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  1. #16
    Professional Worrywort Kyer's Avatar
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    OMG....this thread has brought back memories of hassling my family members for a ride down to Long Beach California. There was a bookstore there called Sherlock's Home. It was made up to look like a room in a house, filled with mystery books. Between that and the large SF store some miles down the street that carried Doctor Who as well as Star Trek novelizations.....It was like visiting heaven for the day.

    Recall reading the Dracula and Dr. Jeckyll ones. Seven Percent Solution, naturally.

    Then family found religion and at the same time I got a job....

    *sigh*

    Never thought I'd say I missed the period where I was unemployed, but there were some good (book) times back then.

    Is there a list of all non-canonical Sherlock Holmes novels published in English?
    Daredevil-Waid, and Hawkeye. (Or was before received cost of cheapest Unaffordable Health Care. At least someone (government insurance companies and congress?) get to enjoy product of my working.

  2. #17
    Senior Member Vidocq's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyer View Post
    OMG....this thread has brought back memories of hassling my family members for a ride down to Long Beach California. There was a bookstore there called Sherlock's Home. It was made up to look like a room in a house, filled with mystery books. Between that and the large SF store some miles down the street that carried Doctor Who as well as Star Trek novelizations.....It was like visiting heaven for the day.

    Recall reading the Dracula and Dr. Jeckyll ones. Seven Percent Solution, naturally.

    Then family found religion and at the same time I got a job....

    *sigh*

    Never thought I'd say I missed the period where I was unemployed, but there were some good (book) times back then.

    Is there a list of all non-canonical Sherlock Holmes novels published in English?
    There are far to many to be listed. However, here are 176 of them.

    http://www.goodreads.com/list/show/1...ion_Pastiches_
    ...And does Mr. Goddanm Batman says so much as ''Thanks''? OF COURSE not. That'd hardly be GRIM AND GRITTY, would it?

    The jerk...

    -DKU's Jim Gordon.

  3. #18
    Here we ..... go DennyK's Avatar
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    I picked up a bunch of these books at a thrift store this weekend, starting out with John Gardner.

  4. #19
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    Strongly related to this topic is a series in which Holmes appeared at least once, though not as the star: Michael Kurland's revisionist Professor Moriarty series.

    I read just the first one, THE INFERNAL DEVICE, which I liked, and which was nominated for an Edgar award.

    Here's a loaded question: what's the first non-Doyle story to have him encounter something science-fictional or supernatural? I say "non-Doyle" since the "Creeping Man" story has a SF angle.

  5. #20
    Here we ..... go DennyK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gothos View Post
    Strongly related to this topic is a series in which Holmes appeared at least once, though not as the star: Michael Kurland's revisionist Professor Moriarty series.

    I read just the first one, THE INFERNAL DEVICE, which I liked, and which was nominated for an Edgar award.

    Here's a loaded question: what's the first non-Doyle story to have him encounter something science-fictional or supernatural? I say "non-Doyle" since the "Creeping Man" story has a SF angle.

    Have you read any of Gardner's Moriarty stories?

  6. #21
    On the Road Again Calamas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kizmet View Post
    Fred Saberhagen's Dracula series includes two encounters between his Dracula and Sherlock Holmes which are quite good.
    Crime writer Loren D. Estleman also wrote two in this vein (from the Holmes side): Sherlock Holmes vs. Dracula and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Holmes. I haven’t read the latter but enjoyed the Dracula effort. I thought he did an excellent job of mimicking Dr. Watson’s “voice.” Not surprising. A lifelong fan, he also wrote an admirable introduction to Sherlock Holmes: Complete Stories and Novels.
    Last edited by Calamas; 02-18-2013 at 05:13 PM.

  7. #22
    Here we ..... go DennyK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calamas View Post
    Crime writer Loren D. Estleman also wrote two in this vein (from the Holmes side): Sherlock Holmes vs. Dracula and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Holmes. I haven’t read the latter but enjoyed the Dracula effort. I thought he did an excellent job of mimicking Dr. Watson’s “voice.” Not surprising. A lifelong fan, he also wrote an admirable introduction to Sherlock Holmes: Complete Stories and Novels.

    I picked up both of those last weekend

  8. #23
    Elder Member dupersuper's Avatar
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    There's a Robert J. Sawyer short story in Iterations, various comics appearances, the 2 modern TV shows, episodes of Batman: The Brave and the Bold, Bravestar...
    Pull List; seems to be too long to fit in my sig...

  9. #24
    Senior Member Vidocq's Avatar
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    Are, Exploits of Sherlock Holmes, Andrew Lane's Young Sherlock Holmes and House of Silk canon to each other?

    I had a revelation brought by Insomnia. Think about it... they were all in some way commissioned by the Conan Doyle Estate as interquels or prequels of the same 9 Canonical books and they are lauded as ''official'' (at least in the case of House of Silk and probably with Exploits). It may be said that the Estate created a secondary Canon or a Deuterocanon (I'm fighting the impulse to go full geek and say EU). Not official if you don't want them to be but still concise with main canon.
    ...And does Mr. Goddanm Batman says so much as ''Thanks''? OF COURSE not. That'd hardly be GRIM AND GRITTY, would it?

    The jerk...

    -DKU's Jim Gordon.

  10. #25
    Senior Member Vidocq's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dupersuper View Post
    episodes of Batman: The Brave and the Bold
    Those were terrible. They played him like an obnoxious version Poirot.
    ...And does Mr. Goddanm Batman says so much as ''Thanks''? OF COURSE not. That'd hardly be GRIM AND GRITTY, would it?

    The jerk...

    -DKU's Jim Gordon.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vidocq View Post
    Well, The Seven Percent Solution is the only one considered a classic by the general public.

    There have been to ''Official'' sequels commissioned by ACD's heirs after his death: The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes by his son Adrian Conan Doyle and his friend and Biographer John Dickson Carr and The more recent House of Silk by Anthony Horowitz.

    Sherlock Holmes and the Murder at Lodore Falls by Charlotte Smith Has been getting a lot of praise. It's author also has a blog were she reviews Sherlock Holmes books that you might want to check http://sherlockian-book-reviews.tumblr.com/

    It's an OGN but The Painful Predicament of Alice Faulkner by Bret M Herholz doesn't get enough praise.
    Don't forget Michael Chabon's The Final Solution.

    Sandy Hausler

    EDIT: Kiroyoshi best me to it. Sorry.
    Last edited by Sandy Hausler; 06-28-2013 at 12:28 PM.

  12. #27
    Senior Member Vidocq's Avatar
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    Not really Fiction but do yourselves a favor and read Mastermind: How To Think Like Sherlock Holmes. It's the best book about Sherlock Holmes that i've read.

    I usually loath this ''How To... like Sherlock Holmes'' books but I decided to pick this one up after hearing that was written by a psychologist, like myself, writer of both Literaly Psyched and Lessons learned from Sherlock Holmes for Scientific American and had two amazing interviews for both the Bakerstreet Babes and I Hear Of Sherlock, the two of which I advised you give it a listen because her view on Holmes and Watson is very insightful.
    The book itself it's pretty awesome, it completely destroys the idea that Holmes' observational skills are a Super-power and shows exactly how a person could realistically develop this skills, though not as well as Holmes', (mostly because Holmes had a head start over everybody) and explains, with real science how you could actually become more observant, more analyitic and overall better at your chosen profession.

    I seriously hope one of you guys reads it because I've been dying to discuss it with people and no one around me has read it yet!
    ...And does Mr. Goddanm Batman says so much as ''Thanks''? OF COURSE not. That'd hardly be GRIM AND GRITTY, would it?

    The jerk...

    -DKU's Jim Gordon.

  13. #28
    On the Road Again Calamas's Avatar
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    If I can pick up where I left off seven post and some ten months ago, I finally found and read the other Loren D. Estleman novel mentioned above, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Holmes. While I didnít like it as much as Sherlock Holmes vs. Dracula, I still enjoyed it well enough. I think the difference between the two novels stems from the structure forced upon the author. You can pick up a confrontation with Dracula at just about any point that is convenient. Estleman had to fold the encounter with Jekyll and Hyde into the structure established by Stevenson. Tough to build suspense over the course of more than a year.

    Not that Iím complaining. As I said, I did enjoy the effort, and primarily because of something I mentioned above: Estlemanís ability to mimic Doyle. If not for the nature of the cases, I could read these books alongside the Holmes classics and not doubt (for the most part) that they were a part of the canon. On some level I had the sense I was reading an until-now unpublished original. (Which of course is the conceit of these books: recently-discovered manuscripts of Dr. John H. Watson.)

    My only real complaint is that on occasion Watson is made to appear a bungler. Considering how passionately Estleman railed against this type of characterization in his introduction to Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Stories and Novels, I have to wonder if it was editorially mandated. It was the only thing that did not ring true, speaking as a fan of both the Holmes and Estleman.

  14. #29
    So Say We All BaneofKings's Avatar
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    Anthony Horowitz's The House of Silk. Brilliant novel. Although if it's been mentioned already I apologize.
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    Top 5 Marvel: Daredevil, SSM, Avengers Undercover, ANFX, Black Widow | Top 5 DC: Green Arrow, ST, Batman, RL, Phantom Stranger

  15. #30
    On the Road Again Calamas's Avatar
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    Last week I was checking Amazon for the reviews on the book in my previous post. I found it funny that this awaited me this morning.

    (Edited for space and the links are not active.)


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