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  1. #16
    *choke* Dan B. in the Underworld's Avatar
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    Anthro I remember fondly from childhood, but not quite well enough to rank it among the series I did pick, since the only issue I own these days is a beat-up #1 obtained as an eBay throw-in 3 or 4 years ago.
    I tend to split superhero comics fans into "People who like Krypto" and "People who don't like Krypto."
    Basically, if you miss the wonder of a dog flying around in a little Superman cape, you're in the wrong hobby.

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  2. #17
    Variant Hunter METAROG's Avatar
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    3. Swordquest 1-3 1982

    These are a set of mini-comics that came packaged with the 3 Swordquest Atari 2600 video games back in the early 80’s. They tell the story of a set of twins who are offered a quest that once completed will give them their heart’s desire. The quests include numerous near impossible challenges against beings representing the 4 natural elements (Earth, Fire, etc) that once completed grant them an item of power. The 4th issue was never published so we never know what the outcome was but you can probably figure out that the good guys will win out in the end.

    The scripting by Thomas and Conway is good indeed for this sort of adventure and it is a competent “overcoming all obstacles” story. However, in my opinion, this is the finest work of art by Perez and Giordano in my collection. The comics are on slick paper and of smaller size but have incredibly detailed panels and rich full textures that make this series come alive. It really is surprising to find such amazing artwork in a pack-in mini-comic but I was blown away when I read these.

    I must confess that I don’t have the third issue and have only read it online as it is uber-rare. The Waterworld video game it was included in was a very limited release and is thus highly sought after by Atari 2600 completists. Still ,the first two are easy enough to find and if you are a fan of Perez art-those are issues you should take a look at.



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  3. #18
    *choke* Dan B. in the Underworld's Avatar
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    3. Shade, the Changing Man #s 1-8 (DC, Jul 1977-Sep 1978)

    Another one that's shown up on several people's lists already, & they've waxed most eloquent in articulating its merits, leaving me with little else to say other than this was Ditko as his most unbridled, than which I can think of no greater a selling point.

    And also that while I can't say for sure without sitting down & checking out a bunch of Mike's Amazing World monthly newsstand listings (which no doubt I'll do at some point, just for my own edification), I feel pretty confident in saying that this was the last series to really capture my imagination & enthusiasm before I said goodbye to comics for a quarter-century in 12/78. If Shade had continued, I have a sneaking suspicion that I might well have made it the single exception to my full-scale sabbatical.



    I tend to split superhero comics fans into "People who like Krypto" and "People who don't like Krypto."
    Basically, if you miss the wonder of a dog flying around in a little Superman cape, you're in the wrong hobby.

    -- Reptisaurus!

  4. #19
    Cute.5 Aaron King's Avatar
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    3. Scene of the Crime #1-4 (May 1999-August 1999)

    This and my number 2 are both repeats, which means I'll have a hard time finding anything new to say. Scene of the Crime is noir with likeable, well-developed protagonists, which is something I don't see very often. Where most detectives are inscrutable and hard, Brubaker's internal narration really gets into the head of the main character.

    I keep hoping he incorporates this book into his Criminal universe.
    All-Star Western, Casanova, Criminal, Daredevil, Dark Horse Presents, Funnies, Hellboy/BPRD, King City, Orc Stain, Snarked, Unwritten, Usagi Yojimbo

  5. #20
    *blink* Chris N's Avatar
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    Default 3. Infinity Gauntlet

    Infinity Gauntlet #1-6
    by Jim Starlin, George Perez, Ron Lim, and Joe Rubinstein,
    with Tom Christopher and Bruce Solotoff

    This is always a hard series for me to rank. I look at it through three different lenses. Who I was when I read it, who I am now when I'm feeling cynical, and who I am now when feeling less cynical.

    On the one hand, this is Starlin's 3rd time telling the story of Thanos gaining the power of a god to destroy the universe in an attempt to please Death. It echoes many of the themes, and even steals lines of dialogue. Also telling the story requires resurrecting characters who were perhaps better off staying dead. Also, the art is inconsistent, as Perez quits in the middle to be replaced by Ron Lim.

    On the other hand, this is an epic superhero adventure like few others. The first issue is a masterpiece of setting up tension. In contrast to later crossovers, Starlin is able to balance his large cast of characters, giving every character a voice, treating none like wallpaper. Issue 4 is the epic battle issue where the heroes fight valiantly but futilely against Thanos. With Captain America's final stand being immensely memorable. In issue 5, Thanos battles the combined might of the deities of the Marvel Universe, in the biggest and coolest gathering of Marvel's cosmic characters ever: Eternity, Galactus, the Watcher, Celestials... And it comes to an intriguing ending, drawing from the two previous stories and bringing it to a thematic close. After 5 issues of cosmic battle, the ending is surprisingly somber and philosophical (recalling for example the ending of the Korvac saga). I think this is a good comic, and decades of failed crossovers make you appreciate how delicate a balancing act is to make it work.

    On the most important hand, I read this within my first year of reading comics, and no other story influenced my continued love of comics and superheroes in my formative years as much as this one. At the age of 9, having discovered and been enthralled by the Marvel Universe just 6 months earlier, this was my introduction to Marvel's cosmic verse, to Thanos, Warlock, as well of tons of superheroes I was yet to meet. Big and epic and melodramatic, and bursting with colorful characters, yet fitting nicely into 6 issues, and being surprisingly rich... there is little I love more than this.

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  6. #21
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    #3 Grendel: Black, White and Red #1-4 by Matt Wagner and Various artists (Dark Horse, 1998-1999)



    This was a late entry onto my list and a personal favorite. Grendel is one of my all time favorite characters, and this series fleshed out the Hunter Rose version of Grendel, who had met his demise in Devil by the Deed.

    Creator Matt Wagner wrote several short stories this time around while over a dozen artists contributed artwork such as Paul Chadwick, John Paul Leon, Guy Davis, Pander Brothers, Stan Shaw, Tim Sale, Jay Geldhof and more. Each artist depicted their own vision of Grendel with some fascinating results.

    The series is colored only in black, white, and red, adding to the noir ambiance of Hunter Rose's violent world. The rare 16-page story "Devil's Vagary" is also included here. A sequel to the series came out in 2002 called "Red, White and Black", and is equally as immersive.


  7. #22
    Nice Melons DubipR's Avatar
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    3. DOC SAVAGE
    1-8 (Marvel) 1972-1974



    This was my first introduction to the Man of Bronze before I got into the novels and the Ron Ely film. Written by Steve Englehart using Lester Dent's scripts and Ross Andru, Doc and the Fabulous Five came alive with two-fisted action. No capes, just strength and smarts. All the nods to Dent's character are there; the 86th Floor on the Empire State Building, his autogryo. This went 8 issues and then the Curtis magazines came out (which I also love) but picking these up when I was 8 back in 1983 I fell in love with pulps. The covers on this run are killer: Andru, Steranko, Gil Kane, Buckler... not bad for 8 issues.
    "If you live among wolves you have to act like a wolf."

  8. #23
    Elder Member thwhtGuardian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Gravity View Post
    #3 Grendel: Black, White and Red #1-4 by Matt Wagner and Various artists (Dark Horse, 1998-1999)
    This is one of those titles I always want to get a hold of but just never seem to for one reason or another. I love the team of Matt Wagner and Guy Davis from Sandman Mystery Theater so it would be a treat to see that again.

    Maybe this year will be the year.

  9. #24
    Frugal fanboy Cei-U!'s Avatar
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    I'm beginning to think I really ought to read Shade the Changing Man. I bought #1 off the stands on a whim but it didn't make the short "buy every issue" list the teeny-tiny budget of a government-funded art major necessitated. That first issue was part of a huge trade deal I made in the mid-Eighties, alas, so I don't even remember it well. Is it available in TPB?

    Cei-U!
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  10. #25
    *choke* Dan B. in the Underworld's Avatar
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    Alas, AFAIK the only reprint volume is DC's Steve Ditko Omnibus Vol. 1, which is awfully danged expensive -- $32-plus even from the cheapest Amazon Marketplace sellers even as I type. If a genuinely inexpensive version ever shows up I'd go for it, even though I own the inidividual issues, because the collection includes the Cancelled Comics Cavalcade appearance of never-otherwise-published #9, I gather.
    I tend to split superhero comics fans into "People who like Krypto" and "People who don't like Krypto."
    Basically, if you miss the wonder of a dog flying around in a little Superman cape, you're in the wrong hobby.

    -- Reptisaurus!

  11. #26
    Cute.5 Aaron King's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cei-U! View Post
    I'm beginning to think I really ought to read Shade the Changing Man. I bought #1 off the stands on a whim but it didn't make the short "buy every issue" list the teeny-tiny budget of a government-funded art major necessitated. That first issue was part of a huge trade deal I made in the mid-Eighties, alas, so I don't even remember it well. Is it available in TPB?

    Cei-U!
    I summon the lost classic!
    I have some random issues (1, 2, 7) that I'd be happy to send you fo' free. I'm trying to get rid of most of my single issues once Christmas is over. Send me a PM if you're interested.
    All-Star Western, Casanova, Criminal, Daredevil, Dark Horse Presents, Funnies, Hellboy/BPRD, King City, Orc Stain, Snarked, Unwritten, Usagi Yojimbo

  12. #27
    Senior Member Polar Bear's Avatar
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    3. Kobra #1-7, by Kirby, Pasko, and many hands.



    This is another title I picked up sporadically at Book Nook. It was years until I had a complete set, and even longer until I got the storyline's conclusion in 5 Star Super Hero Spectacular (DC Special Series #1).

    Okay, so Kobra #1 was plotted and drawn by Kirby right before he left DC. Marty Pasko apparently fell in love with it, scripted #1, and wrote #2-7 and the eventual conclusion. But the pencilers?

    #2 - Chic Stone
    #3 - Keith Giffen
    #4 - Pat Gabriele breakdowns/Lowell Anderson finishes
    #5 - Rich Buckler
    #6-7 - Mike Nasser (who also did the story in 5 Star)

    But despite this inconsistency, Pasko kept it together. Two twin brothers are psychically linked so that each feels any strong emotion felt by the other. One, Jason Burr, is a college student. The other is Kobra, the leader of a religious cult and organized crime operation. The government enlists Jason to capture Kobra, but they aren't playing straight with him. Many super-spy stories follow, intriguingly including in the mix Randu Singh from The Demon. The storyline gets better instead of fading out, as Mike Nasser shows bravura storytelling skills with his three tales, somehow combining the best of Marshall Rogers and Neal Adams:



    The 5 Star Super-Hero Spectacular is rather shocking, considering the seven issues preceding it. After that, Kobra goes on to menace Aquaman, Wonder Woman, Superman, and Batman & the Outsiders in several pre-Crisis multi-issue storylines. He remains one of my favorite DC super-villains to this day.
    Anyway, it is cool for you to acquire acrimony of crumbling time on blast this website.
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  13. #28
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
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    3. Walt Disney's Christmas Parade vol. 1 (9 issues, cancelled series, Dell 1949)



    First off, I'll take any opportunity I can get to include original, non-reprint Carl Barks Duck stories in this list. Second, this series also included great work from some of my favorites of Barks' contemporaries, including Bob Gregory and Carl Fallberg.

    But, most important of all, this series truly had character. Barks and Gregory, in particular, defined the mood of Christmas for me almost as well as Charles Schultz and the Peanuts did. There's a calm, an excitement, and an inevitable number of problems, societal expectations, and relationship issues cluttering up the picture that irritate the protagonist even while we know all will be right by the end. It's hard not to draw parallels to our own lives during the holiday season and find comfort in that, especially when the conflicts are always so close to our own and seldom attempting to go for the more generic and predictable holiday stories. Santa rarely appears in these and, in fact, several stories outright portray who's really buying the presents for the kids, though this is kept subtle enough for young children to safely disregard such info. While these stories maintain a sense of childhood humor and wonder (the one where Mickey and Goofy are trying to move the hibernating bears out of their cabin is probably my all time favorite for sheer slapstick), they're almost always told from the adult's perspective, portraying adult problems and irritations around the holiday, empathizing with the adult in us while appealing to the inner child.

    In recent years, we've made a holiday tradition of pulling out the newer reprints of these stories to share throughout advent, and my 4 year old enjoys the humor and excitement nearly as much as I do, while my 18 month old attempts to turn the pages with great gusto because she loves the bright colors and cute pictures. Truly, these stories, like all Barks and Gregory Duck stories, appeal to children of all ages.
    Last edited by shaxper; 12-22-2012 at 01:23 PM.

  14. #29
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris N View Post
    Infinity Gauntlet #1-6

    This was on my short list but ultimately got cut, simply because I felt the first four issues were far more exciting than the remainder of the series. The climax, depending more upon Thanos' granddaughter than any god, hero, nor even Thanos' own self-doubt, felt disappointing to me.

    Still, undoubtedly great story, especially with Perez' art, and that killer first issue cover!


    And I have to admit it's a bit comforting to see our choices diverge from one another on occasion

  15. #30
    Hardcover addict dupont2005's Avatar
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    Cadillacs And Dinosaurs #1-6

    Super fun story that seems to have possibly been somewhat influenced by Jaime's early Love And Rockets stories and spectacular illustration. A concept that went from underground comix to Saturday Morning Cartoons. I'm actually still working on tracking down the final issues of Xenozoic Tales.
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