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  1. #46
    Marked for Redemption David Walton's Avatar
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    11) Paul Jenkins. Someone said 'a breath of fresh air' and that's exactly right. He arrived on the scene in the midst of Clone Saga and post-reboot malaise, injecting Peter's world with strong character based work. Fusion and Revenge of the Green Goblin are the stand outs for me, with the caveat that I don't see Peter yukking it up with Norman any more than Batman would with the Joker. His later work never reached the same heights and felt middle-of-the-road.

    10) JMS. Not a big fan of the lack of classic villains, but he had possibly the best take on Peter Parker ever, as well as the marriage. The Spider-totem angle was interesting at first but it inevitably goes off the rails later. Around Civil War the book feels more like "Tony Stark is an ass" than The Amazing Spider-Man. Suffers by comparison to what Peter David was able to accomplish with CW and BiB.

    9) Bill Mantlo. Not sure whether his reputation suffers or benefits from the fact that he did his best work when Stern was on ASM! The Ock/Owl Gang War is a PPTSSM height that is only exceeded by JMD's run.

    8) Marv Wolfman. The Burglar Saga is such a brilliant story that brings Pete full circle from AF 15.


    7) David Michelinie. More for the first half of his run than the second. His work with McFarlane and Larsen is FUN. The marriage, the monsters, the book tour. Seriously, you can tell these guys were having a blast. We got Hobby vs. Green Goblin! The greatest new villain since the Stern era showing up at May's doorstep and asking if Peter can come out and play! The best take on the Sinister Six...ever! MJ taking on possessed jewelry and stalkers! Unfortunately, the editorially mandated 'return of Peter's parents' killed the momentum...but not really his fault.

    6) Tom DeFalco. Tom had the unenviable task of following up Stern, but he rose to the challenge in what is still one of the best ASM runs ever. Gang War further explores the differences between Peter Parker and Matt Murdock in a compelling way. DeFalco also blew my mind with the revelation that MJ knew Peter's secret (talk about one hell of a cliffhanger at the time!) and gave us her backstory. All this said, my personal favorite DeFalco story is the one-shot about the football player throwing games for the Rose! And...I like the Puma.
    Last edited by David Walton; 01-08-2013 at 07:26 AM.
    "I came to the conclusion that the optimist thought everything good except the pessimist, and the pessimist thought everything bad, except himself." -- G.K. Chesterton

  2. #47
    Marked for Redemption David Walton's Avatar
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    5) Gerry Conway. Yeah, he killed Gwen Stacy, but he didn't stop there. With Harry taking up his father's legacy and the original Clone Saga, he showed us that there were really no limits as to just how crazy Spider-Man's life could get. He also solidified MJ's eventual status as 'the one.' Conway's second run on Spidey in the 80s (WOS and PPTSSM) is criminally underrated, featuring a very poignant wrap-up of Peter's feelings about Gwen in PPTSSM 149 and a killer soap opera arc in the form of Robbie's undisclosed past with Tombstone. Conway also gave us new insight into JJJ's past.

    4) Peter David. Taken as a whole, Peter David's Sin-Eater saga personifies what made his 80s Spider-Man work stand out. Yes, Jean DeWolff's death was shocking, but that's not the full story. PAD's early body of work deals with the 80s crime epidemic and Peter's frequent after-the-fact realization that some problems can't be punched away. More than any other writer up to this point, David shows us that Peter is prone to react emotionally, and equally prone to regret it later. That's never more clear than when Peter realizes the severity of Stan Carter's mental illness and the physical toll his beating took. But David also gave us perhaps the most comedic take on the Parker luck with "The Commuter Cometh!" one-shot. In the 90s, David re-invented Spider-Man for a new age, giving us a character who's much more than Peter Parker 2.0. He also had a fun, dark and weird sci-fi take on Spidey in FNSM. Not everyone's cup of tea, but I thought it was brilliant.

    3) Stan Lee. Amazing Fantasy 15 isn't just the best superhero origin ever: it's something that stands toe to toe with literary 'twists' along the lines of O. Henry and the The Twilight Zone. Lee would go on to create the template for all things fantastical and grounded, creating a world where supervillains and street criminals alike plagued Spider-Man. He also created the best supporting character in the form of J. Jonah Jameson.

    2) Roger Stern. It's amazing how 'low-key' Stern's run is by comparison to what follows: he never married or killed off a major character, but then, he didn't need to. Stern perfected 'the Parker luck' formula, crafted the most intriguing mystery the book had ever seen, and mixed things up with villains like the Juggernaut and Mr. Hyde. If that wasn't enough, he also wrote the best Spider-Man short story ever: "The Kid Who Collects Spider-Man."

    1) J M DeMatteis. Like Shakespeare, Kraven's Last Hunt broke down the distinction between 'high' and 'low' art. It works as a serial adventure and as a novel, in the comic bin and on the shelf beside Dostoevsky. Where else could you find a cannibalistic man-rat plucked straight from a ten year old's nightmares and character development on the level of Crime and Punishment? Kraven's character arc gets more attention, but there's no shortage of love for Peter Parker here. If you never read another Spider-Man story, you'd still get everything you'd ever need to know about him here: Peter is willing to face his darkest fears in the form of Vermin because he has a responsibility. Even better, it's one of those rare gems that could easily function as the 'final' Spider-Man story. He'd make the top spot for KLH alone, but he followed up the greatest Spider-Man 'novel' with the best run. His first Spectacular Spider-Man arc successfuly weaves the 'adventure of the month' format with the rising tension between Harry and Peter. In typical JMD fashion, he pushes the limits and brings their conflict to a tragic, beautiful and satisfying conclusion: Harry is the villain and the hero of his own story. JMD would also write the best Spider-Man miniseries with The Lost Years, the strongest case for Ben Reilly. You've also got ASM 400, "The Gift," which might be the most beautiful take on a death in Spider-Man's history. JMD doesn't get the distinction for the best short story (that goes to Stern's "The Kid Who Collects Spider-Man"), but he is the most consistent, with several Ben Reilly backups and the latest "Spider-Dreams." So in short: Best, Best, Best, Most Consistent! JMD isn't just on my Top Five: he might just be my Top Five!
    "I came to the conclusion that the optimist thought everything good except the pessimist, and the pessimist thought everything bad, except himself." -- G.K. Chesterton

  3. #48
    Senior Member RyanParkerMan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    Slott's #5 on my list and JMS is #9, so I do think Slott is better. A big reason is that I think his best work (Matters of Life & Death, ) is better than JMS's work.
    Coming Home would be in my Top 50, but there are two things I hold against it. The fight with Morlun is derivative of the classic Juggernaut fight. And there's the absurd coincidence of Peter Parker going to Midtown High on the same day as a school shooting, an even that is not mentioned again.

    As for Millar, I thought twelve issues is ultimately enough to determine that someone can be included in a list of top writers. Steve Englehart earned his spot on the top Batman writers with less, as did Alan Moore with Superman.

    Interesting question on why they're tied. I think that's math more than anything else. People are likely to pick them but not in the top five, so they'll cluster together with Jenkins, who is in the same position.

    I will note that I don't care for the points system, although it's been done before with some professional organizations. It doesn't seem to me that the tenth best writer is worth nine times less than the second best. I'm not sure how to compensate for that, though. Maybe by awarding every writer additional points for the number of lists they appear in.
    "Absurd coincidence"...? It's a Spider-Man comic. I think that scene plays very well to Peter PArker and Spider-Man. It plays to the mythos. When Peter says "Kids shouldn't have to be afraid in school"... And Romita Jr has the close up of his face. He's angry but there's also sadness in his face. He's Peter Parker. He knows how it feels to be afraid in school. He knows what it feels like to get picked on and beat up. He won't have it. That's why JMS is in my top 5. He gets ASM.
    Kevin Nichols is jealous of my friendship with Oldschool.

  4. #49
    Senior Member RyanParkerMan's Avatar
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    Great list David Walton. If I could do my list again, I'd definitly put David Michelinie in. I loved his Spider-Man. He was one of the firt writers I ever read. Also, good case for Defalco. Gang War is total street level Spidey and I do remember reading the one shot of the football player and the rose. Spider-Girl is also a real gem and further explores Peter Parker as a character. There's no giving up for Peter. He gets his leg blown off and he uses his backround in science to become a forensic scientist for the police. And even though he's a criple, he'd suit up because there is no greater responisblitilty than his own family.
    Kevin Nichols is jealous of my friendship with Oldschool.

  5. #50
    Marked for Redemption David Walton's Avatar
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    Absurd is a stretch when we're talking about a guy whose arch enemy turned out to be his father's best friend.
    "I came to the conclusion that the optimist thought everything good except the pessimist, and the pessimist thought everything bad, except himself." -- G.K. Chesterton

  6. #51
    Marked for Redemption David Walton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RyanParkerMan View Post
    Great list David Walton. If I could do my list again, I'd definitly put David Michelinie in. I loved his Spider-Man. He was one of the firt writers I ever read. Also, good case for Defalco. Gang War is total street level Spidey and I do remember reading the one shot of the football player and the rose. Spider-Girl is also a real gem and further explores Peter Parker as a character. There's no giving up for Peter. He gets his leg blown off and he uses his backround in science to become a forensic scientist for the police. And even though he's a criple, he'd suit up because there is no greater responisblitilty than his own family.
    Thanks, Ryan! I really should have mentioned Spider-Girl. I see it as the perfect 'ending' to Peter's story...in other words, it doesn't really end, he just has to juggle power and responsibility in a new way. It's fun to see him on the other end of what he put Aunt May through (assuming she knew, or just in the general sense that she worried about him). In hindsight, maybe I should have ranked DeFalco higher!
    "I came to the conclusion that the optimist thought everything good except the pessimist, and the pessimist thought everything bad, except himself." -- G.K. Chesterton

  7. #52
    Senior Member RyanParkerMan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Walton View Post
    Thanks, Ryan! I really should have mentioned Spider-Girl. I see it as the perfect 'ending' to Peter's story...in other words, it doesn't really end, he just has to juggle power and responsibility in a new way. It's fun to see him on the other end of what he put Aunt May through (assuming she knew, or just in the general sense that she worried about him). In hindsight, maybe I should have ranked DeFalco higher!
    I think you ranked him perfectly.
    Kevin Nichols is jealous of my friendship with Oldschool.

  8. #53
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    As I've mentioned in another thread, the order keeps changing, but here is my top eleven as of today:

    1. Stan Lee
    with a little help from Steve Ditko and Johnny Romita, but then he's not the only writer who had a synergy with their artist.
    2. Gerry Conway
    It's not easy having to follow the Man himself, but Gerry Conway also was one of the youngest writers to be handed the crucial Spider-writing assignment. Besides ASM #121-122 I'd mention the original Clone Saga, Spidey first meeting a crimefighter with a totally different philosophy (the Punisher), the nascent Peter/MJ romance. Conway did not even let editorial mandates slow him down (Spider-Mobile, the apparent return of Gwen). In his later run I fondly recall "Parallel Lives" and the Tombstone storyline - perhaps the best story in which Robbie takes and holds centre-stage.
    3. J. Marc DeMatteis
    Don't need to explain this, do I?
    4. Brian Michael Bendis
    Always delivered on Ultimate
    5. Tom DeFalco
    Another great and long runner (I'm including Spider-Girl etc., as Spidey is an essential part of that)
    6. J. Michael Straczynski
    Brought me back to Spider-Man even though I disliked Aunt May being returned from the dead and was very sceptical about the Spider-Totem concept. Fell off somewhat in the later part of his run.
    7. Peter A. David
    Can do funny and serious equally well.
    8. Roger Stern
    Might have ranked higher if not for his IMO too self-indulgent "Hobgoblin Lives!"
    9. Chris Claremont
    My favourite among the shorter-tenured Spider-writers for his great MTU stories.
    10. Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa
    Despite JMS on ASM and PAD on FNSM, RAS made SSM my favourite Spider-title between Civil War and OMD.
    11. Louise Simonson
    Did a few fun stories in MTU, WOSM and one of my favourite annuals, ASM Annual #19 (with the eye-catching "This is a job for MJ" cover).

    Louise Simonson edged out Kaare Andrews, Dan Jurgens, Bill Mantlo, and David Michelinie.

  9. #54

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    Nice list, David. I like that you put JMD first. He is an awesome writer, and the case for him is compelling. Makes me want to reconsider his position on my list and go back and read some more JMD stories. Damned if I can't find a TPB of KLH anywhere.
    Perfect humility dispenses with modesty.

  10. #55
    Senior Member Xenon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JGC View Post
    Xenon, one factor that I'm sure is coming into play here is the starting point for which people starting reading Spider-Man. The "nostalgia" factor definitely comes into play. At least for me, as a product of the 80's - writers like Stern, DeMatteis, DeFalco, David, Mantlo will rate high because of my fond memories as a kid collecting comics. That's not to say writers like JMS or Slott are bad, I'm just at a different stage in my life where the 'impressionable youth' factor has worn off.

    That being said, Bendis and Jenkins cracked my top ten and they're both Y2K writers that really got me back into comics after the cesspool that was the late 90's.
    I'm sure there's a lot of truth to that. For me, I didn't read comics as a child. I didn't have access to a shop, and I was always a stickler for starting from the beginning. Since when i did start reading just under two years ago that's exactly what I did, it's not something I can relate to in this arena. But, Nostalgia is a powerful force. That's for sure.

    Quote Originally Posted by Leocomix View Post
    Making a point, I guess.

    Sad that Waid and McKeever were omitted from the original list. They're pretty much forgotten.
    Waid was a silly oversight in the BND writers. McKeever I wouldn't have thought to put on because his big work was Spider-Man Loves Mary-Jane,

    Quote Originally Posted by oldschool View Post
    That definitely influenced my voting as well; Conway was on ASM when I first started reading the title and Mantlo was on SSM around or close to that time as well. Regarding the Slott/JMS oddity that Xenon mentioned, my only guess is this: while, on the surface, they appear to have very different approaches to the character and folks that you meet who are huge JMS fans often don't like Slott and vice-versa, that really isn't true. My point is that, for many who loved JMS' run and don't like Slott's, the reason could be the dissolution of the marriage. Not saying that is the only factor but, for quite a few folks that I know, it is. Now.....it seems to be that the poll has the 2 writers in a dead heat which supports the notion that fans of either writer (perhaps grudgingly) admit that the other does some good work.....even if they don't support it or claim they don't read it. Just a guess. Me? I read all of JMS' work (and every other issue of Spidey) and loved his first year but grew weary of his mystical bent and lack of supporting characters/classic villains so I greatly prefer Slott but put JMS on my list (beneath Slott) because his impact and talent is undeniable; while I prefer Peter single, the breakup of the marriage was not a huge factor in why I prefer Slott's stories. It could be that other voters feel the same way or vice-versa (they may have reacted more to the marriage ending and never gave Slott's stories, particularly the recent ones, a fair shake). Again, just one man's guess.
    The continuity snarl that is current continuity I think has some impact, but not as much as you'd think. I liked BND a lot. Yeah, there were some irritating moments, but for the most part, the marriage is not and was not a huge part of the book, so most of the tale is unaffected. And even in areas where its a factor, how its handled goes a long way. I still love Nora and would have vastly preferred her as the girlfriend to Carlie "YOU LOVE HER CAUSE WE SAY SO" Cooper. Mr. Slott's writing just has a lot of problems for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    Slott's #5 on my list and JMS is #9, so I do think Slott is better. A big reason is that I think his best work (Matters of Life & Death, ) is better than JMS's work.
    Coming Home would be in my Top 50, but there are two things I hold against it. The fight with Morlun is derivative of the classic Juggernaut fight. And there's the absurd coincidence of Peter Parker going to Midtown High on the same day as a school shooting, an even that is not mentioned again.

    As for Millar, I thought twelve issues is ultimately enough to determine that someone can be included in a list of top writers. Steve Englehart earned his spot on the top Batman writers with less, as did Alan Moore with Superman.

    Interesting question on why they're tied. I think that's math more than anything else. People are likely to pick them but not in the top five, so they'll cluster together with Jenkins, who is in the same position.

    I will note that I don't care for the points system, although it's been done before with some professional organizations. It doesn't seem to me that the tenth best writer is worth nine times less than the second best. I'm not sure how to compensate for that, though. Maybe by awarding every writer additional points for the number of lists they appear in.
    It's an imperfect system, for sure, but I'm not sure there's a better one. Number of lists is somethign that seems to basically sort itself out. Stan hasn't missed a list, Stern and DeMatteis 1, Conway 2, and it goes up from there. I can't expalin it to you, but at least in the top eleven, you don't really have situations where someone who's missing in a bunch of lists is beating out a bunch of people who are on more lists.

    And besides, as a composite list, no one will ever be completely happy with it. Just the nature of the beast. It's kinda fun though.

    Quote Originally Posted by RyanParkerMan View Post
    Great list David Walton. If I could do my list again, I'd definitly put David Michelinie in. I loved his Spider-Man. He was one of the firt writers I ever read. Also, good case for Defalco. Gang War is total street level Spidey and I do remember reading the one shot of the football player and the rose. Spider-Girl is also a real gem and further explores Peter Parker as a character. There's no giving up for Peter. He gets his leg blown off and he uses his backround in science to become a forensic scientist for the police. And even though he's a criple, he'd suit up because there is no greater responisblitilty than his own family.
    Technically, you could do it again. I'm keeping track of everything in an excel spreadsheet, which means I could redo one person's votes in about the same amount of time as it took me to do it in the first place. I mean, if people kept redoing them over and over I'd get annoyed, but a revision here and there doesn't bother me.

    And now since we got a bunch of new votes, some updated standings.

    Current Composite Standings (Number in Parenthesis is number of points) [Number in Brackets is number of First Place votes]

    1) Stan Lee (173 points) [12]
    2) J.M. DeMatteis (139 points) [3]
    3) Roger Stern (114 points) [1]
    4) Gerry Conway (108 points)
    5) J. Michael Straczynski (77 points) [1]
    6) Brian Michael Bendis (75 points)
    7) Peter David (70 points)
    8) Dan Slott (58 points)
    9) Tom DeFalco (53 points)
    10) Paul Jenkins (45.5 points)
    11) Chris Claremont (36 points)

    There are a total of 30 writers who have received votes. Quite a shake up in such a short period, eh?
    When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.-C.S.Lewis

  11. #56
    Marked for Redemption David Walton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Taylor View Post
    Nice list, David. I like that you put JMD first. He is an awesome writer, and the case for him is compelling. Makes me want to reconsider his position on my list and go back and read some more JMD stories.
    That's what the edit function is for!

    Damned if I can't find a TPB of KLH anywhere.
    That's a shame! Is it out of print now?

    BTW, I think Stan's position on the list is more out of obligation than anything. I mean, I LOVE Stan, but I can't say I think his work was better than JMD or Stern's.

    C'mon people--you know you want to switch your #1 vote to JMD!
    Last edited by David Walton; 01-08-2013 at 11:10 AM.
    "I came to the conclusion that the optimist thought everything good except the pessimist, and the pessimist thought everything bad, except himself." -- G.K. Chesterton

  12. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Walton View Post
    BTW, I think Stan's position on the list is more out of obligation than anything. I mean, I LOVE Stan, but I can't say I think his work was better than JMD or Stern's.

    C'mon people--you know you want to switch your #1 vote to JMD!
    To explain why DeMatteis and Stern did not even make the top 2 on my list, here are some of the factors on my mind:

    Stan Lee is the giant on whose shoulders the other writers of Spider-Man stand. He created the basic set-up, (co-)created most of the central and most iconic members of the cast and their characterization. He wrote an origin for Spider-Man that stood the test of time, that you can still put forward as simply the best superhero origin ever. If you think of your favourite Spider-Man related quotes or catchphrases, they most likely originated with him.

    Stan was the trailblazer, he broke the ground for the others. It was in no small measure due to his writing (in general and in particular on Spider-Man) in the 1960s that superhero comic writing such as that of Stern and DeMatteis in the 1980s became possible. Yes, some of it may sound a bit corny by today's standards, but at the time it was first printed it was miles ahead of everybody else. For its time, Spider-Man was an incredibly innovative feature, it transformed the superhero genre. The only other Spider-Man writer of whom you can say that is Gerry Conway, whose stories (in particular the death of Gwen Stacey and the introduction of the Punisher) ushered in the Bronze Age of comics and may even be considered the grandfather of the Dark Age. And that probably was the last time you could say that Spider-Man was at the cutting edge of superhero writing. After that, Spider-Man followed trends more than it set them (the only trend "set" by Spider-Man in later years probably was the importance of Spider-Man #1 for the whole variant cover debacle). At this moment Peter Parker is replaced by a very different person as Spider-Man in the mainstream - something that has already been done with Batman and Superman, and it is likely that it won't last as long as it has been done with alternate-universe Spider-Men (2099, Ultimate).

    Stan Lee was not afraid of change and had a knack for making it work. When he had Peter graduate from High School and begin college, he got a mostly new supporting cast and the new characters (Gwen and George Stacey, MJ, Harry, Joe and Randy Robertson) were good enough to make readers not miss those who were written out (Liz, Flash Thompson for a time) or relegated to the background (Betty, Ned). Later it was Stan's work on the newspaper strip that led to the marriage of Peter and MJ in the mainstream comicbook version. In contrast, a lot of the other Spider-Man writers appear to be afraid of change, and that certainly seems to be the case with Roger Stern, who wrote a technically brilliant Stan Lee pastiche for the 1980s (I see the Hobgoblin Saga as "(Original) Green Goblin Saga - the extended cut") and improved a number of characters' characterization (most notably Aunt May's and the Vulture's), but who like a Silver Age DC writer wanted the important things to remain the same (e. g. he had Peter give up his academic career so he could stay a freelance photographer for the "Daily Bugle" like he had been since high school).

    Also, as you've seen from my list, I do give points for endurance, and nobody has been writing Spider-Man for as long as the Man!
    Last edited by Menshevik; 01-09-2013 at 02:58 AM.

  13. #58
    Elder Member whiteshark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    I'm a bit surprised to see Conway, Michelinie and Mantlo so high on the list. What do you like about their work (aside from The Night Gwen Stacy Died) so much?
    Conway stories ranked from Good to great.Both runs in the 70s and 90s were consistent.Besides making many of the best Spider-Man stories as The Night Gwen Stacy Dies,Original Clone Saga with the debut of Punisher,he also did great work with classic villains as Mysterio.
    And he kept the momentum of great stories in Amazing Spider-Man after Stan Lee.And thast no small feat.

    Michelinie stories revitalized the Sinister Six,had the first apearence of Venom,and it had a really fun tone in the stories that are not tarnished by some weaker stories by Michelinie as the Robotic Parents of Peter Parker storyline.Michelinie was another writer that due consistent good stories in his almost 100 run stories in ASM got my vote.

    Mantlo stories are quite under rated,and yet he had a very good run of Spider-Man stories in the 80s.As was the Doctor Octopus vs Owl story arc.
    Plus the best stories between Spider-Man and Black Cat were writen by him.
    New characters as the villain Carrion and allies as Cloak & Dagger were solid additions to the Spider-Man stories.
    And the story arcs in Marvel Team Up were cool as well.
    Pull List:New Avengers,Thor,Superior Spider-Man,Mighty Avengers,Swamp Thing,Daredevil,Uncanny Avengers,Superior Foes of Spider-Man.

  14. #59
    Junior Member goblin9's Avatar
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    From the least favorite to the favorite:

    11. Brian Michael Bendis
    10. Zeb Wells
    9. Gerry Conway
    8. Joe Kelly
    7. Roy Thomas
    6. Roger Stern
    5. J.M. DeMatteis
    4. Peter David
    3. Paul Jenkins
    2. Stan Lee
    1. Dan Slott

  15. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by JGC View Post
    Xenon, one factor that I'm sure is coming into play here is the starting point for which people starting reading Spider-Man. The "nostalgia" factor definitely comes into play. At least for me, as a product of the 80's - writers like Stern, DeMatteis, DeFalco, David, Mantlo will rate high because of my fond memories as a kid collecting comics. That's not to say writers like JMS or Slott are bad, I'm just at a different stage in my life where the 'impressionable youth' factor has worn off.

    That being said, Bendis and Jenkins cracked my top ten and they're both Y2K writers that really got me back into comics after the cesspool that was the late 90's.
    Of course there is a complementary effect to the nostalgia effect: There is a danger that people who started reading Spider-Man later will be unfamiliar with the work of earlier writers. Not every fan will go back to look for back issues and reprints. And this works especially go to the disadvantage of those writers who did not work on Amazing Spider-Man, but one of the secondary titles which are less well represented in reprints, e. g. Bill Mantlo, who worked mainly on (Peter Parker the) Spectacular Spider-Man, which during his first run was the #3 book after ASM and MTU, and who AFAIK never got a "Spider-Man Visionaries" TPB.

    In the interests of full disclosure: I started reading Spider-Man in the mid-1970s, so you're not going to be surprised that Stan Lee and Gerry Conway figure high on my list. OTOH Bill Mantlo was edged out of my Top 11 by Louise Simonson and Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, I put Bendis and Straczyski above Stern, and Roy Thomas, Len Wein, and Marv Wolfman do not even crack my top 20 (which however includes Dan Jurgens and Kaare Andrews).

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