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  1. #16
    Illustrator of Stuff Ebonyleopard's Avatar
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    TLDR, but I'm sure the article made some very valid points. Death threats over a bad story are dumb.
    Creator of Extinctioners published by www.angryvikingpress.com

  2. #17
    Junior Member Charagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DragynWulf View Post
    It IS an acceptable answer because why would you continue to buy something you don't like?
    This is such a BS answer. There is NOBODY who has ever collected comics on weekly basis that hasn't shrugged their way through a crappy arc or finished off a mini-series they didn't really care for just because they'd already invested in half of it. It could be because they like a character or because they like the creative team. Whatever the reason, if you're going to the comic shop every Wednesday, or get comics via a subscription, it means you're in for the long haul. Nobody reads reviews of each individual issue to determine whether or not they want to buy it. They are all parts to a greater whole. It's only when that whole becomes more bad than good that dropping the title becomes an option. And when it comes to the big guns like Spider-Man, that's a REALLY big whole.

    So this attitude that readers should just pop in and out of franchises on a whim is insincere at best. That's not how comics are designed to be consumed. That's not even how they're sold. Am I supposed to skip issue #19 if it's the weakest part of a story arc running from #16 to #21? Am I supposed to not buy issues #34-38 if it's a weak arc, but still part of an overall ongoing plot that spans 100 issues? (And how would you even know until AFTER you bought them?)

    Maybe if the industry went TPB only that'd be a valid viewpoint but as long as monthly issues, pull lists, and subscriptions are the standard method of sale let's not pretend that it's just that easy to drop a title.
    "The truth, that no matter how I feel, as long as I breathe, there is hope!" - Peter Parker

  3. #18
    Actually likes comics Darth Tigris's Avatar
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    On any normal day, this would annoy me.

    But ... after what happened in Connecticut last week ... I found it profoudly disappointing that some people simply refused to learn anything about how to treat fellow human beings. Proudly disappointing. Could it possibly get worse?

    Yes. People here (and in the other, longer thread) trying to justify or defend those that made the threats or the feeling they have. Seriously? I really have no idea what to do for people like this. I'm at a complete loss ...
    Keaton always said, "I don't believe in God, but I'm afraid of him." Well I believe in God, and the only thing that scares me are people that think Final Crisis is good.

  4. #19
    Junior Member capesNmasks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charagon View Post

    Maybe if the industry went TPB only that'd be a valid viewpoint but as long as monthly issues, pull lists, and subscriptions are the standard method of sale let's not pretend that it's just that easy to drop a title.
    Actually its very easy to quit a title (at least for me). This may sound a little OCD, but take two pieces of paper, right your pull list (ongoing series only) on one of the papers in list form.

    Now, every time a title is not an enjoyable read put a mark next to said title. If the next issue is good, erase all the marks. If the next issue is bad, add another mark until you reach five marks on one title. Once that happens, quit the title, erase it off your list, and place the title on the other piece of paper with the date (mm/dd) you quit it. This will help you give the title time to get better.

    The same time next year, erase the title from the paper, there by allowing you to start reading the title again if you so choose.

  5. #20
    Lawn-mowing Enthusiast EuphemismForSex's Avatar
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    I've never heard of any of the shows mentioned in that article.
    Bad news everyone...

  6. #21
    Overthinking It
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charagon View Post
    Maybe if the industry went TPB only that'd be a valid viewpoint but as long as monthly issues, pull lists, and subscriptions are the standard method of sale let's not pretend that it's just that easy to drop a title.
    Amazingly, it is that easy. There have been tons of comics that I've stopped picking up on a monthly basis, Spider-Man included. I grew up on Spider-Man, and for a long time, Spider-Man comics were the only comics I was getting. But I stopped during the Clone Saga. Picked it back up when the Clone Saga ended. Stopped during the John Byrne era. Was very off-and-on after that until Brand New Day. Yeah, I've shrugged my way through a crap story arc or two (let's be honest, I've shrugged my way through a lot), but those times I had reason to believe that the series was going to get better. If I don't have reason to believe that, I'll stop buying until I have reason to think that's going to change.

    The idea that you're stuck in a mode of buying comics you don't like is just insane to me. And that leads to people sending death threats to Dan Slott or going on the Internet and bragging about how they're going to kick his ass, because if they're stuck buying the comics, then they'd better be amazing.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charagon View Post
    This is such a BS answer. There is NOBODY who has ever collected comics on weekly basis that hasn't shrugged their way through a crappy arc or finished off a mini-series they didn't really care for just because they'd already invested in half of it. It could be because they like a character or because they like the creative team. Whatever the reason, if you're going to the comic shop every Wednesday, or get comics via a subscription, it means you're in for the long haul. Nobody reads reviews of each individual issue to determine whether or not they want to buy it. They are all parts to a greater whole. It's only when that whole becomes more bad than good that dropping the title becomes an option. And when it comes to the big guns like Spider-Man, that's a REALLY big whole.

    So this attitude that readers should just pop in and out of franchises on a whim is insincere at best. That's not how comics are designed to be consumed. That's not even how they're sold. Am I supposed to skip issue #19 if it's the weakest part of a story arc running from #16 to #21? Am I supposed to not buy issues #34-38 if it's a weak arc, but still part of an overall ongoing plot that spans 100 issues? (And how would you even know until AFTER you bought them?)

    Maybe if the industry went TPB only that'd be a valid viewpoint but as long as monthly issues, pull lists, and subscriptions are the standard method of sale let's not pretend that it's just that easy to drop a title.
    If I'm paying money its real easy to skip issues by writers/artists who work I don't like. Its call voting with your wallet. Been doing it that way since the 90's.
    Last edited by Daye; 12-20-2012 at 06:24 AM.

  8. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Charagon View Post
    This is such a BS answer. There is NOBODY who has ever collected comics on weekly basis that hasn't shrugged their way through a crappy arc or finished off a mini-series they didn't really care for just because they'd already invested in half of it. It could be because they like a character or because they like the creative team. Whatever the reason, if you're going to the comic shop every Wednesday, or get comics via a subscription, it means you're in for the long haul. Nobody reads reviews of each individual issue to determine whether or not they want to buy it. They are all parts to a greater whole. It's only when that whole becomes more bad than good that dropping the title becomes an option. And when it comes to the big guns like Spider-Man, that's a REALLY big whole.

    So this attitude that readers should just pop in and out of franchises on a whim is insincere at best. That's not how comics are designed to be consumed. That's not even how they're sold. Am I supposed to skip issue #19 if it's the weakest part of a story arc running from #16 to #21? Am I supposed to not buy issues #34-38 if it's a weak arc, but still part of an overall ongoing plot that spans 100 issues? (And how would you even know until AFTER you bought them?)

    Maybe if the industry went TPB only that'd be a valid viewpoint but as long as monthly issues, pull lists, and subscriptions are the standard method of sale let's not pretend that it's just that easy to drop a title.
    While a comic collector isn't going to drop a single issue in the middle of an arc like you say, that's not the case here, is it? This is a major status quo change and anyone can decide whether they're intrigued by what they're going to do and keep collecting or not like it and drop the title.

    I've been collecting for over 25 years and have dropped titles after collecting them for years and picked them up years later. Avengers would be a good example of this. For some simple minded tool to threaten someone's life from the anonymity of the Internet says all I need to know about their intelligence and maturity. Grow the eff up for God's sake.

  9. #24
    Junior Member darkmorgado's Avatar
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    To actually make death threats? That's seriously pathetic and I don't know how things work in the US but over here in the UK people end up before a judge for saying that sort of thing, whether it's on a forum online or not.
    "At the end of the day, it's all just storybook stuff" - Me

  10. #25

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    I don't like what they are doing but death threats to the writer isn't going to change anything. Letters, fan campaigns, no buying the book, waiting for the next movie will do more. This a change that is not going to last because I bet fans are not going to buy or b amazing spider-man squeal. I am a huge spider-man who really dislikes what they have done with spider-man since OMD and after. This going to far. It's not worth shamming yourself, the comic book fandom, and maybe going to jail.
    Save DCU from DCNU!

    Q.: How can you tell when Dan DiDio is lying?
    A.: When you see his lips move.

  11. #26
    The curious one.
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    Everyone on the board thinks that death threats are wrong. Everyone is joining in a huge chorus of anger against some guy/gal/group that has never been on cbr as far as I know. As much as I agree that the death threats are silly and very wrong I have ask: who is everyone shouting at? I find it very hard to believe that the guy/gal/group who made the death threat is sitting at home right now re-considering his/her/their actions because of a lot of heat on comic book resources.

  12. #27
    Releasing Johnny's torch Ravin' Ray's Avatar
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    I have DJ friends who say that if you just shout it out to the Universe it will somehow inexplicably find its way to the recipient in some form or another. While I don't think this will actually happen to the ones who threat, I hope they do feel the rage turned on them and back down.
    Johnny Storm was dead; who is this resurrected Johnny Storm?
    "Here, hold my Annihilus…" Johnny Storm, Fantastic Four #601

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