Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 33

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Mild-Mannered Reporter
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    28,870

    Default Tilting at Windmills - Dec 6, 2012

    This month, Brian Hibbs reflects on November's surprising news from DC Comics regarding its digital publication schedule and what it means for him - and the rest of the comics retail industry - moving forward.


    Full article here.

  2. #2
    Senior Member PretenderNX01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    1,531

    Default

    No business model can last forever unchanged. The Music industry had to evolve to allow single song downloads to combat piracy, in doing so a lot of independent stores died out. But if the Musical labels didn't change, they would have died out along with them.

    I don't want to be harsh, but if DC didn't step up their digital publishing and they go under- what have you got to retail?

    I personally prefer paper comics, I wait until Batman Beyond is collected into a comic. I may get to a point where I wait for trades.

    I never thought I could wait to read an issue because I wanted to go online right away and get by cyber-discussions going, but I find now my real life is getting busy and I do wait until the comics stack up. Sometimes I even wait to buy comics until I have enough to just buy a bunch from Midtown's website and make the shipping worth it. Everybody's got to save a buck.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    172

    Default

    The first thing I want to state is that those of you who think that this is about digital are, in fact, wrong -- this column is about being lying to over very specific promises when the circumstances of those promises have NOT changed, according to the very promise breaker themselves.

    Quote Originally Posted by PretenderNX01 View Post
    I don't want to be harsh, but if DC didn't step up their digital publishing and they go under- what have you got to retail?
    DC is in NO DANGER WHATSOEVER of "going under". Sales are up, and the lion's share of that is from PRINT.

    Quote Originally Posted by wishlish View Post
    Brian, I could be wrong, but I thought that the motivating factor for changing the digital release time was the fact that while Comixology was willing to wait until 10 am/2 pm/whatever time it was, the Nook, iTunes, and Kindle markets were not. Those markets are used to updating new media at the earlier time and were unwilling to change just for digital comics.
    DC had several options, the simplest of which is to say "digital comics are released on Thursday, 12:01 am, then" Instead they chose to throw print retailers under the bus.

    Quote Originally Posted by wishlish View Post
    As much as digital comics could hurt the print market, a digital market without Comixology might be even more harmful. After all, Comixology is the only company that's shown any willingness to partner with LCSs through digital stormfronts. If Comixology doesn't stay in business, then any chance an LCS has of grabbing any digital money goes to zero (unless you want to be creating a page of Amazon Associates links every Wednesday, and even then, I don't know if Amazon pays referral fees on digital sales, or if their referral fee is as good as Comixology).
    While I do know ONE retailer who says that their cut from CMX is reasonable money, I also know about 20 more guys who tell me that it is a meaningless sum generated for them. DC certainly has other potential options if their store is really DM retailers selling digital -- they could go with Diamond's plan, which is infinitely more favorable to the retailer. I can say as a user of Diamond Digital that I have FOUND MORE MONEY WALKING DOWN THE STREET than that generated in fiscal 2012 so far, but then I found a fifty dollar bill two weeks ago, and that doesn't happen very often.

    But, more importantly, if you don't see that the aggressive entry of Amazon, Microsoft, Apple and Google into the digital market ultimately dooms CMX to irrelevance, I'm not sure what to say. They will get their milkshake eaten.

    Quote Originally Posted by ZiggyFakeMcCoy View Post
    I just don't buy it. That there is one person that says, let alone 10% of a customer base, "I like print comics, but my store doesn't open till 9am. Even though I'm a human being and so I sleep at night, not waking up till 6 or 8am, I'm now gonna buy digital now that they're available in those one or two hours I'm awake before the store opens. Let's forget that fact that I'm probably not buying comics anyway because I obviously don't have a job since in that case I'd be doing that right now and getting my comics in the evening."
    I don't really understand people who go to midnight movies, either, but Thursday 12:01 AM screenings of films are often the best-attended screenings, because there are CLEARLY a number of people who want to be the FIRST person on their block to read a comic -- or to blog about it, even. More importantly, the people MOST LIKELY to
    do so is the "super user", the one who is the most fanatical fan who buys the most comics.

    The important thing to understand is that 10% of SALES do NOT come from 10% of the CUSTOMER BASE... it comes from the top ONE percent (or sometimes less)

    Quote Originally Posted by Gene Ha View Post
    Is there any way that we could shift New Comics Day to Tuesday? Heck, I remember when New Comics Day was Friday. Then it slowly shifted over time to Thursday, then Wednesday, and competitive forces would have shifted it Tuesday if Diamond's near monopoly powers hadn't stopped the drift.
    About a year ago the entire industry shifted to Day Early Delivery, and, at that time there was a lot of discussion about possibly moving NCD, but one major problem is that moving it forward was apparently impossible from the DC/Marvel side without giving up a week on Final Order Cut Off. And moving FOC has a series of other terrible ramifications from it. But whether this was *literally* "impossible", or just "uncomfortably inconvenient" is not exactly clear.

    One other problem with moving the times forward was that it made it harder to fix problems for people whose shipments went awry.

    Either way, I don't really know any retailer that wouldn't be amenable to discussing other release day options if those helped preserved release parity. As long as I have at least 24 hours to process the shipment, and we preserve FOC on non-returnable product, then we can release comics on the eighth day of the week, as far as I am concerned!

    I do want to note, however, that "media release day" is, in fact, TUESDAY, so 12:01 AM Wed is already "out of synch" with that.


    Quote Originally Posted by sleepyreader View Post
    t's your decision about which comics to stock...but I know that living in a city with at least 6 comic book shops, I paying attention to which shop has the most choices and the best discoverability of good comics, the best shopping experience...I stay away from the places that just care about filling subscription boxes and don't provide a full shopping experience....I suspect a lot of the reason I didn't become a die hard weds customer in the past was because of the low quality of the comic shop experience....

    Sure, clearly this is true -- but we're not talking about "discoverability" here, really -- we're talking about titles that really have no discernible audience that I am carrying *purely* from the misguided notion of being a "full line" store. Which has been a nuts idea for at least 10 years, probably more, but one on which I cut DC a much greater amount of slack due to a history of support for the DM. Without that support, there goes said slack.

    Ultimately, we're talking about 1s getting cut -- 1s that only sell in maybe a 50/50 chance. These are not critically acclaimed books, and, frankly, the room I save in racking those marginal titles will go to making MORE room for the GOOD/fringe comics. At the moment we're talking about going from a 4:2 racking ratio of Marvel & DC vs everyone to 3:3 -- but these 1s are from half to 20% of the total sales of those books in my store.

    Either way, I'll put my stocking and curatorship against any TWO stores in San Francisco.


    Quote Originally Posted by Schnitzy Pretzelpants View Post
    the New 52, 'cancel and plug with new title' system is in part a strategy to ensure that even if a title sinks in sales and is cancelled like the one you are hinting at, that Warner and DC have been able to renew/maintain their publication trademark on the said character or title.
    Here's the problem with this theory: you don't need to release monthly ongoing titles to play the trademark game.

    -B

  4. #4
    I Love Comics! wishlish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    783

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Hibbs View Post
    DC had several options, the simplest of which is to say "digital comics are released on Thursday, 12:01 am, then" Instead they chose to throw print retailers under the bus.

    While I do know ONE retailer who says that their cut from CMX is reasonable money, I also know about 20 more guys who tell me that it is a meaningless sum generated for them. DC certainly has other potential options if their store is really DM retailers selling digital -- they could go with Diamond's plan, which is infinitely more favorable to the retailer. I can say as a user of Diamond Digital that I have FOUND MORE MONEY WALKING DOWN THE STREET than that generated in fiscal 2012 so far, but then I found a fifty dollar bill two weeks ago, and that doesn't happen very often.

    But, more importantly, if you don't see that the aggressive entry of Amazon, Microsoft, Apple and Google into the digital market ultimately dooms CMX to irrelevance, I'm not sure what to say. They will get their milkshake eaten.
    My followup points (and thank you for answering these, BTW):

    1. Diamond might be more favorable to the retailer, but has it caught on with consumers? I tried the app and deleted it. As a digital customer, I'm already upset that there isn't a DRM-free option for most digital comics (and I support the DRM-free artists offering such options, like Sim and Bob Burden). I'm not about to use two solutions to get my comics.
    2. Are we sure DC would actually have the option to sell comics on Thursday? I realize they're a big fish and probably have more say over Comixology than, say, Bluewater, but it's possible their contract states that they must deliver content within a certain number of hours of print new release.
    3. As for 1 out of 20 making a cut on CMX...I'm failing to see how this is substantially different than, say, the one in 20 retailers that carry anything outside the Big Two. Those other twenty retailers probably are not highlighting the digital program in their stores with anything other than whatever stock promo material that CMX provides, and probably not even that. Or they tried it one week, didn't see that big pop, and said forget it, ignoring the marketplace shift.
    4. As for CMX getting their milkshake eaten...well, maybe. Certainly, there's no "little guy" in other online media sales, save for Netflix and Hulu (and those are backed by big money, and even those companies have rumblings every once in a while). But I think it's more likely- and I'll bet it's CMX's exit strategy- that they get bought by one of the Big Fish, instead. For some reason, none of the Big Fish have come up with a captivating digital comics experience through their platforms yet. I bought Wizzywig through iBooks. It's a great book, but the iBooks experience is terrible for GNs- incredibly slow at startup. And this is APPLE we're talking about. None of the non-CMX options for digital comics are as easy for the reader as CMX. At some point, one of them will decide it's worth the money to just buy CMX.
    5. Unless...and this would be a much bigger threat than day-and-date...the Big Two go to an all-you-can-eat model. Instead of trying to convince the diehards to spend $3-4 per book, why not offer up a program of, saying $15-20/week for all the books? I still think this is the real endgame, and I will actually predict that it'll be an eventual iPad-Marvel relationship because of the ties of the two companies (Disney and Apple, both having deep roots through Steve Jobs). I even think we'll see something like that next year; Marvel still hasn't released a Digital Comics Unlimited app for the iPad, but swear they're working on it. I'll give 50-50 odds that an all-you-can-eat option is in there...

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    172

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wishlish View Post
    1. Diamond might be more favorable to the retailer, but has it caught on with consumers? I tried the app and deleted it.
    Obviously, I have no way of knowing if people don't like the iVerse interface, or don't want to manage multiple solutions, or if they simply just aren't interested in digital comics as a mass -- what I do know is that I have an active and high profile comics review site, and we're doing direct links to books that are available on our store, and the level of sales is virtually nil. I could really promote it, do a bunch of stuff designed specifically to promote digital comics, and my sense is that sales will still probably be insignificant and not worth even the time to do.

    There's also Marvel's "bounceback" program, where they pay a small amount to retailers when customers redeem the digital codes -- YTD this has also been an utterly insignificant number. Free money, so that's fine, but nothing of any meaning or weight whatsoever.

    Quote Originally Posted by wishlish View Post
    2. Are we sure DC would actually have the option to sell comics on Thursday? I realize they're a big fish and probably have more say over Comixology than, say, Bluewater, but it's possible their contract states that they must deliver content within a certain number of hours of print new release.
    I've watched DC for 23 years, and I'm fairly sure that they would never ever sign anything remotely like that, kinda ever. They're Warner Bros, and their tradition for the last umpty years is having Most Favored Nation status at distributors.

    Quote Originally Posted by wishlish View Post
    3. As for 1 out of 20 making a cut on CMX...I'm failing to see how this is substantially different than, say, the one in 20 retailers that carry anything outside the Big Two. Those other twenty retailers probably are not highlighting the digital program in their stores with anything other than whatever stock promo material that CMX provides, and probably not even that. Or they tried it one week, didn't see that big pop, and said forget it, ignoring the marketplace shift.
    Most retailers I know are conscientious, hard-working, and try to maximize every opportunity that they are given. I don't assume poor-skill or ill-will on the part of the retail community because (although there are certainly some exceptions) that's a really really easy way to rapidly go out of business in a very difficult game.

    Quote Originally Posted by wishlish View Post
    4. As for CMX getting their milkshake eaten...well, maybe... At some point, one of them will decide it's worth the money to just buy CMX.
    Getting bought out, to me, is the same as losing the battle, YMMV.

    Quote Originally Posted by wishlish View Post
    5. Unless...and this would be a much bigger threat than day-and-date...the Big Two go to an all-you-can-eat model. Instead of trying to convince the diehards to spend $3-4 per book, why not offer up a program of, saying $15-20/week for all the books?
    OK.

    I don't think so, because I think that yields DRAMATICALLY lower revenue, and there's no way that you generate *brand new* readership with a weekly payment model like that.

    Also, those kinds of aggregate payment models are absolute hell on creator royalties.

    -B

  6. #6
    ... with the High Command Lemurion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Wentworth Hall, Tellus
    Posts
    2,433

    Default

    I can't speak for others, but for me iVerse/Diamond was a non-starter.

    As a user, the one thing that drives me to an app is unique content, and I don't see that on iVerse. In fact, quite the opposite, as they lack three premier publishers, including the two biggest. There's no benefit to me as a user from using iVerse; buying through a retailer's ComiXology storefront may help the retailer less than buying through Diamond/iVerse, but it's a better fit for my needs; especially since the Android iVerse app does not have a good rating.

    I'm still flabbergasted at the idea of pushing digital back a day to 12:01 AM Thursday (Pacific I assume). All that does is penalize and anger digital customers, and there's no evidence it would help print sales. Not every digital sale is a lost print sale.
    Anyone who thinks DC is bringing back the Silver Age doesn't know what the Silver Age is.

    There is no such word as "persay," it's per se, two words, from the Latin.

  7. #7
    Gevian gevdarg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Chicago. IL
    Posts
    2

    Default Digital is not a cost saving strategy

    "No business model can last forever unchanged. The Music industry had to evolve to allow single song downloads to combat piracy, in doing so a lot of independent stores died out. But if the Musical labels didn't change, they would have died out along with them."

    The thing about digital distribution for comics is that in the long run, it is not a good business model for comics. The only cost savings a publisher would enjoy is with paper and printing costs, which are interconnected. These savings can (and should) be achieved by (1) reducing the number of titles offered each month by the Top 5 (DC, Marvel, Image, IDW, and Dark Horse) and (2) higher print runs which will reduce the unit printing costs. Nearly every other cost savings advantage that would be enjoyed by digital comics is either already enjoyed by print distribution or it costs more with digital distribution. Let's talk returns and distribution.

    The Direct Market is already nonreturnable. Period. Unlike every other sector of the publishing industry, comic book publishing for at least the last 10 years has not had to deal with returns. People will cite this as an advantage of digital distribution. The comic book industry already enjoys this advantage. Distribution is where digital loses me when concerning comic book publishing. ComiXology is undeniably the leader in digital comic book distribution. Guess what? The distribution costs for a digital comic book are 65% of the cover price vs. 60% of the cover price for a print comic book, despite lower overhead. Let that sink in for a minute. With digital, you are eliminating the costs that would be required for a physical product because there is no physical product. With no physical product, there are no shipping, inventory, insurance costs, etc. There are no returns. And the distribution costs for a digital comic book are 5% more than a physical comic book. The industry hasn't simply created a digital Diamond, they've created something far worse.

    Then let's talk about the realities of pricing and consumer preference. First, "digital dimes" are not going to offset the losses from print revenue. No one, and I mean no one, thinks and no one is putting forth data that digital comics are going to move at $2.99 and $3.99 cover prices. These books are going to be 99 cents or $1.99 at best. So for essentially 35 cents in revenue, remember your art & editorial costs are going nowhere, you are going to need sell-through numbers that dwarf the current sell-in numbers of the Direct Market. And with DC particularly (and everyone else remaining mum) stating that digital sales are additive, going digital is going to cost comic book publishers a lot more revenue in the long run and the short run than if they threw some real support behind the Direct Market and print comics.

    Consumer preference is another matter altogether in that there is nothing officially or unofficially that suggests that comic book consumers prefer print over digital. Nothing. The Economist managed to double its circulation in recent years because they have a very specific demographic who derives a very a specific use from that publication. They do not operate under the same marketing conditions as their fellow newspaper and magazine publishers. The same goes for comic book publishers. Advertisers are moving their money to digital...so what? Comic books have never relied on advertising for revenue as a part of their business model. Newspaper and Magazine publishers have to follow the money, so digital is the smart move for them. We readers are the source of revenue for the comic book publisher and we don't prefer digital over print, yet. BTW, The Economist is making greater pushes into digital only because of reader surveys that indicate that 60% of their subscribers will come to prefer digital over print in the next year or so. We'll see.

    This is a short-sighted move, as always, by comic book publishers to undercut the Direct Market for the digital market. The same forces in play in other parts of the publishing industry are not in play in the comic book industry. The publishers are drawing the wrong assumptions and are making bad business policy as a result. Digital music shook out the way it did because for a 16 song album, we were getting overcharged $16.00 (the music companies had lower overhead with CDs than Vinyl, sound familar?) and the product increasingly sucked. When MP3s allowed consumers to go a la carte, Apple saw the writing on the wall and made the smart move because consumers had already indicated how they wanted to consume music. Apple now dominates because they read the tea leaves correctly and accurately. We, retailer and consumer alike, are telling the Top 5 how we want to consume this product. If they listen and institute the right business policies, this business will grow because there is a lot of pent-up demand. If they don't listen, kiss this industry good-bye because it will have betrayed its maturity and its inability to grow.

  8. #8
    Senior Member PretenderNX01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    1,531

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gevdarg View Post
    Newspaper and Magazine publishers have to follow the money, so digital is the smart move for them. We readers are the source of revenue for the comic book publisher and we don't prefer digital over print, yet. BTW, The Economist is making greater pushes into digital only because of reader surveys that indicate that 60% of their subscribers will come to prefer digital over print in the next year or so. We'll see.
    Well, we are all on an internet website and not writing letters to the editor of a magazine ;)

    I would say that while I agree the majority still read print over digital (I already said I read all print), the truth is that every industry has gone digital and those who bet against it are the ones who fail (I'm looking at you Kodak)

    http://venturebeat.com/2012/11/07/dc...cs-sales-2012/

    The company also produces a number of comics that are exclusively published as digital editions. For instance, its “digital first” comics on ComiXology are 20-page stories with artwork that’s presented from a horizontal landscape and cost $0.99. The titles typically tie-in to some of DC’s television properties, such as Smallville and spin-off books from the Batman Beyond cartoons (JLA Beyond, Superman Beyond). The digital first comics are less work-intensive per issue, but hold to a stringent weekly schedule, which Kanalz said is part of DC’s strategy to keep people coming back every six days rather than once a month.
    Read more at http://venturebeat.com/2012/11/07/dc...xyE3TJruE5d.99
    DC also releases its new comics with the same cover price as its print counterparts ($2.99-$3.99), but drops the price to $1.99 after a month.

    “We do see a list of sales when the prices (on older issues) drops, so it proves that people are cost cautious,” Kanalz said.
    Read more at http://venturebeat.com/2012/11/07/dc...xyE3TJruE5d.99
    I think eventually the model may go to whole digital comics first, then trades. Comics need not cost 2.99-3.99 each, if they don't have to share profits with physical stores. They could also cost less if advertising were more a part of the revenue, which could happen if the move to digital gets more momentum.

    Does anybody remember who had that pie chart breaking down where the money of a 2.99 comic goes?
    Edit: found what I was thinking of. It's for independent comic but it has some interesting points:
    http://www.jimzub.com/?p=1953

    Another thing that’s added to DC’s digital comic books sales success, according to Kanalz, are stories that gain a lot of attention from main stream media, such as Superman becoming romantically linked with Wonder Woman rather than Lois Lane or Clark Kent quitting his job as a reporter for Daily Planet to work for a news blog. Kanalz said Superman #13 (where Clark quits the newspaper) saw digital sales rise 52 percent compared to the average month.
    Read more at http://venturebeat.com/2012/11/07/dc...xyE3TJruE5d.99
    That's where digital has the advantage, it's always there and they never run out of copies. If they want to move up the release time a little earlier to take advantage pf the publicity, they're going to. People who prefer print will still come (assuming it hasn't sold out in stores)

    We, retailer and consumer alike, are telling the Top 5 how we want to consume this product. If they listen and institute the right business policies, this business will grow because there is a lot of pent-up demand.
    Your confusing your demands with everyone else's. You demand less titles per month while others demand titles that appeal to them. Not publishing something I'm interested in does not make me interested in something else ;)

    If anything the move to digital would open up more possibilities for more specialized demographics. There's no cost to printing, no revenue sharing with stores that don't cater to that demo and you can take advantage of press in specialized outlets.
    Last edited by PretenderNX01; 12-14-2012 at 12:14 AM.

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    172

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PretenderNX01 View Post
    I think eventually the model may go to whole digital comics first, then trades. Comics need not cost 2.99-3.99 each, if they don't have to share profits with physical stores. They could also cost less if advertising were more a part of the revenue, which could happen if the move to digital gets more momentum.

    Does anybody remember who had that pie chart breaking down where the money of a 2.99 comic goes?
    Edit: found what I was thinking of. It's for independent comic but it has some interesting points:
    http://www.jimzub.com/?p=1953
    Yeah, you kinda can't link to that piece and not ALSO link to Jim's chart on Digital sales:

    http://www.jimzub.com/?p=2066


    For your other thought: there really isn't any money whatsoever in circulation-based advertising, if there was, your digital comics would have ads in them this very second. PRINT comics barely have ads, and they have circulations of 8-to-10 times what digital comics do.

    Profits from digital is *entirely* "pocket money" at this stage, and no current comics publisher could possibly exist on digital-only sales; let alone drop prices substantially.

    -B

  10. #10
    I Love Comics! wishlish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    783

    Default

    Brian, I could be wrong, but I thought that the motivating factor for changing the digital release time was the fact that while Comixology was willing to wait until 10 am/2 pm/whatever time it was, the Nook, iTunes, and Kindle markets were not. Those markets are used to updating new media at the earlier time and were unwilling to change just for digital comics. That left Comixology (a pretty valuable player in the digital market) vulnerable. Let's face it, in that space, Comixology is the small company (at least compared to Amazon).

    As much as digital comics could hurt the print market, a digital market without Comixology might be even more harmful. After all, Comixology is the only company that's shown any willingness to partner with LCSs through digital stormfronts. If Comixology doesn't stay in business, then any chance an LCS has of grabbing any digital money goes to zero (unless you want to be creating a page of Amazon Associates links every Wednesday, and even then, I don't know if Amazon pays referral fees on digital sales, or if their referral fee is as good as Comixology).

    Or am I wrong?

  11. #11

    Default

    I just don't buy it. That there is one person that says, let alone 10% of a customer base, "I like print comics, but my store doesn't open till 9am. Even though I'm a human being and so I sleep at night, not waking up till 6 or 8am, I'm now gonna buy digital now that they're available in those one or two hours I'm awake before the store opens. Let's forget that fact that I'm probably not buying comics anyway because I obviously don't have a job since in that case I'd be doing that right now and getting my comics in the evening."

  12. #12
    Ben L FunkyGreenJerusalem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    12,020

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ZiggyFakeMcCoy View Post
    I just don't buy it. That there is one person that says, let alone 10% of a customer base, "I like print comics, but my store doesn't open till 9am. Even though I'm a human being and so I sleep at night, not waking up till 6 or 8am, I'm now gonna buy digital now that they're available in those one or two hours I'm awake before the store opens. Let's forget that fact that I'm probably not buying comics anyway because I obviously don't have a job since in that case I'd be doing that right now and getting my comics in the evening."
    Of course, in Australia and other countries that are ahead in time, our comic day is Thursday, with books being delivered to stores then, but now comics are popping up on digital sellers Wednesday morning/lunchtime.

    I think the publishers will be in for a shock in a year or two, especially if they manage to bust retail stores - pressure will mount/growth will stop, until they drop prices on digital issues. $3.99 for twenty pages doesn't compare to a 99c song or app. Then they'll have a short boom, and then realise there's less money coming in than ever before.
    Mind you Brian, didn't you say a short term collapse of the big two could be good for the market?
    Last edited by FunkyGreenJerusalem; 12-07-2012 at 03:05 PM.
    ADVERTISE HERE!

  13. #13
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    14

    Default

    I appreciated Brian's piece very much. Comic store owners are under terrific stress just trying to keep their business running, and it is not so profitable as well.... Another loss that we've had is the collector's market, which is now dominated by online sales. You don't get as much opportunity except for very rare stores in major cities to peruse a collection of Golden Age or Silver Age comics.

    I encourage fans to continue to see the added value in the paper product, and buy the better quality stuff.... Please help us retain our retail businesses, as there is a difference in having a music CD and owning a physical comic.

    It is fine for some fans to move to digital (especially new fans!), and I wish you all the best. I doubt that I will choose to continue with Marvel and DC and Image comics when that becomes the only choice.

  14. #14
    ... with the High Command Lemurion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Wentworth Hall, Tellus
    Posts
    2,433

    Default

    I mostly buy digital, though I do buy some print, mostly Marvel because $3.99 for digital only when a print buyer can get print+digital for the same price is a complete ripoff.

    I personally have a great deal of difficulty getting too worked up about the whole release time issue. Same day for print and digital makes sense, but artificial restrictions just serve to annoy people. I'm also confused by the apparent dichotomy between saying that print is better quality on the one hand, and worrying that putting digital on sale earlier at the same price will cannibalize sales to some great degree. All the evidence appears to say that digital is additive, and anything that gets more people reading comics is good in the long term. Besides, if print is truly that much better, digital buyers will migrate to print.

    (Personally, I don't think print singles are entirely better than digital. I dislike the ads and modern coloring looks better on a screen from my perspective.)

    Having said all that, I do not only buy my digital books through my LCS's ComiXology storefront, I also got him to get one. He runs a mostly games, secondarily comic shop and wanted some way to serve those people who already bought digital. (He's been in business just over 3 months).
    Anyone who thinks DC is bringing back the Silver Age doesn't know what the Silver Age is.

    There is no such word as "persay," it's per se, two words, from the Latin.

  15. #15
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Berwyn, IL
    Posts
    6

    Default

    From the CBR article, updated, this seems to be the nut of the problem:

    "In book, video and music channels, Tuesdays are traditionally when new releases go on sale, something that’s continued even as the number of retail chains has shrunk. The direct market, meanwhile, has held to Wednesday as New Comics Day, with Diamond Comic Distributors enforcing on-sale dates even as it’s offered Tuesday shipping."

    So most media is expected to release on Tuesday. Comic shops, working by Diamond enforced rules, have to release Wednesday.

    Is there any way that we could shift New Comics Day to Tuesday? Heck, I remember when New Comics Day was Friday. Then it slowly shifted over time to Thursday, then Wednesday, and competitive forces would have shifted it Tuesday if Diamond's near monopoly powers hadn't stopped the drift.

    What I'd really love is if we could change it back to Friday again, and then let the digital versions release on the following Tuesday. I miss Friday new comics. It was a great way to start the weekend. But there's a huge culture and infrastructure built around Wednesday new comics.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •