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  1. #76
    Senior Member foxley's Avatar
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    9. Monsters Unleashed #1 - 11 (Marvel, 1973-75)



    I didn't have time reread this run, so I am basing it's place on my list on my admittedly faulty memory. However, I am nominating it on the strength of the fantastic "Frankenstein 1973/1974" storyline that ran through the majority of the run. Written by Gary Friedrich (with Doug Monech taking over for the last few installments), this tale deals with Frankenstein's Monster being awoken in the modern world and attempting to make his way through a world in which he is even more an outsider than he was originally. Free from the constraints of the Comics Code, Friedrich was able to tell a much darker tale than the one unfolding concurrently in Marvel's mainstream Frankenstein's Monster book. Friedrich did an excellent job of capturing the essence of Shelley's noble monster trapped in a world he never asked to be in. This was ably assisted by evocative black and white art, initially by John Buscema and later by Val Mayerik.

    And a couple of covers by Boris Vallejo don't hurt either.

  2. #77
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    The fourth day of Classic Comics Christmas!

    Planet of Vampires

    Atlas-Seaboard, 1 (February, 1975) to 3 (July, 1975).


    Having sold off Marvel Comics, Martin Goodman came back with a vengeance in 1975 (in terms of cover-dates) with Seaboard Periodicals and the Atlas line of comics. Many of these made my longlist, and four series made the shortlist, viz and to wit Phoenix, Morlock 2001, Targitt and the classic currently in question, Planet of Vampires.

    This series was some bizarre kind of cross between Planet of the Apes and The Omega Man, complete with 1970s darkness and angst, despite which I found it vastly entertaining.

    Also, post-apocalyptic series Kamandi, ‘War of the Worlds’ and Planet of the Apes are ineligable for this year’s CCC…

  3. #78
    *choke* Dan B. in the Underworld's Avatar
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    9. Inferior Five #s 1-12 (DC, April 1967-October 1968, September-November 1972)

    Well, heck. I see ROK has already stolen my thunder with this one. I'll just add that only last weekend did I finally get around to reading the entire run (#s 11-12 reprinted the team's first two appearances, from Showcase #s 62 & 63; a third outing appeared in #65, after which the series debuted). As a huge fan of Marvel's Not Brand Echh (which tragically lasted *choke* 13 issues, of course), I would've loved this title as a kid, but unfortunately I don't recall it from my early spinner-rack-haunting days, even though by the time it came out I was definitely dipping my toe into the four-color pool with some regularity. Oh, well.

    I should add that ish #6 in particular is a stone classic, presenting a behind-the-scenes parody of DC's editorial & creative process. I do believe Scott Shaw! turned his Oddball Comics spotlight on this one a few years ago. Interestingly (at least to me), it also marked the swan song of the book's original cover logo & artistic team (Mike Sekowseky & Ross Andru); otherwise, the "New" in the logo is misleading.



    Last edited by Dan B. in the Underworld; 12-17-2012 at 08:57 AM.
    I tend to split superhero comics fans into "People who like Krypto" and "People who don't like Krypto."
    Basically, if you miss the wonder of a dog flying around in a little Superman cape, you're in the wrong hobby.

    -- Reptisaurus!

  4. #79
    *choke* Dan B. in the Underworld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by berk View Post
    I have to plead guilty as well. And I take back the revival idea, since I can't think of a current artist who could capture the look, although I can imagine a few contemporaries of Sekowsky's doing it - Wally Wood, for example.
    She's not in uniform (& not having read the issue since it was new, more than 4 years ago, I can't say if she ever is), but Amanda Conner did her usual bang-up job in portraying Dumb Bunny on an Ambush Bug: Year One cover:



    Gotta love Jesus Saiz' rendition of DB in particular & the team in general for the final issue of the latest (I think) incarnation of The Brave & the Bold, too, back in 2010 --

    I tend to split superhero comics fans into "People who like Krypto" and "People who don't like Krypto."
    Basically, if you miss the wonder of a dog flying around in a little Superman cape, you're in the wrong hobby.

    -- Reptisaurus!

  5. #80
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    Random thoughts on Day Four.

    Mars is one of the few First books I haven't read. Go figure.

    I liked that first Sword of the Atom book when it came out. But I'm a sucker for anything Burroughsesque. I'd have been pretty happy if they'd just left it there at number four and not gone onward.

    I keep meaning to read Goldfish. I have it. But the enormous blocks of text have always kept me from moving forward.

    I know I read Fantastic Four 1234. And I know it had absolutely no effect on me whatsoever. These are the things that make humans unique.

    Love me some Jonah Hex.

    The Fafhrd and the Grey Mouser series is outstanding. It was on my long list.

    I need to read the Inferior Five.

    I read that Black Dragon mini not super long ago. For some reason I find Bolton's work off-putting. Which probably effected the way I felt about it.

    Inferior Five and 2001. Two more of those books I keep meaning to read.

  6. #81
    *choke* Dan B. in the Underworld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slam_Bradley View Post
    For some reason I find Bolton's work off-putting. Which probably effected the way I felt about it.
    I'm the same way about Dan Brereton's art. Nothing I can put my finger on, but somehow I find the way he draws faces really dismcomfiting.
    I tend to split superhero comics fans into "People who like Krypto" and "People who don't like Krypto."
    Basically, if you miss the wonder of a dog flying around in a little Superman cape, you're in the wrong hobby.

    -- Reptisaurus!

  7. #82
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan bailey View Post
    I'm the same way about Dan Brereton's art. Nothing I can put my finger on, but somehow I find the way he draws faces really dismcomfiting.
    I haven't read much of Brereton's work. Probably only Thrillkiller and its sequel. And I was predisposed to like those books just because of the time period in which they were set.

    So thus far I've withheld judgment.
    Last edited by Slam_Bradley; 12-17-2012 at 09:09 AM.

  8. #83
    Mark Brodersen hondobrode's Avatar
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    Dr. Tomorrow # 1-12 (Acclaim 1998)

    Bart Simms has what is either the ultimate super-power, or the most worthless one. As Dr. Tomorrow, he’s a man from the future, able to employ modern technology, and a knowledge of upcoming events to alter the course of world history.

    Shortly after appearing on the scene, he became a hero in the fight against the Axis forces. By helping stop the Nazis, he may have saved untold lives. At the same time, he must face two horrifying possibilities. The first is that some slight action he undertakes could alter the future in unforeseen – and possibly catastrophic ways. Perhaps the person he saves goes on to become the world’s greatest killer, or perhaps his actions could even further prevent his future self from coming into being. But the second possibility may be even worse. What if the future is fixed, and nothing he, or anyone else, does can change anything ?

    This little gem was written by Bob Layton and each issue moves progressively closer to the here and now, with each issue featuring a different artistic team and feel for whatever era the Dr. is in during that storyline.

    # 1 - Mike Mignola cover & Don Perlin interiors
    # 2 - Bob Layton cover & Dean Zachary interiors
    # 3 - Butch Guice cover & Alex Maleev interiors
    # 4 - Bob Layton cover & Jim Hall interiors
    # 5 - Dick Giordano cover & Kevin Kobasic interiors
    # 6 - Bob Layton cover & Dick Giordano interiors
    # 7 - Tom Grindberg cover & interiors
    # 8 - Gil Kane cover & James W. Fry III interiors
    # 9 - Larry Mahlstedt cover & Gordon Purcell interiors
    # 10 - Scott McDaniel cover & Anthony Williams interiors
    # 11 - Jimmy Palmiotti cover & Andrew Wildman interiors
    # 12 - Mark Buckingham cover & Kenny Martinez interiors



    Last edited by hondobrode; 12-17-2012 at 01:13 PM.
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  9. #84
    CotM Member Rob Allen's Avatar
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    Today's entry is one we've seen before and I wouldn't be surprised to see it again before Christmas:

    Stalker by Paul Levitz, Steve Ditko and Wally Wood



    Stalker was original, imaginitive, and gorgeous to look at. Ditko and Wood are incredibly synergistic, and the story was unlike anything else. I was really disappointed when this was cancelled. That seems to be how I chose this year's list - by how upset I was when something was cancelled.

    That Black Dragon series looks like it's right up my alley. So does Open Space. I considered 2001 for this year's list, and Monsters Unleashed, and Inferior Five.
    --
    Rob Allen

  10. #85
    Ex-Cheeks Reptisaurus!'s Avatar
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    Glad to see Secret Six on the list... It was between S6 and Fat Freddy's Cat for my #9 slot (do too poor counting on my part) and I decided that there was a slightly better chance that I'd see the former rather than the latter.

    Anyway, it's one of the great high-concept shoulda-been longer series. There were a lot of those from '60s DC.
    MarkAndrew at Comics Should Be Good
    All my life, my Great Dream has been to grow a triangular head - Roy Thomas

  11. #86
    world of yesterday benday-dot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by T GUy View Post
    The fourth day of Classic Comics Christmas!

    Planet of Vampires

    Atlas-Seaboard, 1 (February, 1975) to 3 (July, 1975).


    Having sold off Marvel Comics, Martin Goodman came back with a vengeance in 1975 (in terms of cover-dates) with Seaboard Periodicals and the Atlas line of comics. Many of these made my longlist, and four series made the shortlist, viz and to wit Phoenix, Morlock 2001, Targitt and the classic currently in question, Planet of Vampires.

    This series was some bizarre kind of cross between Planet of the Apes and The Omega Man, complete with 1970s darkness and angst, despite which I found it vastly entertaining.

    Also, post-apocalyptic series Kamandi, ‘War of the Worlds’ and Planet of the Apes are ineligable for this year’s CCC…
    That's my favourite Atlas-Seaboard series as well, followed by Wulf the Barbarian.

  12. #87
    world of yesterday benday-dot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reptisaurus! View Post
    [B]
    (And, okay, I really, really like poop jokes.)
    Please see... Moebius and Druillet, a couple a French lads who have served up some very fine poop jokes indeed.

  13. #88
    Lowe/Piece/Understatement Artycool8or's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DubipR View Post
    10-XXENOPHILE
    1-11 (Palliard Press) 1989-1998
    (psst,DubipR say: " also I felt it was time we needed some T&A on the list somewhere...")

    also I felt it was time we needed some T&A on the list somewhere...
    Quote Originally Posted by icctrombone View Post
    9. Fantastic Four 1234
    Writer: Grant Morrison Artist : Jae Lee

    I always love when the writer doesn�t describe what the art is showing. The art and writing should be two separate pieces of information that , once combined, become greater than the each individually. GET THIS BOOK!!!
    Well observed, and received. It's like getting 2 things for the price of 1.


    Quote Originally Posted by METAROG View Post
    9. The Goblin 1-3 1982
    he Nebres art really made this strip. Almost all the strips have humorous overtones if not out-and-out slapstick so most were fun to read.
    Loved all the Warren stuff, but for the reasons you described Goblin was my favorite.

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Harris View Post
    Well, I owned this book for 20 years before I sent it to CGC, so I have had plenty of opportunity to read it to my heart's content.
    More precisely, You read it until it deteriorated to 7.0

    Quote Originally Posted by dupont2005 View Post
    Twisted Tales #1-10
    A horror anthology with multiple contributors
    The interior art does not disappoint either
    An absolute must.

    Quote Originally Posted by Polar Bear View Post
    #9: Deadman 1-4, Helfer & Garcia-Lopez

    An unjustly-forgotten classic of creepiness, and--in my opinion--Lose Luis Garcia-Lopez' finest comics work ever.
    Second that.

    Quote Originally Posted by thwhtGuardian View Post
    [CENTER]GiantKiller
    The thing I really like about Brereton is that his style is just so unique, it's an equal parts blending of both psychedelic and Gothic styles and it's just a perfect fit for telling pulp horror stories.
    I remember the anticipation for each book coming out in this series. Every consequent issue raises a bar for a notch higher until the final battle kicks in.
    (I know this thread is about classic comics, but for those who enjoy Brereton's art and haven't seen/read his recent works check out Last Battle (2011 Image) #0 and Punisher (2009 8th Series) #14.)

  14. #89
    Senior Member foxley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan bailey View Post
    She's not in uniform (& not having read the issue since it was new, more than 4 years ago, I can't say if she ever is), but Amanda Conner did her usual bang-up job in portraying Dumb Bunny on an Ambush Bug: Year One cover:



    Gotta love Jesus Saiz' rendition of DB in particular & the team in general for the final issue of the latest (I think) incarnation of The Brave & the Bold, too, back in 2010 --
    Phil Foglio also did his take on Dumb Bunny back in 1991:


  15. #90
    I say thee nay! icctrombone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by foxley View Post
    Phil Foglio also did his take on Dumb Bunny back in 1991:

    Hefner has to be proud...
    Life is what you make it.

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