAAAAAAAAAAA!
    Posts
    5,473

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Polar Bear View Post
    Except it'll be more, because I've decided to include DC Comics Presents after all, and I have a few annuals, mini-series, and treasury editions to include...
    Yay! To both - I think I own all the stories from the treasuries in some format.
    MarkAndrew at Comics Should Be Good
    All my life, my Great Dream has been to grow a triangular head - Roy Thomas

  13. #103
    Senior Member Polar Bear's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    College Park, MD
    Posts
    1,240

    Default June 1961

    "The Conquest of Superman" by Finger, Swan & John Forte
    "The Battle of the Super-Pets" by Siegel & Mooney

    from Action Comics #277 (GCDB link)



    Found in the actual comic book! Yes, I actually own this issue!

    This is the earliest issue of any comic featuring Superman that I personally own. It's in pretty horrible shape, but it's complete! Reading a comic book is quite different than reading the reprint. In this story, besides the two above-listed stories, we also have:
    1) Several ads, including an ad for the Cole Bros. Circus (the one our family visits every third year) and a half-page house ad for Tales of the Bizarro World in Adventure Comics;
    2) A "Little Pete" one-page funny;
    3) A two-page "Metropolis Mailbox" with answers to every single letter (!);
    4) A list of all the TV stations that carry the Superman TV show; and
    5) A one-page PSA called "Parents Have Rights, Too!" that would never, ever, ever be published today.

    And, stunningly, the printing really isn't that bad! I can see the small lines John Forte used to embellish Swan's pencils. I'll have to compare a reprint to an original comic when I get to an issue where I have both. Of course, the pages aren't exactly white...

    Synopsis: In "The Conquest of Superman," we make up for Luthor's relative absence (did he hear me complaining in my last review?) with a story that focuses on him entirely! In Superman's absence, the government comes to Luthor for help with a crisis. Luthor solves the crisis with an anti-gravity ray he constructs on the spot, but then uses the ray to escape. He then gives an associate a tour of his lair, which echoes the Fortress of Solitude in several particulars. Some of the more interesting spots include the hall of villains, which includes Atilla the Hun, Genghis Khan, Captain Kidd, and Al Capone; a wall of calendars showing how much time Luthor has spent in jail; and an extradimensional jungle he keeps in a bottle. His plans to take the gold from Fort Knox are astoundingly successful--certainly the guards are no match for him, and when Superman arrives, Luthor keeps him at bay with a weapon that tosses floating kryptonite spheres into the air, surrounding the Man of Steel in all directions. He escapes with all the gold! But when Luthor learns that Superman was in outer space, and that all he defeated was one of Superman's robots, he has a major freak-out, wrecking his own statue and returning the gold to Fort Knox! The story ends with Luthor and (the real) Superman in a split panel, each thinking about the next time he will encounter the other one.

    In "Battle," Streaky--who, as two panels' exposition conveniently tells us, gets his super-powers from a radioactive marble wrapped in a ball of twine--gets jealous of Krypto, and Supergirl arranges several contests between the two, not without some cheating, all ending in a split decision. However, as they compete on a nearby planetoid, odd things keep happening, like a bone getting up and walking away, or Streaky becoming elephantine in size. Finally, Supergirl and the two animals discover that the planetoid is headquarters to a group of practical jokers, Mr. Mxyzptzk among them. She leads the animals home on relatively friendly terms--just in time to rendezvous with Beppo, the Super-Monkey, of whom the other two animals immediately develop a jealous streak. In the words just under the last panel, we're promised a sequel soon!

    Plot Spoiler: Nothing to see here, move along...

    Artwork: Swan's expressiveness is wonderful, though he had a bit of trouble in the one panel where he drew Luthor's face very close up, and he has very small problems with hands (if I'm seeing right). Body language is key, here. The layouts are ... well, super, especially the final two panels with Superman and Luthor thinking identical thoughts. These two panels combined into the size of one normal (1/6 page) panel, and the line separating them was diagonal, very effectively conveying the theme of Luthor and Superman's similarities.

    Mooney's artwork is cartoony for Streaky and realistic for everything else. This proves distracting when it comes to Supergirl. Is it just me, or is that a reeeally short skirt for 1961? Mooney does seem to enjoy drawing her, and that's about all I think I'll say about that.

    Observations: "Conquest" is probably the earliest villain-centric super-hero comics story I've read.

    -I love the complexity (for 1961) they gave Luthor, here--he doesn't want money; he wants to beat Superman!

    -I also love how they thematically treated Superman and Luthor as opposite sides of a coin, in some ways.

    -The ending was a bit of a deus ex machina, but hey, welcome to Weisinger's Superman.

    -"Battle" was cute, but kind of episodic.

    Overall: "Conquest": Solid A.
    "Battle": Solid B.

    Klenda says: "Conquest": Funny and ironic. Luthor did not want the gold; he just wanted to beat Superman. It makes you wonder: What would he have done with the rest of his life if he had beaten Superman? A-.
    "Battle": The ending was original, though rather anti-climactic. It was as thought it was coming up to an avalanche, when really it was just one rock. I'm glad that they didn't make one win over the issue, since some would like Streaky better and some Krypto--plus, if one won and one lost, it would tend to demoralize the losing hero. I'd say it's a C+ ... not the best comic story I've ever read, but not the worst.

    Zorg says: "Conquest": Yellow kryptonite later will be called gold kryptonite. I think Lex Luthor has been in jail 100 times and broken out of jail 105 times. B+.
    "Battle": I did not know that Streaky's powers came and went! Solid A.
    Last edited by Polar Bear; 02-14-2013 at 03:06 PM.
    Anyway, it is cool for you to acquire acrimony of crumbling time on blast this website.
    --best spam ever

  14. #104
    Senior Member Polar Bear's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    College Park, MD
    Posts
    1,240

    Default July 1961

    "The Story of Superman's Life" by Binder & Plastino (13 pgs)

    from Superman #146 (GCDB link)



    Found in Superman in the Sixties

    Synopsis: A retelling to Superman's biography, including daily life on Krypton, Jor-El and Lara's dilemma and solution, the Kents' discovery and adoption of him, the revelations of his super-powers, Ma weaving his costume (yes, WEAVING it), Pa leaving the farm and opening a store, Pa helping him learn to fly, Lana, his first Superboy robot, the arrival of Krypto, his first exposure to kryptonite, the death of Ma and Pa Kent, his departure from Smallville, his arrival at Metropolis, and the U.N.'s presentation to him of honorary citizenship of all member nations.

    Plot Spoiler: Nothing to see here, move along...

    Artwork: Aside from an unusually realistic Superman face on the splash page, we have Plastino's typical slightly-cartoony style here, which suits the lightness of the story. Most pages are based on a six-panel grid, pleasingly varied, though the "camera" distance is somewhat static. A couple of pages have a more experimental layout--a single caption connecting either two or three panels at the top, with angled gutters between the panels instead of straight vertical ones. It's a device that works well, not drawing attention to itself yet joining the thematically-related panels almost seamlessly.

    The panel where the whole town lines up on a field and forms the words "FAREWELL SUPERBOY WE'LL NEVER FORGET YOU" as he flies away has become iconic, perhaps the most famous panel he's ever drawn.

    Observations: Ma weaved it? Really? I'm deeply impressed with Ma's textile skills.

    Gotta love Jor-El's calendar in the background, with a particular day circled and marked "Day of Doom."

    I enjoyed the pages where Ma, Pa, and Clark discover Clark's powers and find ways to deal with mundane, day-to-day problems like Clark's rough play wearing out his clothes too quickly. They really rise to the occasion of being super-parents in every way.

    The joy caused by Krypto's arrival is contagious--now, for the first time in his life, Kal has someone to play with full-out! This implies a loneliness that future iterations of the legend would expand upon.

    Overall: I started out this review not very impressed, but the more I've written, the more I like it. This retrospective style tends to bring out the best in Binder. I think we'll settle for a B+.

    Klenda says: A+! This has got to be my favorite Superman comic ever! This may appeal to those who were only recently exposed to the concept of Superman and is indispensable for those already hooked!

    Zorg says: C-. Superman's origin. No more, no less.
    Anyway, it is cool for you to acquire acrimony of crumbling time on blast this website.
    --best spam ever

  15. #105

    Default

    I'm not usually one to care much for condition, but Superman #146 is a book I am hoping to get in relatively high grade. The reason is that this cover is absolutely amazing if you can find a copy with bright colors. The color work on this cover is just second to none for me, with the yellow background and the great mix of blue and red.

    Check out this high grade copy with bright colors. So beautiful:

    At last, Boy Comics finally gets its own website!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •