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  1. #1
    Mild-Mannered Reporter
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    Default WHEN WE FIRST MET: The Many Loves of Peter Parker

    CSBG continues to spotlight comic book firsts by featuring the debuts of all of Peter Parker's famous love interests over the years, including Gwen Stacy, Mary Jane Watson, Carlie Cooper, Liz Allan, Betty Brant and more!



    Full article here.

  2. #2
    Comic Fanboy Spidey_Legend's Avatar
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    I read the article. I strongly disagree with the author when said that Gwen's real introduction is with John Romita. I think is an insult to Steve Ditko.

  3. #3
    Senior Member oldschool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spidey_Legend View Post
    I read the article. I strongly disagree with the author when said that Gwen's real introduction is with John Romita. I think is an insult to Steve Ditko.
    Well, Ditko certainly introduced Gwen but I guess the way I took that comment was that Romita drew her as a certifiable blonde bombshell and loved drawing her more curvaceously and in (then) modern fashions. Romita worked on romance comics and had a gift in drawing beautiful women (see his MJ too!) whereas Ditko drew Gwen as a bit more cold and not nearly as attractive.
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  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by oldschool View Post
    Well, Ditko certainly introduced Gwen but I guess the way I took that comment was that Romita drew her as a certifiable blonde bombshell and loved drawing her more curvaceously and in (then) modern fashions. Romita worked on romance comics and had a gift in drawing beautiful women (see his MJ too!) whereas Ditko drew Gwen as a bit more cold and not nearly as attractive.
    Exactly. When Spider-Man fans visualize Gwen Stacy or Mary Jane Watson, it's the way John Romita Sr. drew them that instantly pops into their heads. They may have been officially introduced when Steve Ditko was on the title, but Romita was the one that made them into the iconic supporting characters they are today.
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  5. #5
    Senior Member oldschool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stillanerd View Post
    Exactly. When Spider-Man fans visualize Gwen Stacy or Mary Jane Watson, it's the way John Romita Sr. drew them that instantly pops into their heads. They may have been officially introduced when Steve Ditko was on the title, but Romita was the one that made them into the iconic supporting characters they are today.
    And let's not forget that Ditko never actually drew MJ; she was only ever shown in a Ditko book with her face obscured by a plant or something. MJ was first shown to us in the classic splash page that ended ASM #42 by Romita in his 3rd issue on the title.
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  6. #6
    Like a boss E. Wilson's Avatar
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    Well, different strokes and all, but I like Steve's "Bitch-slappin'" Gwen over John's "Constantly-cryin'" Gwen any day. But I do have to concede that the latter is more iconic.

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    Quote Originally Posted by E. Wilson View Post
    Well, different strokes and all, but I like Steve's "Bitch-slappin'" Gwen over John's "Constantly-cryin'" Gwen any day. But I do have to concede that the latter is more iconic.
    I agree with you and I like Ditko's Gwen more than Romita's.

    However, I think that while Romita's images maybe be more iconic, it is actually the sweetened, dream girl personality that Gwen received posthumously which is the most iconic.

  8. #8
    Comic Fanboy Spidey_Legend's Avatar
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    You have to be cynical to critice someone crying. In fact, Gwen only cried twice. One when Peter dissapear when he was amnesiac and the second one after Captain Stacy's death.

  9. #9
    Veteran Member Leocomix's Avatar
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    The creation of a character isn't only the visual. MJ was first mentioned in ASM #15. #25 established she was beautiful but Peter thought she was ugly.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leocomix View Post
    The creation of a character isn't only the visual. MJ was first mentioned in ASM #15. #25 established she was beautiful but Peter thought she was ugly.
    No, Peter thought she was hot but he was to busy with spider-man stuff to care about her or gwen

  11. #11
    Member derekakadrock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randumbz View Post
    No, Peter thought she was hot but he was to busy with spider-man stuff to care about her or gwen
    No. He was dreading meeting her, thinking she was "probably a refugee from a horror movie," and kept putting it off for months until Aunt May finally dragged him into it in #42. Once he finally saw her, of course, he thought she was hot.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. Wilson View Post
    Well, different strokes and all, but I like Steve's "Bitch-slappin'" Gwen over John's "Constantly-cryin'" Gwen any day. But I do have to concede that the latter is more iconic.
    Well, the difference is that Ditko for the most part used Gwen as a Liz Mk. 2; she did not really become Peter's primary love interest until after Ditko left. Under Ditko, she did not care for Peter and thus had no reason to cry (especially as her father was also only brought in by Romita). Not that "constantly cryin'" is a fair description of Gwen. She worried about people she cared for, is that a crime?

    As for the thing about the "real introduction" by Romita: The Gwen people (both fans and in-story) tends to be the Lee/Romita one, Peter's first great love, and it was Lee and Romita who introduced her father and connections to England. The Lee/Ditko Gwen was more like Liz Allan or Marcy Kane and I doubt if she had remained in that kind of characterization she would be the much-loved, sometimes almost worshipped character she is today.

    John Romita clearly was better at drawing beautiful women and contemporary fashions than Steve Ditko, with the latter it was really a case of "tell, don't show". Mary Jane's face was hidden, but the way she was dressed by Ditko was really more appropriate to the 1950s (one of Romita's good ideas was to have her wear pants and a simple black top instead of a dress), and the way Ditko drew her she does not look as if she had been the beauty queen of Standard High (as per Harry's introduction in their debut appearance).
    Last edited by Menshevik; 11-15-2012 at 04:16 AM.

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