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  1. #31
    Gevian gevdarg's Avatar
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    Amen about the revenue for publishers. The "digital dimes" revenue model for publishing doesn't make sense for any publisher who doesn't rely on advertising for revenue.

  2. #32
    Senior Member PretenderNX01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gevdarg View Post
    Newspaper and Magazine publishers have to follow the money, so digital is the smart move for them. We readers are the source of revenue for the comic book publisher and we don't prefer digital over print, yet. BTW, The Economist is making greater pushes into digital only because of reader surveys that indicate that 60% of their subscribers will come to prefer digital over print in the next year or so. We'll see.
    Well, we are all on an internet website and not writing letters to the editor of a magazine ;)

    I would say that while I agree the majority still read print over digital (I already said I read all print), the truth is that every industry has gone digital and those who bet against it are the ones who fail (I'm looking at you Kodak)

    http://venturebeat.com/2012/11/07/dc...cs-sales-2012/

    The company also produces a number of comics that are exclusively published as digital editions. For instance, its “digital first” comics on ComiXology are 20-page stories with artwork that’s presented from a horizontal landscape and cost $0.99. The titles typically tie-in to some of DC’s television properties, such as Smallville and spin-off books from the Batman Beyond cartoons (JLA Beyond, Superman Beyond). The digital first comics are less work-intensive per issue, but hold to a stringent weekly schedule, which Kanalz said is part of DC’s strategy to keep people coming back every six days rather than once a month.
    Read more at http://venturebeat.com/2012/11/07/dc...xyE3TJruE5d.99
    DC also releases its new comics with the same cover price as its print counterparts ($2.99-$3.99), but drops the price to $1.99 after a month.

    “We do see a list of sales when the prices (on older issues) drops, so it proves that people are cost cautious,” Kanalz said.
    Read more at http://venturebeat.com/2012/11/07/dc...xyE3TJruE5d.99
    I think eventually the model may go to whole digital comics first, then trades. Comics need not cost 2.99-3.99 each, if they don't have to share profits with physical stores. They could also cost less if advertising were more a part of the revenue, which could happen if the move to digital gets more momentum.

    Does anybody remember who had that pie chart breaking down where the money of a 2.99 comic goes?
    Edit: found what I was thinking of. It's for independent comic but it has some interesting points:
    http://www.jimzub.com/?p=1953

    Another thing that’s added to DC’s digital comic books sales success, according to Kanalz, are stories that gain a lot of attention from main stream media, such as Superman becoming romantically linked with Wonder Woman rather than Lois Lane or Clark Kent quitting his job as a reporter for Daily Planet to work for a news blog. Kanalz said Superman #13 (where Clark quits the newspaper) saw digital sales rise 52 percent compared to the average month.
    Read more at http://venturebeat.com/2012/11/07/dc...xyE3TJruE5d.99
    That's where digital has the advantage, it's always there and they never run out of copies. If they want to move up the release time a little earlier to take advantage pf the publicity, they're going to. People who prefer print will still come (assuming it hasn't sold out in stores)

    We, retailer and consumer alike, are telling the Top 5 how we want to consume this product. If they listen and institute the right business policies, this business will grow because there is a lot of pent-up demand.
    Your confusing your demands with everyone else's. You demand less titles per month while others demand titles that appeal to them. Not publishing something I'm interested in does not make me interested in something else ;)

    If anything the move to digital would open up more possibilities for more specialized demographics. There's no cost to printing, no revenue sharing with stores that don't cater to that demo and you can take advantage of press in specialized outlets.
    Last edited by PretenderNX01; 12-14-2012 at 12:14 AM.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by PretenderNX01 View Post
    I think eventually the model may go to whole digital comics first, then trades. Comics need not cost 2.99-3.99 each, if they don't have to share profits with physical stores. They could also cost less if advertising were more a part of the revenue, which could happen if the move to digital gets more momentum.

    Does anybody remember who had that pie chart breaking down where the money of a 2.99 comic goes?
    Edit: found what I was thinking of. It's for independent comic but it has some interesting points:
    http://www.jimzub.com/?p=1953
    Yeah, you kinda can't link to that piece and not ALSO link to Jim's chart on Digital sales:

    http://www.jimzub.com/?p=2066


    For your other thought: there really isn't any money whatsoever in circulation-based advertising, if there was, your digital comics would have ads in them this very second. PRINT comics barely have ads, and they have circulations of 8-to-10 times what digital comics do.

    Profits from digital is *entirely* "pocket money" at this stage, and no current comics publisher could possibly exist on digital-only sales; let alone drop prices substantially.

    -B

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