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  1. #46
    Senior Member PupsOfWar's Avatar
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    Nah man, the old Kirk Alyn serial is where it's at!

    Well, I'm not sure why I say that.
    Kirk Alyn was not nearly the Superman that either Reeves was.
    Pretty much everyone else was also inferior.
    Something about the production values, where it came off more as a radio show that happened to be acted out on a screen with movin' pictures than a proper TV show at all, must appeal to me I guess.
    Last edited by PupsOfWar; 12-28-2012 at 12:49 AM.

  2. #47
    Senior Member Ish Kabbible's Avatar
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    The one thing that always bothered me about The Adventures of Superman stems from the origin episode.
    Pa Kent dies from a heart attack and shortly after Clark says goodbye to Ma Kent to start his life in Metropolis. Ma Kent is never mentioned again on the TV show. No calls, no visits, out of sight, out of mind. An old woman left alone on a farm. Did he send her any money from his paycheck each week? Not a good example for impressionable kids watching the show.
    Another odd thing was I don't recall Clark owning a car. Lois had one. But Clark always seemed to walk to work. Maybe he flew to that alleyway next to the Daily Planet and walked from there but as a daily routine its rather risky.
    No car, no girlfriend and a rather empty apartment,never saw him eat anything-what did he do with his money?

  3. #48
    Creator Bill Finger The Bat-Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mat001 View Post
    For the most part they were trying to stick to the early Golden Age stories, with a dash of the later Golden Age tales. Hence Clark was fully powered and could even time travel.
    George Reeves' Superman couldn't time travel. In the time travel episode, "Through the Time Barrier," it was Professor Oscar Quinn Twiddle's time machine invention that caused Clark, Lois, Perry White, Jimmy Olsen, Turk Jackson and Professor Twiddle to time travel to prehistoric 50,000 B.C. Still having all of his powers Superman tries to time travel for the first time and discovers that he can't. He explains to Lois, "I'm sorry, Miss Lane, I can't do it. I can't crack the time barrier. I can't fly through time." It was Professor Twiddle's time machine, with the aid of a metal that Professor Twiddle describes as giving off neutral isotonic rays with compact atoms called Carborium X that Superman retrieves from a meteor in space, which brought them all back from prehistoric times.
    Jerry Siegel/Joe Shuster, Bill Finger/Bob Kane, William Moulton Marston. Creators of the most enduring iconic archetypes of the comic book superhero genre and its powerful legacy.

  4. #49
    Senior Member Ish Kabbible's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=The Bat-Man;16374597]George Reeves' Superman couldn't time travel.
    [QUOTE]

    But he could super-levitate Jimmy, split into 2 separate people when in jail, and I recall an episode where he can turn into a phantom and pass through walls.

  5. #50
    Senior Member misslane38's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ish Kabbible View Post
    Must have got you confused with another poster with your name and their snarky comment that Reeves was one dimensional. If it wasn't a criticism, then I guess it was a compliment. That darn reading comprehension of mine couldn't fathom the nuance
    It wasn't a snarky comment. It was a statement of fact stated as fact: "He was one dimensional." There was no nuance to fathom. If you added your own negative spin to my comment, then that's on you.

  6. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by misslane38 View Post
    It wasn't a snarky comment. It was a statement of fact stated as fact: "He was one dimensional." There was no nuance to fathom. If you added your own negative spin to my comment, then that's on you.
    Is there any way to state something is one-dimensional without implying a negative comparison, though? It's like describing a person as plain or average-looking. It can be factually true, but it's not a comment you make without understanding it will be read as a negative. Can you picture a positive review of something that would describe something as "one-dimensional" and not have that be the reviewer pointing to something weak in a performance he otherwise enjoyed?

  7. #52
    Senior Member misslane38's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Clark View Post
    Is there any way to state something is one-dimensional without implying a negative comparison, though? It's like describing a person as plain or average-looking. It can be factually true, but it's not a comment you make without understanding it will be read as a negative. Can you picture a positive review of something that would describe something as "one-dimensional" and not have that be the reviewer pointing to something weak in a performance he otherwise enjoyed?
    If the comment was made in a negative context (i.e. a critical review), then maybe I could understand that sort of interpretation. Given that my first post in the thread was complementary towards the show, however, it seems unlikely that I thought the simplistic characterization of Superman/Clark detracted from its quality and my enjoyment. Context is key.

  8. #53
    I'm a Junior Member! Kilgore Trout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by misslane38 View Post
    Blah-blah-hate-blah-blah-anger...
    Nothing like high-jacking a positive thread with negative nonsense X 10... Whata buzz kill.

    You made your point, why rehash it 50 times?

    Context? Here's some context gleaned from your redundant posts: I bet you use your personality as birth control...
    I live in America. It's not a country, it's a business.

  9. #54
    Veteran Member Fate's Faith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ish Kabbible View Post
    The one thing that always bothered me about The Adventures of Superman stems from the origin episode.
    Pa Kent dies from a heart attack and shortly after Clark says goodbye to Ma Kent to start his life in Metropolis. Ma Kent is never mentioned again on the TV show. No calls, no visits, out of sight, out of mind. An old woman left alone on a farm. Did he send her any money from his paycheck each week? Not a good example for impressionable kids watching the show.
    Another odd thing was I don't recall Clark owning a car. Lois had one. But Clark always seemed to walk to work. Maybe he flew to that alleyway next to the Daily Planet and walked from there but as a daily routine its rather risky.
    No car, no girlfriend and a rather empty apartment,never saw him eat anything-what did he do with his money?
    Yeah, don't think they ever addressed what happened with Ma. Though I think it was nice in the Christopher Reeve Superman film that they addressed half his check went to her. Of course she died some time between then and Superman III.

  10. #55
    Creator Bill Finger The Bat-Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ish Kabbible View Post
    But he could super-levitate Jimmy
    Actually, that was Lois that both Perry White and Superman did the levitating trick on in the "Magic Secret" episode. Clark states that Perry White use to belong to an Amateur Magic Society. Maybe Zatara was the head of the Magic Society and granted them that ability.

    split into 2 separate people when in jail
    With Professor Lucerne's help, Superman discovered that he could expand his atomic structure by driving his molecules further apart and separate them and split into two in the "Divide and Conquer" episode, but it requires extraordinary concentration and willpower and each half of himself was only half as powerful. He could be wounded by bullets, and even flying was difficult. There was a danger that he might not have enough power to fuse himself together again and both halves of himself could die if he stayed separated for too long.

    I recall an episode where he can turn into a phantom and pass through walls.
    Again with Professor Lucerne's help, Superman discovered that he could rearrange the molecules of his own body, merge and mesh them with the alloys molecules to passes through a wall in the "Mysterious Cube" episode but it required an extraordinary degree of concentration and willpower and there was a risk that he might remain forever merged in a wall.

    The one thing that always bothered me about The Adventures of Superman stems from the origin episode.
    Pa Kent dies from a heart attack and shortly after Clark says goodbye to Ma Kent to start his life in Metropolis. Ma Kent is never mentioned again on the TV show. No calls, no visits, out of sight, out of mind. An old woman left alone on a farm. Did he send her any money from his paycheck each week? Not a good example for impressionable kids watching the show.
    Well, other than the origin episode, the show focused on Clark's time working as an investigative reporter on stories, and of course his adventures as Superman fighting crime, rather than his time off. We don't see every single moment of Clark's life on the show. We are left to assume that he did likely call and visit Ma Kent on holidays at least. There never was a Christmas episode, unfortunately.

    Another odd thing was I don't recall Clark owning a car. Lois had one. But Clark always seemed to walk to work. Maybe he flew to that alleyway next to the Daily Planet and walked from there but as a daily routine its rather risky.
    No car,
    Clark Kent drove many cars. Clark had his own car, the 1953 Nash-Healey sportscar was obviously Clark's own car. Clark also drove Daily Planet company cars for staff.

    The first car we see Clark driving was a 1951 Chrysler New Yorker convertible. Clark is seen driving the Chrysler in the episodes "Rescue" and "The Deserted Village."


    The second car Clark is shown driving was Clark's 1953 Nash-Healey convertible sportscar. Clark's Nash-Healey is seen in the black and white episodes "The Dog Who Knew Superman," "The Man Who Could Read Minds," and the color episodes "King For A Day" and "Clark Kent, Outlaw." Clark gives Jimmy Olsen the key to his car to drive in an emergency in the episode "Mr. Zero."

    Last edited by The Bat-Man; 12-30-2012 at 02:37 PM.
    Jerry Siegel/Joe Shuster, Bill Finger/Bob Kane, William Moulton Marston. Creators of the most enduring iconic archetypes of the comic book superhero genre and its powerful legacy.

  11. #56
    Creator Bill Finger The Bat-Man's Avatar
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    The third car Clark Kent drove was a 1953 Nash-Rambler convertible Daily Planet staff car with a back set. Clark is seen driving the Nash-Rambler in the episodes "Beware the Wrecker" and "Star of Fate."


    The forth car Clark Kent drove was a 1955 Plymouth Belvedere four-door sedan. This Plymouth is seen in the episodes "The Wedding of Superman" and "The Deadly Rock."

    Jerry Siegel/Joe Shuster, Bill Finger/Bob Kane, William Moulton Marston. Creators of the most enduring iconic archetypes of the comic book superhero genre and its powerful legacy.

  12. #57
    Creator Bill Finger The Bat-Man's Avatar
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    The fifth car Clark Kent drove was a 1955 Chrysler Imperial Newport Coupe, which Perry White explains is one of the Daily Planet staff company cars. Clark says his own car is in the shop getting it's tyres fixed. Clark drives the 1955 Chrysler in the episode "The Town that Wasn't."
    Last edited by The Bat-Man; 12-30-2012 at 09:19 AM.
    Jerry Siegel/Joe Shuster, Bill Finger/Bob Kane, William Moulton Marston. Creators of the most enduring iconic archetypes of the comic book superhero genre and its powerful legacy.

  13. #58
    Creator Bill Finger The Bat-Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ish Kabbible View Post
    no girlfriend
    Clark not having a girlfriend and the girls being attracted to Superman instead was faithful to the classic Superman mythos. Lois was obviously attracted to Superman and wanted to marry him as seen in the "The Wedding of Superman" episode where Lois even dreamed that Superman purposed marriage to her and that they had a wedding.

    There was also policewoman Helen O'Hara who Superman purposes marriage to and she accepts in the "Superman's Wife" episode. Superman and Helen O'Hara weren't really married. Superman figured that if the public thought they were married, Mister X would try to get at Superman through his wife, and hold her for ransom. And Superman wanted her to get inside the gang to learn who Mister X was, where his hideout was located and what his plans were.



    and a rather empty apartment,
    Clark's apartment is fully furnished and decorated.


    never saw him eat anything
    We see Clark eating donuts and drinking ginger ale in the episode "The Secret of Superman." We see Clark eating a turkey sandwich and drinking coffee in the episode "Jungle Devil." We see Clark eating a sandwich and drinking milk in the episode "My Friend Superman." Clark eats pork and beans and drinks coffee in the episode "The Boy Who Hated Superman." Clark has a raspberry milkshake, eats steak and drinks coffee in the episode "Olsen's Millions." We see Clark drink another raspberry milkshake in the episode "King for a Day." Clark eats a sandwich with American cheese and drinks milk in the episode "Jimmy the Kid." Superman eats lemon meringue pie in the episode "Flight to the North." Clark eats an ensalada with refried beans in the episode "The Brainy Burro." We also see Clark eat Frosted Flakes cereal, and he eats Sugar Smacks cereal (now called Honey Smacks), and Corn Flakes cereal in the Kellogg's commercials.

    -what did he do with his money?
    He must have paid for his car, paid the rent for his apartment, payed the bills, bought gas for his car, bought personal items like toilet paper, soup, laundry detergent, food, and he likely helped Ma Kent out financially if she needed it, of course we didn't see him do mundane things like that on the show because that's not very entertaining to watch.
    Jerry Siegel/Joe Shuster, Bill Finger/Bob Kane, William Moulton Marston. Creators of the most enduring iconic archetypes of the comic book superhero genre and its powerful legacy.

  14. #59
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    Great post! Love that roadster!!

    Who wants to see all every day things? For example, did he ever leave his fly open because men do at times. With supermemory, he wouldn't. Thus, he did on purpose to fool Lois. But then you could see his red panties. - It can get ridiculous.

  15. #60
    Senior Member Ish Kabbible's Avatar
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    Great response Bat-man. Proves how my memory from decades ago watching the show resembles swiss cheese. Guess its time to get the DVDs and watch them again

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