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  1. #61
    I'm the gay Batman. JimmyDee's Avatar
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    I didn't expect to see it, but I was hoping SANDMAN MYSTERY THEATRE was on that list. Guy Davis was amazing, Wagner & Seagle wrote an amazing relationship with great pulp flair.

    Aside from that, it's a pretty good list. I can dig it.
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    I ain't no hot dog, yo.

  2. #62

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    I say this with affection, but without Scalped this list is out and out wrong.
    Every never is now.

  3. #63
    Mark Brodersen hondobrode's Avatar
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    I would buy anything with the Vertigo imprint. That's good enough for me. Some of it has gotten kind of weird or off-beat, but I've never regretted buy Vertigo. Some things have been better than others. I've been hardcore into the DCnU as of late, and Valiant, and haven't kept up much with Vertigo as of late, but will eventually get everything in the imprint.

    I'm going to list some of my favorite stuff from the imprint, and that means that some things won't be on my list, like Scalped or 100 Bullets, because I'm sure they're great, but I can't honestly say as I haven't read them yet.

    Besides the obvious higher profile titles that've been previously mentioned, I thought I'd throw in some others that have been very enjoyable for me.



    Not only does Christopher Chance turn himself into a Human Target through make up, he goes so far as surgery, and later dealing with the psychological ramifications of becoming that person and disassociating from them. Peter Milligan needs more praise for this, and Javier Pulido and Cliff Chiang's clean simple linework compliments the series nicely.



    When the original Timothy Hunter mini came out, I liked it, a lot, and Books of Magic too, though I'm still working on getting the entire run. When this later series came out with a young college aged Hunter, it suddenly seemed less child-like and more adult, and in the sense that in our minds we compare the young, inexperienced Hunter, with this more sobering version, against a more stark world of evil and darkness, the series takes on a more pronounced contrast, and is even more appealing. I could've easily listed every Timothy Hunter series, but this one, when I read it, grabbed me the most.



    The main character here is depressed and recently separated from his girlfriend and decided to end it all on midnight with an overdose of sleeping pills. After having ingested them, she later surprises him at his apartment wanting to make up. Now what ?! He's got to stop the process asap in order to live. Love, lies, laughter, panic, and drama with this being the perfect example of what the form is capable of from the genius of Kyle Baker, reminding me in the best way of Harvey Kurtzman's work. Highest praise.
    Last edited by hondobrode; 12-08-2012 at 09:44 PM.
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  4. #64
    Mark Brodersen hondobrode's Avatar
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    Jonah Hex is one of those great characters that I'll buy anytime I see him including Gotham City, the future, or the weird supernatural Vertigo-verse. This is Jonah filtered through the twisted lenses of Joe Lansdale Texan author, and twisted visions of Tim Truman. The cover pretty much gives an idea of what to expect. I liked it.



    The story of a former cop turned counter-culture detective, down on his luck, gets hired by a tycoon to protect his wild teenage daughter. The daughter, Faith, seduces him and gets his help with her friends in raiding an old bank account of Al Capone's. Al wouldn't need it anymore, right ? Double finds out nothing is as it seems and he's been double-crossed. From a couple of guys that went on to do 100 Bullets.



    I held my breath everytime a new issue came out, cause this was another wonderful gem no one was buying but was at the top of the stack. Relative unknowns at the time, Andy Diggle and Jock, turned out this title about a group of "Killed In Actions" CIA agents who turned on The Agency containing traitorous individuals inside running drugs and arms. What a great premise for a series.
    Last edited by hondobrode; 12-09-2012 at 07:42 PM.
    I am what I am and that's all what I am

  5. #65
    Mark Brodersen hondobrode's Avatar
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    Northlanders was an ongoing written by rising superstar Brian Wood, with a deeper feel of the entire Viking culture instead of just plundering and looting. Don't get me wrong, that's in there too. Based around 1,000 A.D., the opening arc has Sven called back home to his father's kindgom in a northern wasteland after his father's death and his uncle's ascension to the throne. Sven wants to get his inheritance quickly and back to Constantinople for more partying. Things don't quite work out that simply. Other arcs include the first Viking sacking of an English monastery; single Viking combat; the role of women in Viking culture; a small outpost infected with a contagious disease and their story of keeping others out as well as dealing with the members they're trapped with over the course of a year; a traveling blacksmith freeing a captive girl from corrupt Christian missionaries; a grunt's POV of the raiding of Paris by the Vikings; and finally the decades-spanning drama of the crime family of the Hauksson's and the bloody beginnings of Iceland.



    Private investigator Vector Pope is in a sci-fi future on a planet ruled by religious zealots ducking the authorities, engaged with dangerous women, and drug-taking dangerous androids. This story of a missing person's case involves zero gravity sex, a prison murder and a secret held by the Pope's best friend. If you guessed Howard Chaykin might be involved with this, give yourself a gold star. Co-written by David Tischman with sumptuous art by Rick Burchett.




    A psychedelic Indian-styled story of Rudyard Kipling and the meeting of dream world and reality. Rudyard goes into a drug house in search of truth after a serious accident involving his assistant and collapses into a euphoric dream where he meets two characters and the psychedelic adventure unfolds.

    That, or the whole thing is a dream by a rejected lover who cuts his wrists and hallucinates ever closer to death.

    Or, it might all be real and Rudyard might have been a form that Soma Swami, the ultimate villain who tries to keep us all veiled in Maya, took to trick Rogan Gosh into destroying himself and he pre-incarnated as the two characters and all their adventures are real.

    The story is none of these things exclusively, but all of these things together. Dreams and reality are all happening together at the same time, one happening inside the other, creating each other.

    Peter Milligan and Brendan McCarthy are the perfect team to put this together. Wild, crazy and trippy but quite a unique experience.
    Last edited by hondobrode; 12-09-2012 at 08:33 PM.
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  6. #66
    Mark Brodersen hondobrode's Avatar
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    Sebastion O is that most charming of criminals; an intelligent lover of beauty almost completely devoid of moral sensibilities. He's a depraved seeker of pleasure who believes that crimes can be great fun - provided you're clad in the finest of garments while commiting them. He was sentenced to a long term in jail on slightly exaggerated charges of perversion and debauchery. In reality, he was set up by a "dear friend" whom Sebastion has now sworn to kill. Years later, he masterminded an escape from England's highest security prison. In doing so he left a remarkable trail of bloodshed - all done, naturally, with impeccable style.

    From Grant Morrison and Steve Yeowell.



    Orson is a man who has been genetically engineered by NASA to go to Mars and has a body tweaked to withstand the treacherous journey — he even has dreams involving the red planet. However, NASA doesn't exist anymore in this future and Orson is stranded on Earth where cities aren't exactly livable and where movie stars hold a reality-show competition for orphans around to world to compete to live with them.

    One of those children is kidnapped, and Orson stumbles into adventure.

    In the slums of a flooded urban wasteland, a little girl goes missing and ends up in the hands of Orson, a kindhearted but simple-minded outcast eking out a living by salvaging old machine parts. Recurring flashbacks reveal that Orson was one of a handful of Cro-Magnon men created by an abandoned government space program for the purpose of off-world labor. Soon Orson, who wants little or nothing to do with most society (and vice versa), finds himself at the center of a televised manhunt led by the morally bankrupt media, the girl’s dubious celebrity parents, criminal opportunists, and a ghost from Orson’s dark past.

    Brian Azzarello and Eduardo Risso construct a bleak and eerily believable near future brought to life by distinctive yet sometimes garbled dialogue and Risso’s stylish command of line and shadow.



    Starting off with a beautiful Paul Pope-adelic cover, the 80 page one-shot consists of 8 separate stories told in the Vertigo style with :

    "The White Room" by Talia Hershewe & Juan Bobillo

    "Case 21" by Selwyn Hinds & Denys Cowan

    "Postmodern Prometheus by Kevin Colden; "Ultra the Multi-Alien" by Jeff Lemire

    "Refuse" by Ross Campbell

    "Partners" by Peter Milligan & Sylvain Savoia

    "A 'True Tale' From Saucer Country" by Paul Cornell & Goran Sudzuka

    and "Spaceman" by Brian Azzarello & Eduardo Rizzo
    Last edited by hondobrode; 12-09-2012 at 09:17 PM.
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  7. #67
    Mark Brodersen hondobrode's Avatar
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    An assortment of unusual characters set in a future that writer Dean Motter calls "Antique Futurism", the world of tomorrow from yesterday's point of view. The Art Deco style that artist Michael Lark employs is a prominent part of the charm of this unique story which depicts hover cars with 1950's-style fins and robot desk clerks capable of independent thought in spite of whirring and clicking like obsolete machinery.

    Former daredevil-now-window-washer Cosmo Quinn

    Li'l Big Lil - albino gang boss

    the mysterious Lady in Red

    All just a few of the intriguing characters whose lives intersect at the formerly posh hotel, The Herculean Arms, in a town that is a living anachronism - Terminal City.



    There are several key themes to Testament. The story takes place simultaneously in the near future and the biblical past to illustrate the most prominent theme: that history repeats itself. This is done by juxtaposing the two timelines, the purpose of which seems to be to illustrate that religion is a continually evolving, living story that is being written by how people, and specifically the protagonists, live their daily lives. Other themes include increasing numbers of fascist governments, human rights, technology, and information economics in the form of a global currency, manna.

    In the near future grad student Jake Stern and his conscientious objector friends fight against the new RFID-based universal draft by attempting to access the collective unconscious through an experimental combination of the hallucinogenic preparation ayahuasca and shared sensory deprivation tank experiences. The near future story is mirrored through the history-repeats-itself idea as biblical narrative based on Torah, various Jewish and Christian apocrypha, and elements of other mythologies. One major departure from Judeo-Christian tradition in Testament is the separation of The One True God into two entities who in the story are represented by the God Elijah, who represents the Abrahamic One True God, and a new entity of the author's invention which he calls The One True God. Much of the action in the story is driven by situations and characters being manipulated by the various gods as they battle for dominion over existence.

    By Douglas Rushkoff & Liam Sharp



    A Prestige comic one-shot to celebrate the new Millennium (The year 2000). Taking the "totems" that were series that started in the DCU and later shifted to Vertigo, and setting them to have a New Years Party, hosted by John Constantine and all Hell breaks loose as they party like it's 1999 ! Swamp Thing, Shade the Changing Man, Animal Man, Brother Power, John Constantine, Phantom Stranger, Zatanna, Black Orchid and the Doom Patrol by Tom Peyer, Duncan Fegredo & Richard Case.
    Last edited by hondobrode; 12-09-2012 at 09:38 PM.
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  8. #68
    Mark Brodersen hondobrode's Avatar
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    The story centers around Sam, an obviously distressed homeless man, who wanders the streets of an unnamed city speaking mostly in odd quotes and sound bites. As he wanders, he has disturbing visions of events of injustice in American history (dealing with Indian Wars, slavery, the Civil Rights Movement, and others). Throughout his wanderings, he occasionally encounters a woman named Bea, and has conversations with Britannia. Eventually, Sam has a profoundly disillusioning vision of him participating in the bloody crushing of Shays' Rebellion.

    Eventually, he comes to the remains of the 1893 Columbian Exposition, where he sees Bea once more, now recognizing her as Columbia. She helps Sam gain a more nuanced perspective of his visions of America's negative moments of its history, such as how Shay's Rebellion prompted the writing of the Constitution of the United States to help create a more stable government. He has further encounters with Britannia, Marianne and the Russian Bear, before he confronts a dark, corrupt, overtly capitalist shadow version of himself. He eventually defeats this figure by accepting all its blows, recognizing and accepting his mistakes, and learning from them.

    Towards the end of the tale he thinks to himself: "It's a strange and frightening thing — to see yourself at your worst."

    In the end we see him again as a homeless man, but instead of wildly hallucinating, he's now chipper and optimistic with his traditional hat, ready to face the future.

    by Steve Darnall & Alex Ross



    Dr. Moses Lwanga is a philanthropic-minded doctor. Born in Uganda, his family fled to the United States when he was a child, escaping the rule of Idi Amin. A born pacifist, Moses excelled academically in America, eventually becoming a medical doctor. In 2000, Moses returned to Uganda to work with the disadvantaged people of his native land. There, he met his wife, Sera, a Christian doctor from the Ganda people. Moses and Sera work together to help the Acholi people of Northern Uganda, refugees caught in the middle of the Lord's Resistance Army insurgency in Acholiland. During the conclusion of the series, it is revealed that Moses Lwanga is in fact a replacement for the original Unknown Soldier, who tells him that the Unknown Soldier is more than just a figure, he is the very face of violence and conflict who must throw out morality and conscience in favor of becoming a force more than human to fight because war is an eternal reality. In the final issue, Lwanga infiltrates the camp of Joseph Kony, intending to kill him once and for all. He manages to plant his knife in Kony's eye, killing him, and all his subordinates and wives celebrate at his demise. Sera appears, telling Lwanga that no matter who he is, she always loved him, and the two embrace; however, this pleasant vision is a dream, and it is shown that Moses has actually been killed, shot in the head by a child soldier, a smile on his face from his dream. Sera remarries to a Muslim journalist several years later, the two have several children and live as a family. The story then cuts to Tumbura, Sudan in 2010, where several child soldiers are gearing up for combat. One of the children wraps his face in bandages like the Unknown Soldier.

    Moses is constantly haunted by dreams of him killing the people around him easily and brutally, including his wife. Disturbed by these nightmares, the violence surrounding the field hospital and his treatment of various injuries caused by the fighting strip away his deteriorating moral compass. As the series progresses, Moses continues struggling to do what is right, his two personalities constantly battling. While he wants to do good and protect the innocent from those who would seek to exploit and harm them, he cannot repress his violent thoughts upon seeing how low mankind can sink.

    by Joshua Dysart and art Alberto Ponticelli, Pat Masioni, Oscar Celestini, Josť Villarrubia, and Dave Johnson
    Last edited by hondobrode; 12-09-2012 at 09:47 PM.
    I am what I am and that's all what I am

  9. #69
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    I actually couldn't finish Animal Man, embarrassingly enough. I got to issue three or so and stopped reading; I have a very low tolerance for animal abuse, and I ended up just putting the comic down after the scene with the dogs and the cat...
    Definitely a good list, though, I agree completely.

  10. #70
    Elder Member Libaax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny P. Sartre View Post
    Take out Sandman and Invisibles add Sandman Mystery Theatre and House of Secrets.

    Also, for Shade, only from issues #1-50.
    Cool to see another one who doesnt forget the greatness of Sandman Mystery Theatre. My top 10 would be without ranking order:

    Hellblazer
    Sandman Mystery Theatre
    War Stories
    Scalped
    Human Target
    Unknown Soldier
    100 Bullets ( the first 4-6 volumes was real quality)
    V For Vendetta
    Animal Man
    Preacher( uneven but some stories was truly great)

    Not read:

    Sandman
    Swamp Thing
    The Invisibles
    Shade
    Pull List:
    The Walking Dead,Fatale,Near Death,Storm Dogs,Happy,BPRD,XO-Manowar
    American Vampire,Animal Man,Swamp Thing
    Daredevil, Winter Soldier,Indestructible Hulk

  11. #71
    Elder Member Libaax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ebullientsoul View Post
    I say this with affection, but without Scalped this list is out and out wrong.
    I agree completely and i enjoyed Y The Last Man work for its unique idea, woman only world but its not even the best BKV.
    Pull List:
    The Walking Dead,Fatale,Near Death,Storm Dogs,Happy,BPRD,XO-Manowar
    American Vampire,Animal Man,Swamp Thing
    Daredevil, Winter Soldier,Indestructible Hulk

  12. #72

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    My top 10 list would be:
    1. 100 Bullets
    2. Hellblazer
    3. The Sandman*
    4. Shade, the Changing Man*
    5. Transmetropolitan
    6. Scalped
    7. Sandman Mystery Theatre* (originally I would have had Moore's Swamp Thing but it was never under the Vertigo label so ;p)
    8. DMZ
    9. Unknown Soldier
    10. Lucifer

    *haven't read yet but I would assume that they'd take those spots
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  13. #73
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    With all this Vertigo love, I'm surprised there's been no mention of The Unwrittten. Great read!

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by themac View Post
    With all this Vertigo love, I'm surprised there's been no mention of The Unwrittten. Great read!
    Yeah, that's right. It's the best Vertigo title right now, in my opinion. I prefer it to American Vampire and Fables.

  15. #75

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    I love Scalped, but I wouldn't take any of the listed titles out for it. I'd sooner give a spot to already mentioned The Unwritten or Lucifer, or rather give Animal Man and Doom Patrol their own one (total cheat-mode by CBR :D )

    Sandman as the top spot is predictable, but at the same time if it wasn't we'd have people here complaining about it too no doubt.They should do a follow-up and like hondobrode did above, mention the less know gems in Vertigo history. Everybody basically already knows about the ones mentioned in the article. Some examples which I wouldn't put in the bestest ever top 10 in history, but which I could recommend fully:

    . Brubaker's Deadenders
    . Milligan's Human Target 4 issue mini series
    . Jason Hall's Trigger (died way too soon)
    . Delano's Outlaw Nation (ditto, omnibus available at Image now so maybe it doesn't count as Vertigo anymore :D )
    . Ennis' Unknown Soldier
    Last edited by Omega Key; 12-08-2012 at 06:08 AM.

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