View Poll Results: Star Wars 7 director?

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  • Steven Spielberg (Friend of Lucas, has often come close to directing a SW)

    7 8.05%
  • George Lucas again

    3 3.45%
  • David Lynch (Almost directed ROTJ)

    0 0%
  • David Filoni (director of Clone Wars movie and series)

    3 3.45%
  • Christopher Nolan (The Dark Knight Trilogy)

    4 4.60%
  • Joss Whedon (Serenity, Avengers, various TV series)

    22 25.29%
  • J. J Abrams (Star Trek, Super 8, various TV series)

    13 14.94%
  • Frank Darabont (Almost directed TPM)

    0 0%
  • Kathleen Kennedy (Basically is co-chair of Lucasfilm)

    0 0%
  • Gendy Tartovsky (The original Clone Wars micro series, various TV series and Hotel Transylvania)

    4 4.60%
  • Brad Bird (Incredibles, Mission Impossible IV)

    14 16.09%
  • Francis Ford Copolla (Godfather trilogy & friend of Lucas)

    0 0%
  • Peter Jackson (Lord of the Rings trilogy)

    6 6.90%
  • Guillermo del Toro (Pan's Labyrynth, Hellboy)

    7 8.05%
  • others

    4 4.60%
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  1. #1981
    Elder Member Mat001's Avatar
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    But if the Jedi know that every birth can -and will- have wildly varying numbers of midichlorians, they are being derelict in their duty of checking every birth. They are guardians of the old republic, they are part of the system and they have the power to have suggestions made into law. Mandatory testing on every inhabited world would be the norm, and even in the Outer Rim terrotories -why would the Jedi limit themselves to serving only the Old Republic when virtually *every* creature in the universe has Force potential? Especially when they have a freaking prophecy saying there will come a Chosen One.
    There is no duty that says that they have to make it mandatory testing. That becomes conscription and that goes against the Jedi way, one of the very things that people accused the Jedi of doing on various message boards. The Jedi preferred to let those who wanted their children to be trained, to make the decision for themselves. If they said yes, then vunderbar. If not, then so be it and they moved on. They didn't go into the Outer Rim like that, because unless they were invited to, they had no reason to be there. The rules and boarders were set up long ago, long before the Jedi Order of the PT came into existence. Passage could be granted, but the Jedi tended to stay out. They had no authority out there. And as to the prophecy, they didn't believe in it. That's why there was doubt as to Anakin's being the Chosen One, when Qui-gon brings it up.

    He believed he could be a Jedi like his father, a guardian, a champion of good. Not that he had umpteen-thousand midichlorians in his system and that he was pre-approved for herodom.
    Luke knew by TESB that he was the Jedi's last hope for stopping the Sith. The Jedi knew that Luke and Leia could be the hope necessary, because of their father. The point of view for Luke is different from Obi-wan and Yoda in the films.

    And a name-change and exile can mask the already known midichlorians? If a Force user is "broadcasting" and that's how the Emperor can sense it, how come Obi-Wan managed to hide in plain sight? Yoda needed a negative-Force planet to hide, but Obi is fine in Anakin's homeworld, packing all the midichlorians he packs?
    Again, the Midichlorians aren't sensed. The disturbance that one generates through their presence in the Force is felt. But it is not always sensed by the others. Remember that Luke hid from his father for a whole year, without being felt while he was on Tatooine. Obi-wan went to Tatooine because Yoda wanted Luke raised by the Lars and they knew that Vader would not go there. And when in orbit twenty years later, he sends a detachment of troops planet side, instead of personally supervising the mission.

    It's an easier explanation that Obi stopped using the Force -or used too little to be of consequence- and that's how he managed to evade the two most powerful Sith actively hunting Jedi to extinction. You can turn off your belief, but you can't shut down the hardware.
    Sure, you can. That's been proven in the EU. Even the stuff that Lucas approves of, such as the cartoons, have that as well.

    But she was jam-packed with Force-manipulating midichlorians: a stray thought and the Emperor would have picked it up. But if she had no knowledge of the Force and no physical reason tying her to the ability, there is nothing that can give her away.
    Which she didn't. Leia didn't go to have her Jedi training yet. She was on her way to pick up Obi-wan, which is when she would probably have been trained. Leia doesn't divulge the location of the Rebel base because of the Force. That's why Vader is impressed by her resistance. He doesn't suspect Force ability, but he suspects that she has a very strong mind. Besides, Leia and her father were already under scrutiny to begin with due to the Alliance. That's why Vader says that he knows that she is connect to it.

    And George didn't think about this particular scenario when he came up with midichlorians. Just plum escaped his mind. No amount of explanation can save this one.
    Because it's not about the Midichlorians being felt. It's about the Force. The Force exists and can be felt by those who are able to make a connection to the Force and a particular tremor that results in that connection.

    Right, because there were no thousands of midichlorians in his system to give him away.
    No, because he didn't start using the Force until he was near Vader for him to feel it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Simbob4000
    I have to ask: How much do you love the prequels Mat001? Because you seem to have some kind of defense for ever bad and dumb thing in them.
    I love them as much as I do the OT and I've also defended the questionable stuff in those films as well. If I love a movie, good or bad, that's what matters. Why does it offend you that I do this?

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex
    I mean, im sure they would sell better by virtue of being at marvel, but these comics haven't exactly been lighting the world on fire.
    They've been Dark Horse's top selling licensed comics and the trades have done very well for themselves amongst fans.

  2. #1982
    Were You There? Michael P's Avatar
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    Let the word go forth from this time and place, gentlemen: If you criticize something, you're not really a fan.
    "If you can't say anything good about someone, sit right here by me." - Alice Roosevelt Longworth, on manners

    "It's not whether you win or lose, it's whether I win or lose." - Peter David, on life

  3. #1983
    Elder Member Mat001's Avatar
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    I never said that, nor implied it. I never bought into that "True fan" BS. You're a fan if you like something or only part of something.

  4. #1984
    Rargh! Alex's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mat001 View Post

    They've been Dark Horse's top selling licensed comics and the trades have done very well for themselves amongst fans.
    They are the most popular licensed comic from the...what, the comic company that is in 5th or 6th place?
    That could mean they sell like 10k copies, if not less.
    I'm just saying you have marvel put it out, hype it, and put a name writer on it, it probably does better. Not saying anything about quality, i don't think that has much to do with it.

  5. #1985
    Senior Member Vidocq's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael P View Post
    Let the word go forth from this time and place, gentlemen: If you criticize something, you're not really a fan.
    No, but some people seem to love Star Wars so much that they critique everything about the OT AND PT AND The Clone Wars AND The EU. Still buy everything Star Wars just to tear it apart. If George Lucas touched it, they hate it. The amount of Nit picking people do to Star Wars is ridiculous, it's impossible to like something once you've dissected every second of it.
    ...And does Mr. Goddanm Batman says so much as ''Thanks''? OF COURSE not. That'd hardly be GRIM AND GRITTY, would it?

    The jerk...

    -DKU's Jim Gordon.

  6. #1986
    BANNED Phil Clark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael P View Post
    Let the word go forth from this time and place, gentlemen: If you criticize something, you're not really a fan.
    That's not what I said. I said I didn't see how you could be a fan if you hated every aspect of something the way many here seem to do with Star Wars. Don't exaggerate in a lame attempt to prove a point. It don't work that way.

  7. #1987
    Rargh! Alex's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vidocq View Post
    No, but some people seem to love Star Wars so much that they critique everything about the OT AND PT AND The Clone Wars AND The EU. Still buy everything Star Wars just to tear it apart. If George Lucas touched it, they hate it. The amount of Nit picking people do to Star Wars is ridiculous, it's impossible to like something once you've dissected every second of it.
    Not true, i love the metal gear games, and they are a goddamn mess in many ways, but i still love them.

  8. #1988
    Elder Member Mat001's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex View Post
    They are the most popular licensed comic from the...what, the comic company that is in 5th or 6th place?
    That could mean they sell like 10k copies, if not less.
    I'm just saying you have marvel put it out, hype it, and put a name writer on it, it probably does better. Not saying anything about quality, i don't think that has much to do with it.
    Most people that have read the comics come for the characters and not the creators. The only really famous names was Howard Chaykin when he did the early comics and Alan Moore towards the end of the Marvel series. Most of the writers were either newcommers, or never became a superstar in the same sense. Chuck Dixon and Ron Marz were fairly well known, but aren't considered to be equal to Moore. I don't think putting Bendis is going to matter too much.

  9. #1989
    Rargh! Alex's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mat001 View Post
    Most people that have read the comics come for the characters and not the creators. The only really famous names was Howard Chaykin when he did the early comics and Alan Moore towards the end of the Marvel series. Most of the writers were either newcommers, or never became a superstar in the same sense. Chuck Dixon and Ron Marz were fairly well known, but aren't considered to be equal to Moore. I don't think putting Bendis is going to matter too much.
    Not as much as putting it at marvel would, but if they have JT Kraul or someone write it i bet it doesn't do as good.

  10. #1990
    Elder Member Mat001's Avatar
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    Chuck Dixon, Ron Marz and John Ostrander writing comics didn't have a huge impact in terms of sales. "Star Wars" fans might have their favorites, like Ostrander, but they're not dependent on the name of the creators. When Alan Moore's run was collected, it didn't sell high numbers like Moore's other work even with the hype from Dark Horse. It sold because it was another "Star Wars" book. When the Marvel series came out, sales didn't dip when big name creators left the title. Sales dipped when interest wanned after ROTJ.

  11. #1991
    Rargh! Alex's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mat001 View Post
    Chuck Dixon, Ron Marz and John Ostrander writing comics didn't have a huge impact in terms of sales. "Star Wars" fans might have their favorites, like Ostrander, but they're not dependent on the name of the creators. When Alan Moore's run was collected, it didn't sell high numbers like Moore's other work even with the hype from Dark Horse. It sold because it was another "Star Wars" book. When the Marvel series came out, sales didn't dip when big name creators left the title. Sales dipped when interest wanned after ROTJ.
    But if you have marvel publish it, and im talking about today not 20 years ago, and you put a guy who people will buy comics that he likes, like Bendis i beleive was the example you or someone else used, you can pull in Bendis fans, and then additional star wars fans because Marvel/Disney has a much wider reach than Darkhorse.
    As a comic reader, i never follow characters, i follow writers, i assume a lot of others do this.

  12. #1992
    Veteran Member Simbob4000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Clark View Post
    I don't understand how people can pick virtually all the films apart pointing out every little error and still consider themselves to be Star Wars fans. If you hate virtually every aspect of the series, then you are not a fan of the series. You are just a complainer masquerading as a fan. True fans forgive the flaws because the overall story strikes a chord in their souls.

    Me, I prefer to enjoy the films despite their flaws instead of tearing them apart to make myself feel superior in a "Look how good I am, I could do these films better than the guy who created them" kind of way.
    What the hell are you talking about? The Star Wars series isn't the three prequel films, just because you like Star Wars doesn't mean you have to eat up George Lucas' shit.

    The story of the prequels strikes a chord in your soul?

  13. #1993
    Observer Vibranium's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simbob4000 View Post
    What the hell are you talking about? The Star Wars series isn't the three prequel films, just because you like Star Wars doesn't mean you have to eat up George Lucas' shit.

    The story of the prequels strikes a chord in your soul?
    it may for some

    personally not for me, I only prefer parts of Eps 2 and 3
    Support your local roller derby league

  14. #1994
    Elder Member dupersuper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Clark View Post
    I don't understand how people can pick virtually all the films apart pointing out every little error and still consider themselves to be Star Wars fans.
    The same way I can make fun of Superman IV and still be a Superman fan. Just because you like a character/show/movie series/fictional universe doesn't mean you can't dislike bad stuff within.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mat001 View Post
    I love them as much as I do the OT
    Well...I suppose some one had to...

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Clark View Post
    That's not what I said. I said I didn't see how you could be a fan if you hated every aspect of something the way many here seem to do with Star Wars.
    The prequels are hardly "every aspect of Star Wars".
    Pull List; seems to be too long to fit in my sig...

  15. #1995
    Veteran Member Simbob4000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vibranium View Post
    it may for some

    personally not for me, I only prefer parts of Eps 2 and 3
    Oh yeah, that reminds me, anyone see a while back that Camille Paglia laughably called Revenge of the Sith the greatest movie of the past 30 years?

    Some stuff from her book:

    No one has closed the gap between art and technology more successfully than George Lucas. In his epochal six-film Star Wars saga, he fused ancient hero legends from East and West with futuristic science fiction and created characters who have entered the dream lives of millions.

    Lucas was the digital visionary who prophesied and helped shape a host of advances, such as computer-generated imagery; computerized film editing, sound mixing and virtual set design; high-definition cinematography; fiber-optic transmission of dailies; digital movie duplication and distribution; theater and home-entertainment stereo surround sound; and refinements in video-game graphics, interactivity, and music.

    Lucas called this fierce fight [at the climax of Sith] between Anakin Skywalker and his Jedi master Obi-Wan Kenobi “the turning point of the whole series.” Fire provides the sublime elemental poetry here, as water did on the storm-swept planet of Kamino in the prior film, Attack of the Clones. Lucas said he long had a mental color image of the Sith finale, “monochromatic in its red and blackness.” The seething reds and yellows of the great lava river and waterfalls (based on Niagara Falls) flood the eye. It is a vision of hell. As in Dante, there is an allegorical level: “I have the high ground,” declares Obi-Wan when he springs to the top of a black sandy slope. Hell, as in Marlow, Milton and Blake, is a psychological state – Anakin’s self-destructive surrender to possessive love and jealous hate.

    As the two men run and leap for their lives, girders, catwalks, and towers melt and collapse into the lava, demonstrating the fragility of civilization confronted with nature’s brute primal power. Lucas crosscuts to the delirious destruction on Coruscant of the Great Rotunda of the Galactic Senate, with its thousand round balconies in cool tonalities of grey and black. This twinned rumination of industrial and political architecture is an epic Romantic spectacle, like split parts of JMW Turner’s eyewitness painting of the burning of the British Houses of Parliament in 1834.

    The sound mix, overseen by Lucas, is unnerving; a tempest of roars, hisses, splutters, clangs and splashes goes shockingly blank and silent when Anakin’s arms and legs are severed midair.

    It's maybe the only vision of hell with happy faced robots flying around. It also makes me think of the movie Adaptation, the technology vs. horse bit.

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