View Poll Results: As a minority, does Marvel represent your race well?

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  • Yes

    24 22.64%
  • No

    82 77.36%
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  1. #16
    Senior Member NamorsTrident's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scribbleMind View Post
    1. Not really. At least not as far as established characters go. New minority characters introduced early in a book or a new minority character promised to play a larger role later do peak my curiosity, and I do probably lean more towards giving those books a try, but being a minority alone isn't enough to get me to buy the book. Being a minority catches my attention, but character concept and design has to reel me in. It's why I read Blue Marvel and ignored the new Power Man.

    2. Do I think Marvel is as diverse as the real world? No. Do I think that's a problem? Not at all. There's enough major black characters that are used often enough that I can't complain. Even though I hear a lot of complaints about there not being enough black heroes in comics, population-wise we've been usurped by Hispanics, but you could never tell from reading a comic book, and when someone is hispanic they tend to lay it on a little thick. Asians are similar, I find there aren't enough of them that aren't related to kung-fu, asian mythology, or chinese magic. Indians? Nigh-nonexistant (not of the Native American variety, but them too). In comparison, I think us black guys are pretty well off. Additionally, I do agree with Deep_Sleeper. When someone complains about diversity in a team full of aliens, mutants, mermen etc. I can't help but think they have a very narrow view of what diversity is. I enjoy seeing fictional members of my race go out there and take names, everyone does, but I don't even think it is necessary for every team to need minority on it, because that's not realistic and in an odd way, every team having a black guy isn't diverse. Ultimately, I am more upset that so many black guys in comics are either bald or have dreadlocks than I am at the current portrayal or use of my race on comics, and I guess that just shows you how small the issue really is to me right now.
    I agree with just about everything said here! Great post and thank you for writing this so I don't have too! ;)

  2. #17
    Member IndigoMX9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by klinton View Post
    I'm certain you did. Your Freudian slip though is telling. :p

    To address the topic at hand though:

    I, personally, don't feel tha my interests are under represented in Marvel comics. We have compelling gay characters that I'm genuinely interested in as characters (Billy and Teddy, ftw!), and strong female characters (Wanda, Ororo, Nat and Kate topping my list). Sam, Monet and Ororo are favorites of mine in the ethnic diversity arena, all of whom I can follow with regularity.

    Of course, my interests and needs are not yours nor anyone else'. My satisfaction doesn't negate another's dissasatisfaction.
    I was very disappointed when I herd of a hero named Freedom Ring, I thought that was a huge slap in the face.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedom_Ring

    Marvel made up for it on Young Avengers with Billy and Teddy. They were never defined by their sexuality, it was just a part of who they were. I think that Marvel is trying to have their comics reflect our world today.

    Since Marvel is lead by Joe Quesada and Axel Alonso, I would think that they would include a few more minorities in comics. I like how there is now Victor Alvarez, Amadeus Cho, and Humberto Lopez. Plus they are really trying to push more female books which is fantastic.

    I think that Marvel has somewhat moved away the Mad Men day's of the 1960's where everyone is a white male.

  3. #18
    Ontological Shaman AnonymousMC's Avatar
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    Though it does not effect my buying habits, it will get me to check out a title. I do think, however, that "Latinos" and "Hispanics" are grossly misrepresented and underrepresented. As far as Marvel there is Miss America Chavez, White Tiger, Echo...and...um...EXACTLY!
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  4. #19
    Ontological Shaman AnonymousMC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IndigoMX9 View Post
    I was very disappointed when I herd of a hero named Freedom Ring, I thought that was a huge slap in the face.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedom_Ring

    Marvel made up for it on Young Avengers with Billy and Teddy. They were never defined by their sexuality, it was just a part of who they were. I think that Marvel is trying to have their comics reflect our world today.

    Since Marvel is lead by Joe Quesada and Axel Alonso, I would think that they would include a few more minorities in comics. I like how there is now Victor Alvarez, Amadeus Cho, and Humberto Lopez. Plus they are really trying to push more female books which is fantastic.

    I think that Marvel has somewhat moved away the Mad Men day's of the 1960's where everyone is a white male.
    You can add Reptiel and Power Man to that limited list.
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  5. #20

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    No my race doesn't affect my buying habits. I was always more into characters I relate to more in terms of personality rather than race. As much as I want to like luke cage and miles morales, I don't.

    I think its represented pretty well. It can be a lot better, but I think its represented fairly well.

  6. #21
    I'm a male DebkoX's Avatar
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    Well as a mix raced person (father is white mother is black) yes, I feel satisfied. It's good but, even though this doesn't have any relation to me I think it's time for a transgendered hero.
    “The only thing standing between you and your goal is the bullshit story you keep telling yourself as to why you can't achieve it.”

  7. #22
    I read. I write. 42n8s1's Avatar
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    Click image for larger version. 

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    Seriously.
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  8. #23
    Sad Hawkguy in the snow CyberHubbs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deep_Sleeper View Post
    Marvel's got mutants, aliens and the Inhumans. I don't really care that they don't have a brown character.

    If Marvel ever kills off Gladiator, She Hulk, Super Skrull, Noh Varr, Warbird, Gamora, etc...I'll probably care. Maybe a little.
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    Last edited by CyberHubbs; 12-14-2012 at 10:38 AM.
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  9. #24
    Sad Hawkguy in the snow CyberHubbs's Avatar
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    Anyway. Hispanic. Puerto Rican to be exact. Not too worried about being represented in comics.
    I know Kevin Nichols through a guy that knows a gal. Small world!

    If nihilism didn't take some delight in destruction one might suspect nihilists were an unnaturally morbid sort.
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  10. #25
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    Being an Asian-American, I sometimes feel like I'm intruding even posting in threads like this because for the most part I don't feel much like a minority at all. After all, most of us live privileged, prosperous existences, we receive the best education and excel in our chosen fields, and few of us have ever really felt the sting of racism or oppression in any real sense.

    There is a flipside to this though, like it or not most fictional media include minority characters as concessions to placate their audiences, and since Asians are already fairly content, it's never really seen as a necessity to represent Asian characters at all, much less positively and non-stereotypically. Of course we bear much of the blame for this ourselves, since it's not something that really crosses our minds all that often and indeed most of us can readily identify with fictional characters regardless of ethnicity. Then again, when you really examine more closely the various examples of Asians in fiction, it really is something that induces severe disbelief. Consider for example that the neither of the two most prominent "Asian" characters at Marvel, Iron Fist and Psylocke, are actually Asian.

    Nevertheless, it's difficult for me to really work up a good rage over things like this, and I imagine it's quite the same for most others in my position, though I'm not sure if this is a good or bad sign. On one hand, excluding ourselves from the Oppression Olympics saves everyone a lot of headaches, but on the other, it is indicative of a serious lack of self-confidence in our communities. Most of us don't really take much pride in our identities, and probably wish we were something else. Maybe a really well-written Marvel character can serve as an aspirational figure for the new generation of youth, but the examples we have now fall so far short of the mark as to be laughable. Perhaps it is best that we remain essentially invisible in fictional media until we can work out our own insecurities and identity issues.

  11. #26
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    I think diversity when it comes to comics is a can of worms. Most mainstream writers are White males, American or British. I think ideas like Fearless Defenders sound a bit clumsy, but it's nice that there is an effort.

    I must say though: I really hate Sam Wilson and Luke Cage, for the most part. I'm a bit insulted that, together with Cyborg, these are the Black American males.

  12. #27
    Sad Hawkguy in the snow CyberHubbs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by B. Kuwanger View Post
    I think diversity when it comes to comics is a can of worms. Most mainstream writers are White males, American or British. I think ideas like Fearless Defenders sound a bit clumsy, but it's nice that there is an effort.

    I must say though: I really hate Sam Wilson and Luke Cage, for the most part. I'm a bit insulted that, together with Cyborg, these are the Black American males.
    Cage once slapped Dr. Doom around for 200 bucks he was owed.
    I know Kevin Nichols through a guy that knows a gal. Small world!

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  13. #28
    Optic Blast, Optic Blast B. Kuwanger's Avatar
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    Despite his goofy character design (like the colors, though) I would say old school Cage was handled better. Avenger Luke was lame as hell.

  14. #29
    Roll up the PARTITION plz Imraith Nimphais's Avatar
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    1. Does race representation affect your buying habits?

    I've been buying comics for thirty-something odd years...no it does not. It never did.

    2. Is your race/sexuality well represented in Marvel comics?

    I'm a bi-racial, bi-sexual man...to the best of my knowledge, no. But then, I am not reading (nor have I ever read/bought) comics to see my "sector of society" represented, well or ortherwise. I honestly do not care, I read comics (and other publications) solely for the artistic and entertainment/escapism value.

    If it is beauty-fully illustrated and well-written I'll read it. I may gravitate towards/like certain characters more than others (Storm) but that usually has everything to do with the characters and how they are written than their race/sexuality.
    Last edited by Imraith Nimphais; 12-14-2012 at 02:32 PM.
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  15. #30

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    It's odd but on the surface, at first reading i really like that Luke Cage was somewhat of the lead for avengers. but after going back and reading some of those books again there was exposure, but no rel growth of the character. More to the point it was like he was in a bubble for the duration of his run. there was no definitive annointing of Luke truly become the leader of avengers, it was either him being pissed off at being duped, or being remoresful at being duped. there was no real developement of the layers that should showcase why this guy was worked into the leadership position. he was really written as one of the guys. aside from Luke and Tchalla there was almost no black male reppin' ANYWHERE else. To answer the question no they dont do a good job, heck they cant even match the percentage dictated in real life. I'm finding that as i get older that i will pass-up the regular waspy books for something that has any kind of black male presence in it, even if written as a good antagonist.
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