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  1. #166
    Veteran Member Fate's Faith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by misslane38 View Post
    Just because his duty as Superman requires he sacrifice time with the job he loves (and in prior continuity the woman he loves) doesn't mean he views it as a hobby or that it is a hobby. In the New 52 he sees journalism as a responsibility as well because of the power of words to influence society. Beyond that, I think it's sad to think that couples who have different jobs and can't spend every waking moment together are considered lesser in your eyes. Don't you see? The fact that we see Superman and Lois navigate love and duty is something that helps us appreciate their nobility all the more. It even sends a larger message about heroism and love in general. With Diana removing all conflict from Superman's life as you describe, particularly if she becomes a reporter too, then I feel the story loses a great source of pathos and drama. As an aside, I recommend you watch two episodes of Smallville called "Hex" and "Warrior" written by Bryan Q. Miller, which both illustrate these ideas in a succinct, touching, and entertaining way. They're some of the show's best, honestly.
    I've argued in threads before that Lois was always coming in second to Superman. And for the same reasons. Perhaps you're getting hung up on the word hobby or something. But the idea is that everything he does is sacrificed at the alter of being Superman. That's one of the things that makes him heroic to me. There is just never going to be that time when he isn't going to save the school bus over getting the story. Or spending time with his wife. Or spending it with a new girlfriend. But at least Wonder Woman can keep up better than Lois could. At least she can help save that bus with him. That's why I felt Lois sacrificed more because he does have the choice. He can put her (or his job first). He just doesn't. They are hobbies to his real job.

  2. #167
    Senior Member misslane38's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fate's Faith View Post
    I've argued in threads before that Lois was always coming in second to Superman. And for the same reasons. Perhaps you're getting hung up on the word hobby or something. But the idea is that everything he does is sacrificed at the alter of being Superman. That's one of the things that makes him heroic to me. There is just never going to be that time when he isn't going to save the school bus over getting the story. Or spending time with his wife. Or spending it with a new girlfriend. But at least Wonder Woman can keep up better than Lois could. At least she can help save that bus with him. That's why I felt Lois sacrificed more because he does have the choice. He can put her (or his job first). He just doesn't. They are hobbies to his real job.
    I am getting hung up on the word "hobby" because that's not the correct word to describe the role of journalism in Clark Kent's life. Clark chose to be a journalist because he loves it but also because it is a job he can do without keeping regular hours. He may sacrifice a story or two -- occasionally fall behind on his assignments -- but he gets the job done when it matters. Clark Kent is a journalist because it is his career not his hobby. Clark chose to be a journalist in part because it was a "real job" that he could do while doing his other "real job." Based on his characterization in the New 52, Superman does not view his work at the Daily Planet as any less important than his work as a hero. Writing news stories is not something Clark does for fun or to pass the time. It's a bona fide career.

    Superman, Wonder Woman, and Lois Lane all make sacrifices for the work they do. While Superman was out saving the world as a superhero, Lois was with him in spirit by saving the world with her stories. Superman and Wonder Woman save the bus, but Lois Lane covers the entire thing for the DP or PGN. Being a superhero is a responsibility, so spending time with Wonder Woman in the process of helping people does not in any way negate the sacrifices heroes must make in their private lives. Saving the bus isn't a time for connecting, bonding, relaxing, or having fun, you know? A relationship with another superhero, in fact, could actually reinforce the heroic and sacrificial side of both their lives. Due to their shared sense of duty, there would likely be times when being a hero could consume them. That's why it's so important for heroes like Superman and Wonder Woman to have significant connections with civilians and active civilian lives. Superman can talk about renewing himself by remembering Smallville or unplugging in his Clark Kent disguise, but such restorative practices when a hero has a life outside being a hero to return to when the world doesn't need him.

  3. #168
    Senior Member AJBopp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by misslane38 View Post
    I am getting hung up on the word "hobby" because that's not the correct word to describe the role of journalism in Clark Kent's life. Clark chose to be a journalist because he loves it but also because it is a job he can do without keeping regular hours. He may sacrifice a story or two -- occasionally fall behind on his assignments -- but he gets the job done when it matters. Clark Kent is a journalist because it is his career not his hobby.
    Originally he became a journalist because it was a way to get informed of things that needed Superman's attention, and provided legitimate access to information that Superman couldn't get. It was one of the tools in his tool chest. These days I'm not sure that's so true anymore. It seems that now his reason for being a journalist is because it allows him to do good for humanity in ways that Superman cannot do.

    In either case, though, I think he's a journalist as an extension to the things he can do as Superman...he uses it as another power. There are other careers he might have chosen, but being a police officer, for instance, would not have worked as well in his effort to appear mild mannered in civilian life.
    In my opinion is implied in every post. Please make an effort to remember that.

  4. #169
    Senior Member misslane38's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AJBopp View Post
    Originally he became a journalist because it was a way to get informed of things that needed Superman's attention, and provided legitimate access to information that Superman couldn't get. It was one of the tools in his tool chest. These days I'm not sure that's so true anymore. It seems that now his reason for being a journalist is because it allows him to do good for humanity in ways that Superman cannot do.

    In either case, though, I think he's a journalist as an extension to the things he can do as Superman...he uses it as another power. There are other careers he might have chosen, but being a police officer, for instance, would not have worked as well in his effort to appear mild mannered in civilian life.
    Yes, exactly, being a journalist isn't just a hobby Superman plays at as a way to stay informed or stay occupied. It's a career he genuinely believes in, cares about, and wants to succeed in over the long-term. When I said part of what makes journalism appeal to Superman is the flexibility of its hours and demands, I hope it didn't seem like I was suggesting being a reporter was purely a matter of convenience. A flexible schedule is just part of what makes his job appealing and functional, but it's sort of the cherry on top instead of the whole sundae.

  5. #170
    Senior Member AJBopp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by misslane38 View Post
    When I said part of what makes journalism appeal to Superman is the flexibility of its hours and demands, I hope it didn't seem like I was suggesting being a reporter was purely a matter of convenience.
    Nope, I'm agreeing with you, I think ;)
    In my opinion is implied in every post. Please make an effort to remember that.

  6. #171
    Elder Member zryson's Avatar
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    Pretty much nothing at this point. Their relationship is poorly constructed/handled. Its more a sales gimmick than anything substantial sadly.

  7. #172
    Veteran Member Sacred Knight's Avatar
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    The construction has been fine from my vantage point. It hasn't been rushed, effort has been put forth in the building process. Can't see anything poorly handled in that. My worst fears were alleviated when what didn't happen was a kiss and then suddenly OMG WE'RE AN ITEM! just to get the "canon" official and move on. There was a catalyst, impromptu kiss, brief awkwardness, now getting to know each other better on a personal level. And with a side of wacky time travel intrigue waiting in the wings later. That's not lacking substance as far as I'm concerned.
    Last edited by Sacred Knight; 12-23-2012 at 06:50 PM.

  8. #173
    Paladin Kurosawa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by misslane38 View Post
    Part 2 of 2



    That's the thing, though. Clark doesn't have to keep secrets. Secret keeping's old justification -- the threat of villains attacking loved ones -- was based on a narrative framework that cast the primary relationship as that between Superman and Lois Lane and not Clark Kent and Lois Lane. Of course, if Superman were to publicly declare his love for Lois Lane, especially as a wife, she'd be a target. But that's why a secret identity exists. Clark Kent can love Lois Lane and no one would care. Thus, not forging more intimate connections with humans who have earned a special and trusted place in Clark's life based on the fear of the possibility that the secret identity would become jeopardized amounts to little more than an illogical excuse. He doesn't fear rejection from those he loves because of his differences either, as far as I can tell. Therefore, he is making his differences an issue when, in truth, they are not one. The truth is, his decision to withhold intimacy from those he cares about is an act of cynical self-preservation. Fortunately, Superman can, and has, revealed his secret to humans, and he ultimately does that out of love for them. Ultimately, he does what his parents did and takes a chance to share his life completely with someone different than he is and someone who could be taken from him at any moment because he chooses to live in hope rather than fear.



    Both are true, and I do think that helps the relationship work in theory and in the short term, but the above is not a story. Storytelling is about a journey to overcome obstacles to achieve personal growth. Most hero's journeys (monomyths) and love stories feature a central conflict which can be internal, external, or both. What you're describing with Wonder Woman is she's Superman's easy way out. With her, he gets to avoid the question and the risks involved with going after what he really wanted, and that is to not be estranged from humanity and to be with the human Lois Lane. In The Hobbit, Bilbo is initially reluctant to go on an adventure with Gandalf and the dwarves because he likes the safety of his home. Gandalf reminds him that some of his forbears had grit and that he has often spoke of a yearning to explore. Instead of doing what was safe and what was easy, Bilbo does what every great hero does in a myth, and that is he chooses to set out on an unknown and potentially perilous path. For the Superman and Wonder Woman relationship to have been started so soon in the relaunch screams that the powers that be are not viewing this relationship as one that has the kind of drama and mileage that other relationships might.



    I don't think he seems that different overall. If you mean within a romantic context, I respectfully disagree. I can point to loads of scenes from Smallville, Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, and Pre-Flashpoint comics where Clark is quite bold.



    Do you mean you see Clark mooning in the current New 52 universe? Well, of course, he is. He can't have Lois. Remember, he's jealous of Lois' boyfriend even after kissing Diana? Yeah, not having what you want can be upsetting. Lois doesn't make him that way, though. He is responsible for his own behavior. This is apparently how Clark acts in this type of situation. If Diana had denied him, he may have acted the same way. In other words, whether he gets what he wants and not what he wants is what matters. And, as I explained before, Clark doesn't have "to lie" to Lois. On Smallville, Clark finding the courage to reveal his secret to those he loved was used for dramatic effect and to indicate when Clark had reached a certain level of maturity.

    The fact that there are currently obstacles to a relationship with Lois doesn't mean she isn't the one for him and won't be. It means those obstacles are elements the writers can use to generate a long term story with pay off--to craft a story that says something about embracing differences, having hope, and shirking any notion of separate but equal. You know, something meaningful. It's not handled it perfectly, but the BBC series Merlin relies on the idea of Merlin's secret magic. His long term secrecy and partial isolation (he shares his secret with his "wise old man" boss, Gaius) provides a lot of juicy emotional conflict and is building to a reveal that is so essential to his hero's journey and so cathartic that it's been withheld until the end. The distance between he and Lois that Clark is contriving right now is an obstacle to be overcome. Such an obstacle formed the centerpiece of Harry Potter's development in Order of the Phoenix, for instance, when he was reluctant to share the burden of his quest as "the Chosen One" with his friends and peers:

    Harry: It doesn't matter anymore, because I don't want to play anymore. All it does is make you care too much. The more you care the more you have to lose. You maybe it's just best to...
    Hermione: To what?
    Harry: To go it alone.




    If you're only comparing them based on things that don't matter like physical invulnerability and super-abilities. You know, superficial stuff. Do you think a firefighter is superior to, say, a school teacher just because one saves lives from burning buildings while the others cultivates the knowledge and character of the next generation? How can Superman be superior to humans like Lois and Steve in the ways that matter if he credits his own human upbringing for his values and heroism? Superman and Wonder Woman are not superior to Steve and Lois aside from the physical and the shallow. Not even Clark thinks so (from Superman #14), "No mater how many times he lays eyes on her...hes always taken aback at the realization that Lois Lane is the most amazing woman he has ever met."
    I mean that more in how other people see them, not how they see themselves. Of course Superman doesn't see himself as superior to everyone else, but the fact is that he is in every way imaginable. The powers are only part of how he is superior-his morals and ethics are far beyond that of most people. Now Wonder Woman is not quite as humble as Supes and in fact her mission statement as a character proclaims the superiority of the Amazon way to the warlike world of man. Superman would never take that point of view as much as the cruelty and pettiness of people perplex him at times.
    Doomed Planet. Desperate Scientists. Last Hope. Kindly Couple.

  9. #174
    Man of tomorrow abhilegend's Avatar
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    Nothing outside of a sales gimmick.
    Superman:"I'm a newspaperman; I'll take a vacation when I die."

  10. #175
    Paladin Kurosawa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by abhilegend View Post
    Nothing outside of a sales gimmick.
    That's everything they have done since COIE.
    Doomed Planet. Desperate Scientists. Last Hope. Kindly Couple.

  11. #176
    Savior of the Universe Flash Gordon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kurosawa View Post
    That's everything they have done since COIE.
    Well to be fair, that's what has been done since the dawn. Mainstream comics always have splashy headlines and flashy titles to try and attract readers. Goes way back to the first funny book.

  12. #177
    Paladin Kurosawa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flash Gordon View Post
    Well to be fair, that's what has been done since the dawn. Mainstream comics always have splashy headlines and flashy titles to try and attract readers. Goes way back to the first funny book.
    That's true, but DC's main strategy from the mid 80's on has been the publicity stunt 5 second sound byte strat: destroying their Multiverse (relevant only to comics readers), then killing "Robin", killing Superman, raping (maybe) and crippling Batgirl, breaking Batman's back, rapes and mindwipes, more rapes, more deaths, maiming, fridging, etc...all shock value stuff to get easy publicity. At least the last two major "stunts" of a sort-Kate Kane Batwoman and now this pairing-do not hurt or degrade any characters and in the case of Kate Kane it led to a genuinely inspiring hero. So their stunts are at least a little more positive at the moment.
    Doomed Planet. Desperate Scientists. Last Hope. Kindly Couple.

  13. #178
    Senior Member hellacre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fate's Faith View Post
    I've argued in threads before that Lois was always coming in second to Superman. And for the same reasons. Perhaps you're getting hung up on the word hobby or something. But the idea is that everything he does is sacrificed at the alter of being Superman. That's one of the things that makes him heroic to me. There is just never going to be that time when he isn't going to save the school bus over getting the story. Or spending time with his wife. Or spending it with a new girlfriend. But at least Wonder Woman can keep up better than Lois could. At least she can help save that bus with him. That's why I felt Lois sacrificed more because he does have the choice. He can put her (or his job first). He just doesn't. They are hobbies to his real job.
    Not only help him save the bus but when he has to make life changing decisions, when he has to make hard choices...Superman doesn't just drop in andd save kittens anymore (just an expression to show heroism is very complex now) and the entire world is not worshipping Superman as the almighty and savior. Many still hate and fear him no matter what he does and that is a more accurate representation of how the world would be. There is no situation where everyone thinks the same. And a guy who is alien and can do things an army can? He'll always have people suspicious of him. Diana would be in the same situation and I think the world would be equally ambivalent about her too. Thing is Superman is represented with dilemmas and problems as Superman that are emotionally difficult. Lois is a reporter she is not there to interfere and save or fight bad guys. As a reporter she is an observer and to write fairly what she sees. She cannot in any way understand what he has to go through saving that bus. She cannot understand how he feels when people die under his watch. She cannot even begin to know in the first place what the JL has to wrangle with as members and even their missions which are even off world. Unless he breached confidential files and reports and blabbed to her. But hugging him and saying there there I know is kind of not true because she does not know. Her even saying so and so is right...I remember in Sacrifice when she told Clark Diana was right re killing Lord. No matter what one thought of the situation I thought she has no expertise or experience to say that. She is entitled to an opinion but she was never in Diana or Clark's situation to even know how that felt to claim what is right. Untill she goes through emotionally what they have to endure, journalism cannot allow her to understand the highs and lows of a hero . Ever. Unless they make her Superlois but then no doubt she'll learn heroism overnight unlike Clark who struggled to get it right over years. Lois as as a journalist in terms of helping Superman was never really unbiased imo. She fancied what was in his tights from day one. And he saved her all the time. She also dated and married him past continuity and kept writing and reporting about him.

    Clark blogging now is good stuff. And Diana has in the past been huge in helping in social issues. It is what she was about as the Ambassador so I think she always empatized with Clark's need to reach out to the poor and disadvantaged people. I would like to see more of that this time around with her as it is Azz is only having her fighting Gods and that is not all Diana is about. The Diana Prince id was always a way for her to try to just adapt to our world. Even while adapting, her fresh eyes of the world would be like a plus as well for someone like Clark. She is not some old cynic and there would be a lot of joy in discovering what Clark could have very well come to take a little for granted as we all do becasue it is what we know everyday.Least that is how I see it so far. I think the fact they are young and the world is very different and their personalities are different to last canon, we do need to see how DC are forging this and to me it is very good so far. The kiss was brought about by not only to loneliness and caring (yes I think it's clear Clark cares for Diana before the kiss especially how fixated he was on what was going on with her while Graves was manipulating them) but mutual attraction established from the time they saw each other (in JL#3) and now they are slowly building the relationship.

    I know the people who just waiting for it to fail have been saying things since issue #12 and Johns story has so far proved them all wrong. They speculated they ( clark and diana) will say after the kiss it was a mistake because in the past a kiss was usually just gimmick. They never expected them to talk about it and acknowledge liking it. Or she'll only date him as Superman and will not know Clark. Well we know that is not true. She knows Clark is Superman and she sees where he has come from and what he does and why he does it and so far seems very fine with it. The issue with a date in civvies is out this week (last issue they tried dating in uniform and people gaping at them) and I think we'll be pleasantly surprised again.
    Last edited by hellacre; 12-24-2012 at 05:38 AM.
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  14. #179
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    Quote Originally Posted by misslane38 View Post
    But Lois has affected national news coverage and national opinion about Superman. It's happened in the New 52. You're making claims about what a news producer can do that is not only not backed up by the facts of the story but also by real life (i.e. journalists have made significant contributions in the real world).
    Superman's media perception is based on far more players than just Lois Lane, regardless of what impact she may or may not have had in the beginning. He's an international figure, not a Metropolis one. She is one voice amongst a multitude.

    Apples and oranges and completely irrelevant. Clark Kent, journalist, is by Superman's own admission a valued part of his life and Lois Lane is his former rival and best friend in that career. You seem to keep forgetting that. The point I was making was that the relationship between Barack and Michelle doesn't depend, in the long term, on total shared experience. Joe and Jill Biden are a very happy couple, but he's Vice President and she's a school teacher. If you think the only happy and successful relationships -- or event the majority of happy and successful relationships -- are between people who do the same job then that should allow that Lois and Diana simply operate in different, yet equally important, spheres of Superman/Clark's life. It's a moot point, as a result.
    If being a journalist was equally important to Clark, has he ever blown off his commitments as a superhero to do journalistic work? It's the journalist side of his life that always takes the hit, to the extent that he seriously considered giving up that aspect of his life. The issue would not have arisen in the first place if he regarded his journalism as being equally important. Therefore, it is inaccurate to say Lois and Diana operate in equally important spheres when WW operates in the more important and critical one.

    No, I haven't seen that. Do you have actual data to back up your claims?
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/13/wo...anted=all&_r=0

    Here you go. Superhero pairing up with superhero would be an example of assortative mating.

    To tell these stories for a new generation and to find new ways to tell the same myth. Like I said before, Beauty & The Beast has been reinterpreted multiple times and is a new TV show currently, and the central pairing and the themes are the same. Smallville did a twist on the Lois and Clark relationship as well.
    Seeing Superman as a myth is a sure to ossify and calcify the character and end up making him as relevant as John Carter. Smallville's take on the Lois-Clark relationship was the best yet we've seen on television, but what unexplored territory is there for the comics version to pursue after what thirty years of them being a couple? The post-Crisis comics pairing had gotten into a rut and the only logical progression for it would have been for them to start a family.

    I thought this was the New 52. You pointed that out to me in your comment above, so why are you here using Lois' characterization from decades ago to make a point about a new era? Lois has barely been rescued at all in the New 52; she's actually had to rescue Superman TWICE. She and Steve do act heroically.
    Didn't she need super-surgery to save her life in Action Comics 10? Didn't Steve need rescuing from Graves?

    They risk their lives and face down threats for the good of others.
    Their jobs are journalist and government agent respectively. How many American journalists regularly risk their lives? Risking their lives on a regular basis is not part of their job description to nearly the same extent as it is for Superman and WW.

    No, see. It was argued that Superman should be with Wonder Woman because he wouldn't have to worry about her like he would Lois. If Diana is regularly exposed to danger, then that rationale doesn't hold. For Clark to not take a chance with Lois for the reason he explained in JL12 (he keeps secrets to protect) would he him letting fear decide love. For Superman to be shown in a heroic light, he would have to eschew the estrangement from humanity that he and Diana share and which drew them together initially, and actually risk his own heart to get close to humans despite his concerns about their possible safety.
    There is exposure to danger and ability to deal with danger. WW is very capable of dealing with risks that come her way. She doesn't need to be too concerned about getting flattened by a bus.

    I find it interesting that sales of Justice League have continued to steadily decline since the ultimate power couple was introduced back in the twelfth issue.
    JL #12 was most likely DC's best-selling issue of the month once reorders are accounted for. Sales have likely dropped since then because Jim Lee is no longer drawing it, not because of fan outrage over the prospect of a Superman-WW romance.
    The two most powerful warriors are patience and time - Leo Tolstoy

  15. #180
    Senior Member misslane38's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cactusmaac View Post
    Superman's media perception is based on far more players than just Lois Lane, regardless of what impact she may or may not have had in the beginning. He's an international figure, not a Metropolis one. She is one voice amongst a multitude.
    Yet it is almost always her voice that helps turn the tide of public opinion in Superman's favor. She's the one who prevents a few rain drops from becoming a deluge.

    If being a journalist was equally important to Clark, has he ever blown off his commitments as a superhero to do journalistic work? It's the journalist side of his life that always takes the hit, to the extent that he seriously considered giving up that aspect of his life. The issue would not have arisen in the first place if he regarded his journalism as being equally important. Therefore, it is inaccurate to say Lois and Diana operate in equally important spheres when WW operates in the more important and critical one.
    Clark can be a hero and a journalist because being a journalist allows him to be a hero without completely letting his work suffer. It's like a father who has to give up spending quality time with his kids because he wants to make enough money for their future college funds. The fact that Clark seriously considered giving up that part of his life and ultimately decided to reclaim his life as a journalist attests to its importance. If he had permanently abandoned the profession, then you would have a point. He didn't. In fact, it seems like journalism is more important to Clark than ever. Clark has even found a way (e.g. blogging) to do with work he wants to do as a journalist that complements his ideals and schedule best.

    Here you go. Superhero pairing up with superhero would be an example of assortative mating.
    Superheroes pairing up is an example of people in the same profession marrying. Assortative mating is described as follows: "people picking spouses with similar educational achievements and incomes." Not the same thing.

    Seeing Superman as a myth is a sure to ossify and calcify the character and end up making him as relevant as John Carter. Smallville's take on the Lois-Clark relationship was the best yet we've seen on television, but what unexplored territory is there for the comics version to pursue after what thirty years of them being a couple? The post-Crisis comics pairing had gotten into a rut and the only logical progression for it would have been for them to start a family.
    Grant Morrison sees Superman as a myth. Myths are stories that endure generation after generation. John Carter is not a modern myth. The unexplored territory wouldn't have to simply pick up where the Post-Crisis left off; mind you, it is ridiculous that DC and critical fans decry the marriage for not progressing when the progressive elements that were added (e.g. Chris) were ripped away from the narrative without ever utilizing them properly. The unexplored territory you are yearning for fits into the same category as the unexplored territory in Superman's relationship with Lex Luthor in the New 52 or the new types of bonds he may form with Superboy and Supergirl. In other words, all the story has to do is to retain the core elements of Superman's myth while experimenting with creative new takes on them. You don't see Morrison or Lobdell giving up on using Lex Luthor as an antagonist just because that story has been told in several permutations before, for example.

    Didn't she need super-surgery to save her life in Action Comics 10? Didn't Steve need rescuing from Graves?
    Didn't Superman need Diana and the League to rescue him from Cheetah?

    Their jobs are journalist and government agent respectively. How many American journalists regularly risk their lives? Risking their lives on a regular basis is not part of their job description to nearly the same extent as it is for Superman and WW.
    Lois Lane, for 75 years, has been a journalist well-known for risking her life for a story that could expose and take down bad guys. You must know this.

    There is exposure to danger and ability to deal with danger. WW is very capable of dealing with risks that come her way. She doesn't need to be too concerned about getting flattened by a bus.
    Lois Lane is not frequently saved from rogue buses, though. She has hardly been saved at all in the New 52; certainly not any more than any of the members of the Justice League.

    JL #12 was most likely DC's best-selling issue of the month once reorders are accounted for. Sales have likely dropped since then because Jim Lee is no longer drawing it, not because of fan outrage over the prospect of a Superman-WW romance.
    You'd think a super popular romance with DC's ultimate power couple would have cushioned the sales losses due to Jim Lee, but alas Superman and Wonder Woman are not saving the book or bringing in heaps of new readers.

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