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  1. #61
    Senior Member Polar Bear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MonteMike72 View Post
    I thought that Aunt May came across as mean and cruel. Knowing all the time that Peter was Spider-Man? So that meant all of her previous actions were an act and a sham?
    Also Spider-Man with out Aunt May just doesn't work for me. More so than a Spider-Man married.
    Fair enough! Thanks for sharing.
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  2. #62
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    Wow! Reading this thread was a great way to wake up today. Many good memories... ROM, Micronauts, MoKF.

    Off the top of my head Fantastic Four 200 is great. 70s FF has its moments and this is certainly one. The finale of a nice 6 issue story.

    MoKF 50, 100 and 118 are all classics and I'll beat the drum of Gene Day 'til the end of my days. I think Gene Day's last issue was 120 though, a great issue featuring the return of Super Midnight Carter. Moench finished with a limp issue, #122. Regardless, with the exception of 120 MoKFs 119, 121-125 are a sorry end for one of the great titles of its era.

    How about Legion of SuperHeroes 300? A sequel to Shooter's Adult Legion story with some nice work by Cockrum and Sherman and one of the last issues Giffen drew before he started experimenting with his layouts.

    And Conan 115?

    And Power Man and Iron Fist 75 and 100?

    There are a lot of good ones! Thanks for the good memories!

  3. #63
    Junior Member The Duke's Avatar
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    Three favorites are Batman 400, Batman 300 and Captain America 300.

    My choices as the three worst, Batman 500, Batman 600 and Avengers 400 (The Crossing tripe)

    I didn't mind Amazing Spiderman 400 because I didn't know it was a fake-out.

    Something I've worked out from reading Batman for a very, very long time. For the first 4 100th anniversary issues (100, 200, 300, 400) Bruce Wayne was Batman and for the last 3 (500, 600, 700) Batman was either not Bruce Wayne (500 - Azrael/ Jean Paul Valley - Knightfall and 700 - Dick Grayson) or not acting as Bruce Wayne (600 - part of Fugitive.)

  4. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Duke View Post
    Something I've worked out from reading Batman for a very, very long time. For the first 4 100th anniversary issues (100, 200, 300, 400) Bruce Wayne was Batman and for the last 3 (500, 600, 700) Batman was either not Bruce Wayne (500 - Azrael/ Jean Paul Valley - Knightfall and 700 - Dick Grayson) or not acting as Bruce Wayne (600 - part of Fugitive.)
    700 has 4 chapters, 4 Batmen
    1. Bruce Wayne (Richard as Robin and Barbra as Batgirl)
    2. Richard Grayson (Damian as Robin)
    3. Damian Wayne (alone)
    4. Terry McGuiness (for the least part and Damian as his mentor)
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  5. #65

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    Another anniversary issue worth mentioning is Action Comics 544 (June 1983) which celebrated the 45th anniversary of the title (hm celebrating 45 years--did editor Schwartz already know he wouldn't be there to celebrate the 50th?), but as with most DC anniversary books this is neither the greatest nor the worst, rather a mix of good, bad, and indifferent.

    Good: The book featured major changes to Superman's two major villains--Lex Luthor and Brainiac.
    Good: The return of Murphy Anderson to inking Curt Swan on the Luthor story.
    Good: Gil Kane illustrating the Brainiac story.
    Good: The Luthor story features Lexor. I'm a big fan of Lexor and it was a shame that after Edmond Hamilton left Superman, Lexor was not revisited until this issue. It's a great concept that actually predates Victor von Doom's Latveria. And just how Luthor came to be Lexor's hero (and how the planet got that name) is the stuff of epic Superman legend.
    Good: Luthor's battle armour designed by George Perez--who has a spotlight page in this issue--seen for the first time. And the best thing about this is it's Lexorian technology. Lexor offered so many possibilities for how Luthor was able to develop such advanced weaponry.
    Good: Marv Wolfman writes the Brainiac story, and while he was never one of my favourite Superman writers he does build on this story in future issues which gives it an epic feel.
    Good: Jerry Siegel writes a three page text reflecting on his past achievements.
    Good: Joe Shuster offers a one page Superman pin-up.

    Bad: Lexor gets blowed up. Just as soon as we get the return of Lexor and all the juicy stuff about Luthor's personal life there--it's all gotten rid of.
    Bad: Brainiac gets a makeover. Bye bye lovable green-skinned android with those funny nodes on the head. And the pink pumpkin pants.
    Bad: No Koko. Where's our little space-monkey. I always loved that a freakin' android had a pet monkey to make him more human. And villains are always cooler when they're stroking their pet monkey while hatching a diabolical scheme.

    Indifferent: The new redesign for Brainiac--by Ed Hannigan with a special spotlight page--and very well executed in the story by Gil Kane--is kind of awesome, but it doesn't do a lot for me. I like that Brainiac can take different forms. Why he has to stick with this skeletal form isn't clear. It doesn't really compute that a sentient artificial life form would choose to imprison his consciousness in a clunky metal robot form, rather than a sleek and stylish android form. But it's nice that Brainiac can move his consciousness around.
    Indifferent: Cary Bates does an okay job writing the Luthor story, but one is always left to wonder what Edmond Hamilton could have done with the same material. The pathos of the Luthor character isn't really there like it was in some of Hamilton's stories.
    Indifferent: The destruction of Lexor does give Luthor a motivation to hate Superman and puts him on a more desperate course than he had been on before. And it does set up a parallel between the two figures--just as Superman lost his native world, Luthor has now lost his adoptive world. But it's rather forced--after 18 years, suddenly we find out that Luthor still has a very personal connection to Lexor, even though it's never been mentioned in all those years. And events are manipulated to make Luthor hate Superman, even though Superman is not really to blame.
    Indifferent: The cover by Gil Kane and Dick Giordano is a good effort, but it's rather tame when you consider what these two were capable of.

  6. #66
    Junior Member The Duke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aziz Abbasi View Post
    700 has 4 chapters, 4 Batmen
    1. Bruce Wayne (Richard as Robin and Barbra as Batgirl)
    2. Richard Grayson (Damian as Robin)
    3. Damian Wayne (alone)
    4. Terry McGuiness (for the least part and Damian as his mentor)
    That was a case of assuming facts not in evidence. I didn't make it that far in Batman. I went out with Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader.

  7. #67
    Senior Member Polar Bear's Avatar
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    Ear, excellent review of that issue of Action. I agree with just about everything you said.

    How often did Lexor appear before this story? Is there a list of appearances?
    Anyway, it is cool for you to acquire acrimony of crumbling time on blast this website.
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  8. #68
    Frugal fanboy Cei-U!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Polar Bear View Post
    Ear, excellent review of that issue of Action. I agree with just about everything you said.

    How often did Lexor appear before this story? Is there a list of appearances?
    Gotcha covered, PB! The Lexorians debuted in Superman #164 and therafter appeared in Superman #167-68 and Action #318-19, 332 and 365 before going extinct in Action 544. They also appeared in a computer simulation in World's Finest #238.

    EDIT: As EitF notes below, Ardora appears without her fellow Lexorians in Action #333 and 335.

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  9. #69
    Senior Member Polar Bear's Avatar
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    WOW! Answered with the speed of a thunderbolt!!

    Thank you!
    Anyway, it is cool for you to acquire acrimony of crumbling time on blast this website.
    --best spam ever

  10. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cei-U! View Post
    Gotcha covered, PB! The Lexorians debuted in Superman #164 and therafter appeared in Superman #167-68 and Action #318-19, 332 and 365 before going extinct in Action 544. They also appeared in a computer simulation in World's Finest #238.

    Cei-U!
    I summon the total waste of good characters!
    That's almost all of them as far as I know, except that the story in 332 was continued into 333 and then 335 (334 was an all-Supergirl Giant reprint issue). In 333 there's just one panel showing the beautiful Adora crying over Luthor, her bad boy lover. But 335 has more panels of flashback and a final scene with the two lovers reuniting on Lexor. That three-parter was written by Leo Dorfman, as was 365 which was part of the 5? (or maybe it's 6) part Virus X saga. The WF 238 Super Sons story was by Bob Haney, of course, and 544 by Bates as I said before--all the others (Superman 164, 167, 168 and Action 318 - 319) were by Edmond Hamilton.
    Last edited by An Ear In The Fireplace; 11-24-2012 at 09:17 AM.

  11. #71
    Veteran Member The Beast Of Yucca Flats's Avatar
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    Some favorites:

    Action Comics #700 (the end to "Fall Of Metropolis" an old favorite from childhood)
    Preacher #50 (a worthy sequel to "Texas & The Spaceman")
    Hitman #50 (the usual funnybook length; but this coda to "The Old Dog" is so great it didn't need extra pages)
    Batman #600 (a rather grim opener, but the back matter is gold)
    Action Comics #800 (neat look at the secret origin of 'Clark Kent: Journalist,' with a Murderer's Row of artists)
    Punisher MAX #50 ("Long Cold Dark" pt. 1; home to an interesting look at how Frank's life could have gone if his family had lived, a scene with Frank's thoughts on some of the eh, 'tools of his trade'-- which could have been dry or masturbatory, but is anything but-- and a supremely chilling cliffhanger)
    Wonder Woman #600 (yeah, more JMS and but very solid otherwise)
    Batman #700 ( loved the montage at the end)
    Action Comics #900 (aside from DC's most recent vain attempt to go 'hey, people still like Doomsday, right?' and Donner's contribution, not too shabby)
    Last edited by The Beast Of Yucca Flats; 11-24-2012 at 09:17 AM.

  12. #72
    Member Chad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by An Ear In The Fireplace View Post
    Indifferent: The destruction of Lexor does give Luthor a motivation to hate Superman and puts him on a more desperate course than he had been on before. And it does set up a parallel between the two figures--just as Superman lost his native world, Luthor has now lost his adoptive world. But it's rather forced--after 18 years, suddenly we find out that Luthor still has a very personal connection to Lexor, even though it's never been mentioned in all those years. And events are manipulated to make Luthor hate Superman, even though Superman is not really to blame.
    I read this tale for the first time about ten years ago and found myself re-reading and re-reading it in an attempt to figure out just what was going on with Luthor. Why was he sneaking out at night to terrorize the citizens of Lexor? When did he acquire such hatred for a people whom he once genuinely cared for? The first appearance of Lexor had long been my favorite Superman story and the evolution of Luthor's character in that piece explains why. Lexor reappeared a few issues later (incidentally behind a classic cover designed by Cary Bates who was then merely a teenage fan sending in cover ideas through the letter columns) in a sequence in which Luthor protects the planet from Brainiac's scheme to steal a device that is housed there. After that it disappeared off my radar (until now that is - Thanks Cei-U!) but upon reading Action 544 I realised that there had to be some crucial story I had missed, some tale in which Luthor's complete personality reversal and change in attitude towards Lexor would be explained, but...no. It seems that Bates simply needed Luthor to be evil for evil's sake and played upon the fact that most readers in 1983 would be unfamilar enough with Lexor to not realise that this was not how Luthor would behave on this world. The story really left me cold.

  13. #73
    Say WHAT?!?!?!? FanboyStranger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Duke View Post
    My choices as the three worst, Batman 500, Batman 600 and Avengers 400 (The Crossing tripe)
    Avengers 400 was actually post-Crossing. I didn't find it terrible, but it was a fairly mediocre story, especially since it was by Mark Waid and the late Mike Wieringo, two very reliable talents. It's a pretty good example of the kind of late '90s comic that felt it needed to touch upon an earlier seminal comic in the series, in this case updating the Loki plot in Avengers 1 for a new generation. Just blah all around (yet still better than the Crossing stuff that preceded it, the two Onslaught issues that followed, and the entirity of Heroes Reborn.)

  14. #74
    Member Chad's Avatar
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    Though I don't usually think of 25th/50th/75th issues as true Anniversary issues, DC Comics Presents 50 contains what has to be one of the greatest Superman stories of the Bronze Age. "When you wish upon a Planetoid" defines the importance of Superman's Clark Kent identity by simply removing it from the equation. In this story, Superman's momentary wish that he could separate his two selves is granted to the point where neither one is aware that they once shared the same identity. Able to now be Superman 24 hours a day, the man of steel becomes a much colder hero. For once, he openly acknowledges his distaste for the reckless stunts Lois Lane's pulls when chasing a story and the role she forces him to play in her life:

    Lois: Thanks for saving my life--again! Hope I haven't used up my quota yet?

    Superman: It's nothing to joke about! Your interference allowed the Atomic Skull to escape! Let me warn you, Miss Lane--someday if I'm forced to choose between life and property endangered by a super-villain and one reckless individual...that individual will have to be sacrificed!

    For his part, Clark Kent finds himself perplexed by the strange rituals he can no longer understand performing - sneaking off to the store room and pulling open his shirt for no apparent reason, for example. He has also become bolder to the point where he realises that he'll have to take on the responsibility of confronting Superman about his now distant and even borderline tyranical attitude towards the human race ("You earth people should feel lucky to have me at all" he tells one factory worker). Eventually, Kent is able to recall the fact that he and Superman, up until a few days ago, had been the same man. He confronts his other self in Smallville with this news and Superman is forced to accept that while Kent's tale must be true, he has no memory of ever being him.

    Superman: I recall your parents, Clark...vaguely--they seemed like very kind people. But the idea that they were my parents too...I'm sorry, it just doesn't register.

    Clark: Then I guess we'll have to resign ourselves to leading two separate lives from now on. If you don't mind, there's one thing I'd like to do before returning to Metropolis.

    Superman flies Clark to the Kent's gravesite where both men stand before Ma and Pa's graves.

    Clark: I've gotten over the guilt, I suppose...but the pain of losing them will never go away.

    Superman: The guilt?

    Clark: I tried everything I could think of as they lay dying--but nothing worked! I felt so helpless...knowing that with all my powers, I couldn't--

    Superman: --I couldn't save them.

    His memory restored the two men once again become one. It's a moving tale and truly explores the importance of Clark Kent rather than merely paying lip service to the concept that Kent plays a vital role in Superman's psyche.
    Last edited by Chad; 11-25-2012 at 01:29 PM.

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