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  1. #106
    S.P.E.C.T.R.E. destro's Avatar
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    Hey Scott, I'm curious if the letter columns reflect any fan confusion or resentment towards all of the abrupt status quo changes and editorial shakeups at all?
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  2. #107

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    Quote Originally Posted by destro View Post
    Hey Scott, I'm curious if the letter columns reflect any fan confusion or resentment towards all of the abrupt status quo changes and editorial shakeups at all?
    There have been a couple letters about this, but for the most part, not a lot. I haven't gotten this far yet, but there's a letter in #260 that is unintentionally funny. It starts off by complaining about the complete lack of stability in the book and then says, well, at least things will settle down now that Paul Levitz is taking over. And, of course, Levitz had already left by the time this letter was published.

    The same letter, as it happens, also pushes for the return of Steve Trevor, claiming that's he's one of those characters that makes the hero and the book more interesting, "like Iris West." This letter was printed at the same time as Flash #279, or in other words four issues after Iris was murdered, meaning it was written about the same time Flash #275 came out. Whoever this poor sap was, he was in for a bunch of very bad surprises all at once in his comics.
    Last edited by Scott Harris; 11-03-2012 at 10:39 PM.
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  3. #108

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    I wasn't THAT poor sap, but I was a poor sap. I hated all these deaths and cast changes going on. Little Arthur dead, Iris dead, Steve dead again, Batman dead (on Earth-Two)--and many more deaths to come. It became obvious to me very quickly that there was nothing powerful and dramatic in these stunts--they were just trying to shock us to bring some heat to the comics, which they wouldn't have needed to do if the comics were really good.

  4. #109

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    I've read some more lettercolumns and as the series gets into the 260's, there are more and more letters lamenting the constant shakeups. So it definitely is something the fans were aware of, even if it seems to have taken awhile for them to start getting more vocal about it.
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  5. #110

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    Wonder Woman #259
    Gerry Conway, Jose Delbo and Vince Colletta



    Synopsis: The first page proclaims this is the start of a three-part epic, so.. that's something different anyway. I think the last three-parter was way back at the start of the I-Ching era, everything since has been one or two issue stories. The 12 labors not included, as that was a theme rather than a continuing story.

    Anyway, Wonder Woman stops a plane from crashing. Meanwhile, an ad exec is surprised to be grabbed by Hermes and whisked away to Olympus. Even more surprising, Zeus is missing, so Mars has taken over Olympus and declared himself the new ruler. And now he wants to rule Earth, so he's decided to be smart about it by waging a new kind of war: A war of public opinion. Hence his need for a sleazy ad exec.

    Meanwhile, Diana meets her new neighbor, a talkative artsy guy named Lance who invites her to a party being thrown by himself and his roomate Tod. Diana says okay.

    Just then, Mars puts his plan into action, blowing up a building in Manhattan with a beam of energy. Wonder Woman shows up to investigate and as she does, hermes comes running out of nowhere and steals her bracelets. This, of course, sends her into an insane berserker rage. The people of New York are shocked and immediately turn on her, as the ad exec planned. Pahse two of the plan: Hercules shows up and fights Diana. Being enraged and mindless as she is, she just plows ahead in an attack of brute force and Hercules is able to defeat her. As a mysterious female figure watches, Hercules is acclaimed as the new hero of the people. To be continued!

    Notes: This actually starts out better than I was expecting. There is some promise here; I like Mars taking a different tack than his usual bull-headed plots and the whole ad campaign / public relations thing to discredit Wonder Woman and make Hercules and Mars look good is a nice twist. It feels smart and modern. Also: The cover has a subtle clue on it for Wonder Woman fans, as you'll note Diana does not have her bracelets on, which explains the "gone mad" part.

    I am also interested in Diana's new neighbors. A fey artsy guy named Lance who has a roommate named Tod seems on the surface to be setting up a gay couple as her neighbors, which would be catnip for most Wonder Woman fans nowadays from what i can tell of her fanbase. Not sure that was the case in the late 70's, but either way, it's potentially an interesting turn. And Diana does need some kind of supporting cast, because she's been totally floundering without any kind of life for her Diana Prince identity for basically 50+ issues now. Why even have a secret identity for Wonder Woman if you're not going to have any interesting stories come out of it? Maybe this effort will stick.

    Of course, given the creators behind this story, I am under no illusions that this will necessarily go anywhere good. And it's much easier to write a good beginning to a story than it is to write a good ending. But this first part wasn't bad at all.

    Also, in the lettercolumn they reveal that the JLA love interest for Diana was, in fact... Green Lantern, as I predicted. And it was for the reason that Ear advanced, because Jack C. harris was editing that book and writing Wonder Woman. But they ditched it, so, good. That would have sucked.

    My Grade: B+. but can Conway and company pay this off?
    Last edited by Scott Harris; 11-04-2012 at 06:51 PM.
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  6. #111

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    Wonder Woman #260
    Gerry Conway, Jose Delbo and Vince Colletta



    Synopsis: Wonder Woman is led to a special prison cell. Her guards and other prisoners taunt her, but she is silent, because she is fighting to control her berserker rage. Meanwhile, Hercules is getting all the glory, but he deflects it in order to introduce the true hero of the beach: Mars, who appears, looming over New York at abut a thousand feet tall. Needless to say, people are somewhat agog.

    Back in prison, Wonder Woman convinces a guard to take her handcuffs off; being the one guy sympathtic to her, he does, and she immediately clobbers him and breaks out of jail. Mars gets word of this from the city authorities, and he promises to ned her threat, but only if they televise it. Obviously, they agree, because that gets the ratings anyway, and mars takes a minute to reflect on how idiotic people are. Back on Olympus, Hermes explains to the confused ad agency guy that thanks to his plan, Mars is about to conquer the Earth.

    Chanigng back to her civilian identity, Diana goes to her apartment to try and use her thought projector to contact Hippolyta. However, she is intercepted by nosy neighbor Lance, who just keeps yapping at her no matter how much she tells him this is a bad time. Finally she throws him bodily out of her apartment, barely keeping herself from entering a berserker rage and really clobbering him. He's insulted, but she uses her thought projector to...

    ..do nothing, because Mars is blocking it. This breaks Diana's will and she goes into a rage again, but at the last second she stops herself, vowing that she will control herself and do what no other amazon has done -- maintain her sense of self even without her bracelets. The mysterious female figure fromt he end of last issue shows up and smiles while she watches this. To be continued!

    Notes: So far, so good. I am still enjoying this story, particularly the final development. One thing about the classic DC heroes (and to a lesser extent the very early Marvel heroes) is that they all seem to have these built it artificial weaknesses which basically serve as cheap plot devices for lazy writers. you know, Superman has Kryptonie, Green Lantern's powers don't work against yellow (or wood, whichever), Thor can't be without his hammer for 60 sec, etc. Wonder Woman, though, has like a dozen of these damn things, from losing her bracelets to being tied up to having her bracelets fused to who even knows what. I like that she has the willpower to overcome one of these restrictions and I hope that this change becomes permanent. It feels like a step in the right direction of shedding some of the more antiquated trappings of the character and genre.

    It's not all gravy. Like apparently all of Wonder Woman's villains, Mars looks really stupid. If you thought Galactus' original costume with the big G belt and the short sleeves was a bit silly, trust me, that's nothing compared to the completely goofy looking armored getup Mars is wearing, which is topped off by a giant metal letter M that covers his whole torso and shoulders. It's just terrible. Mars really should be one of Wonder woman's best villains, and he's the one who has shown up most often over the issues I have reviewed, but he just doesn't come across as nearly as menacing as he should because of a) his terrible design and b) the fact that he acts and talks like a meat-headed moron. The treatment of evil gods at Marvel in the pages of Thor is a hundred times better than this. Ares may not be subtle, but he's way subtler and more effective as a villain than Mars is.

    My Grade: B. C'mon, guys, don't screw up the ending of this. This could be the best story you've done yet (which is saying nothing) if you don't botch the ending.
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  7. #112

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    Wonder Woman #261
    Gerry Conway, Jose Delbo and Vince Colletta



    Synopsis: Mars is getting irritated waiting for Wonder Woman to show herself, and despite his earlier PR efforts, he begins to lose his cool. This takes the form of him smashing the Empire State Building and some other stuff. A city official comes out and tells him to knock it off, which just gets Mars angrier, so he tells the city what's really going on: He rules them and they only live at his whim. Presumably, they begin to regret being so hasty at welcoming him as their savior.

    Just them Diana jumps in her invisible plane and flies to paradise Island. Mars sense the takeoff and unleashes a pack of fiery hellhounds to track her and kill her. She manages to get them to snuff themselves out in the ocean and then proceeds to the island, where she finds that everyone has been turned into ghosts. However, this is just an illusion by the Duke of Deception. Diana knows this, because they msytery woman from the past couple issues shows up and it's Aphrodite. She returns Diana's bracelets and then explains the plot before taksing Diana with finding Zeus, who is at an other-dimensional conclave of elder gods. Diana flies off to find him and tell him of Mars' perfidy.

    Speaking of which, America has scrambled their fighters and some jets attack Mars, now that they have figured out he's a jerk. He swats them out of the sky and warns them if they don't pledge their obedience, he will destroy everything.

    Diana, meanwhile, arrives at the conclave of the gods, which is being watched over by some Celestial-sized guardian statues. They attack her and she takes them down using her lasso and leverage. Then she enters the conclave, only to find that Zeus and the others have left their bodies for the astral plane, where she cannot follow. However, Aphrodite's astral form tells Diana that she can instead grab something called the Gong of Justice and bring it back to Earth to set things right.

    Rushing back to Earth, she finds Mars on the verge of attacking America and destroying everything. before Mars can do more than say "hey, it's Wonder Woman," Diana bangs the gong three times, which a) somehow dispels Mars entirely b) causes everyone on Earth to forget any of it ever happened and c) restores everything that mars broke during his rampage. Diana then gives the gong back to Aphrodite. The End!

    Notes: Yep, they did it: They completely botched the ending. I find it hard to even imagine a more anti-climactic, deuz ex machina, arbitrary ending than this. Diana finds a magic gong, hits it, and everything goes back to normal. Wow. great read. It's like Conway realized he had run out of pages so he just slapped this crappy ending together to tie things off. It's horrible.

    The rest of the issue leading up to the ending wasn't bad, but honestly, the payoff was so terrible that it ruins the entire three-part series. You have all this set-up, with a thousand-foot tall Mars declaring war on Earth and Diana visiting the extra-dimensional conclave of the elder gods, and what do you do fomr there? Oh, hit this gong and the sotry ends. It's the magic Story-Ending Gong of Ultimate Copouts. What a huge letdown.

    The lettcolumn has someone asking for a Wonder Girl story and they reply that Wonder Girl only appears in Teen Titans for editorial reasons. I wonder what those reasons are, exactly? But (spoilers!) she does actually get a back-up story in Wonder Woman just a few issues after this, so something obviously changed. Also, there are more letters requesting a new Wonder Woman team-up comic, the Sensation Comics revival they hinted at a few issues earlier. This seems to be gaining momentum in the lettercolemn, but apparently nowhere else, as we know it never happened.

    My Grade: It was a solid B right up until the last two pages and that sucked so massively that I have to give this issue a D. Way to crap your pants yet again, Conway! God, can't someone step in and make sure these ideas actually get executed well?
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  8. #113

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    #261 marks 50 issues of reviews. So how has the series gone so far? Here's a look at the grades I've given the first 50 issues. I did retroactively change one grade, as the more I think about it the more I think I slightly overgraded the story in #248. So here's the new report card:

    212: B
    213: C+
    214: B-
    215: B
    216: B+
    217: B
    218: C+
    219: D
    220: B-
    221: A-
    222: B+
    223: D+
    224: B-
    225: C-
    226: B-
    227: B
    228: B/F-
    229: C-
    230: B+
    231: C
    232: B-
    233: C+
    234: C-
    235: C+
    236: C+
    237: B-
    238: C+
    239: B+
    240: D-
    241: B-
    242: F
    243: C
    244: B-
    245: C+
    246: A++
    247: B-
    248: B+
    249: B-
    250: A-
    251: A-
    252: C-
    253: C-
    254: C-
    255: B
    256: B-
    257: B-
    258: C
    259: B+
    260: B+
    261: D

    The breakdown:

    A+: 1
    A-: 3
    B+: 9
    B: 3
    B-: 12
    C+: 8
    C: 4
    C-: 5
    D+: 1
    D: 2
    D-: 1
    F: 1

    You'll note that 29 of the 50 issues graded between B- and C-. 16 issues did get a B or better, but the average grade still works out to be a B- or C+ for the whole run.

    Another interesting thing I noticed was that while I was hardly in love with the 12 labors, something some of you commented on, it actually graded out higher on average than any of the other runs I've reviewed so far. The Earth-2 series, on the other hand, graded out the worst, with the Jack C. Harris run bouncing between occasional unexpected highs (three issues getting A's of some kind) and frequent lows (an F, three consecutive C-, etc).

    Kurt warned me that the 12 Labors would be the best stories before the soft reboot that begins in #269 and sadly, he's exactly right. Even with the overall okayness of the 12 labors, what we have here is basically 50+ issues of absolute mediocrity, and I gather from what I've been told that it was as bad or worse in the transition issues from #204-211 after the end of the I-Ching era. Frankly, without the obvious boost in sales and interest caused by the TV show, I can't see how this series would have ever survived.
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  9. #114
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    I can almost guarantee I'll never duplicate this feat. But I suspect if I did my grades would be significantly lower than yours.

  10. #115

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Harris View Post
    Wonder Woman #260
    Gerry Conway, Jose Delbo and Vince Colletta


    ...Like apparently all of Wonder Woman's villains, Mars looks really stupid. If you thought Galactus' original costume with the big G belt and the short sleeves was a bit silly, trust me, that's nothing compared to the completely goofy looking armored getup Mars is wearing, which is topped off by a giant metal letter M that covers his whole torso and shoulders...
    It's a bit too much trouble for me to go through my boxes, but I believe this design originates from DC Special Series no. 9--the Dollar Comic Wonder Woman Spectacular. In that comic, not only was Mars redesigned but so were other gods like Aphrodite. If you think Mars was bad, you should see Aphrodite festooned with hearts. This is all down to Steve Ditko, who did a large part of the art on that Spectacular.

    This was STEVE DITKO, who everyone held in awe (and rightly so), so one must accept it as the work of a comic genius. One does expect loopy weirdness from Ditko--and he almost pulls it off. But by any other artist the designs were seriously dumb.

    That Spectacular was one of those "Earth-Two" stories, so by rights the Earth-One Wonder Woman was not beholden to that continuity (and we had already seen the gods in completely different designs). But my guess is that either DC had specially commissioned Ditko to redesign these characters and therefore they wanted to get their money's worth OR the fanboys at DC were so adoring of Ditko that they didn't see anything wrong with his redesigns and they really wanted to use them.

    I'm sure if Jose Delbo had a choice in the matter he would have preferred not to use those designs.

    At the same time, the Hercules we see in these issues is sporting the design he had in the Hercules Unbound (1975) series by Gerry Conway, Jose Luis Garcia Lopez, and Wally Wood (a series set in the near future, which ties in somewhat with the Atomic Knights, Kamandi, and Omac).

    EDIT: David Michelinie, Cary Bates, Walt Simonson, and Bob Layton worked on later issues of Hercules Unbound--and Walt added onto Herc's outfit with his own Simonsonian flourishes. But since Hercules in the Wonder Woman comic is an earlier version of himself, it makes sense for him to have the Gacia Lopez outfit and not the Simonson.
    Last edited by An Ear In The Fireplace; 11-04-2012 at 08:43 PM.

  11. #116

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    Well, I do sometimes feel like I might be grading a bit on a curve here. The sad fact is that I have yet to read any pre-crisis DC superhero story that can match up to Marvel's best. So I may be subconsciously grading these on a DC scale instead of a straight-up scale. There's some fun stuff at DC, don't get me wrong, but the stories just don't have the epic feel of, say, the Thomas Avengers or something.

    Not that everything was wine and roses, but during the period I've been reviewing, Marvel was putting out stuff like the Korvac Saga in Avengers and the Byrne/Claremont X-Men. Heck, just during the time frame of the last couple issue I've reviewed, Marvel put out the Demon in a Bottle story in Iron Man #128 and the first issues of Frank Miller's Daredevil.

    There's just no good reason why these issues of Wonder Woman should be this bad -- or boring -- when there was so much classic, great stuff being produced at the same time. It's a shame.

    I think I may start listing other notable comics that came out the same month as these issues so you can what you likely would have been buying instead at the time.
    Last edited by Scott Harris; 11-04-2012 at 08:44 PM.
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  12. #117

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    Quote Originally Posted by An Ear In The Fireplace View Post
    It's a bit too much trouble for me to go through my boxes, but I believe this design originates from DC Special Series no. 9--the Dollar Comic Wonder Woman Spectacular. In that comic, not only was Mars redesigned but so were other gods like Aphrodite. If you think Mars was bad, you should see Aphrodite festooned with hearts. This is all down to Steve Ditko, who did a large part of the art on that Spectacular.

    This was STEVE DITKO, who everyone held in awe (and rightly so), so one must accept it as the work of a comic genius. One does expect loopy weirdness from Ditko--and he almost pulls it off. But by any other artist the designs were seriously dumb.

    That Spectacular was one of those "Earth-Two" stories, so by rights the Earth-One Wonder Woman was not beholden to that continuity (and we had already seen the gods in completely different designs). But my guess is that either DC had specially commissioned Ditko to redesign these characters and therefore they wanted to get their money's worth OR the fanboys at DC were so adoring of Ditko that they didn't see anything wrong with his redesigns and they really wanted to use them.

    I'm sure if Jose Delbo had a choice in the matter he would have preferred not to use those designs.

    At the same time, the Hercules we see in these issues is sporting the design he had in the Hercules Unbound (1975) series by Gerry Conway, Jose Luis Garcia Lopez, and Wally Wood (a series set in the near future, which ties in somewhat with the Atomic Knights, Kamandi, and Omac).
    That makes sense. In the lettercolumn, someone did write it about Aphrodite's design, saying it looked silly when Ditko wasn't drawing it, so I had a feeling he must have been involved somehow.

    Someone also wrote in asking about Hercules in these issues and how he could be there when in Hercules Unbound he's supposedly bound during this time period, until 1986. They answered that they really didn't know and would someone please write in with an explanation? They didn't actually offer a No-Prize, but they might as well have.
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  13. #118

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    Wonder Woman #262
    Gerry Conway, Jose Delbo and Vince Colletta



    Synopsis: Wonder Woman runs into some gang members accosting an older couple and she kicks their ass.

    Meanwhile, Bushmaster is killing a bunch of animals using clubs and spears and other traditional African weapons. He's ditched most of his Liefeld-esque costume except for the cybernetic eye, which he shoots a laser out of here to kill a lion. This proves to his mysterious boss, who is called the Prime Planner, that he's ready to go up against Wonder Woman again.

    Diana, for her part, is invited again to go to a party at Lance and Tod's apartment, which she was first invited to several issues ago. Apparently Lance has gotten over her throwing him ass over teakettle. It turns out that he and Tod are not, in fact, a gay couple despite being metrosexual roommates named Lance and Tod, and Diana instaly hits it off with Tod, "talking for hours" before making out with him. Then she abruptly thinks of Steve Trevor and tells Tod to take a hike. Women, amirite?

    At this juncture, she learns the Bushmaster has appeared at the U.N. and covered it in a giant net. So she rushes to fight him and learns that it's a trap: If he is defeated, the next will automatically constrict and destroy the building with everyone inside. She also learns that his "primitive" weapons and all rigged with electronics and sonic waves and whatever. Despite this, she kicks his butt, then saves the U.N. using the invisible jet, which I have to say pretty much bails her ass out every single issue. The End!

    Notes: The cover, with it's multiple comments about the gang members being "warriors," is an obvious refernce to the hit gang film "The Warriors," which had just blown up huge earlier in 1979. It also has absolutely nothing to do with this story, as the brief gang scene is just tacked on with no purpose whatseover. Completely lame and pointless, though at least they got Dick Giordano to draw the cover.

    I don't know why they decided to ditch Bushmaster's techno-costume, but it was a bad idea, because instead they go with the stereotypical noble savage / jungle warrior thing which is borderline offensive. I liked him better when he was covered in pouches and shooting energy beams out the wazoo. he claims that his clubs and spears will work better than his old weapons, which, what? He could mind-control everyone in New York! How does a club work better than that?

    Bushmaster does mention that he is one of the five deadliest assassins in the world, which seems like an unusually precise number. Combined with the reveal of his boss's name finally (The Prime Planner), it seems as if this simmering subplot is finally going to go somewhere, Of course, we've thought that before of other subplots and been totally wrong, but hey fingers crossed.

    The lettercolumn has a letter where someone asks why Bushmaster is working for U.N. security. They explain that he isn't. But really, I thought he was as well, because he stole Diana Prince's file in his last appearance and then in the next issue, a U.N. security guy had her file and was investigating her. I totally thought these were connected as well, but apparently they are just a) a coincidence and b) sloppy writing.

    My Grade: C-. Hated Tod, hated the new savage Bushmaster, hated the pointless "Warriors" opening sequence. Only good thing is moving the subplot along.

    Other, better comics you could have bought off the stands this month: Avengers #190 (cool Byrne and Michelinie story), Iron Man #129 (Demon in a Bottle continues), ROM #1
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  14. #119

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    I would personally probably give a few of these comics a higher mark, just because I have fond memories of them. And I was really pulling for this comic. So every time I saw them doing something right, it felt like a major victory. On the other hand, there are some issues I would give a lower mark, because I really felt depressed by some of the moves they made and took them to heart. So it all evens out in the end.

    I did get more interested in Marvel as the 70s wore on. And now if I pick up a Marvel comic from those days, I can appreciate it. But back in the day, I checked out different Marvel titles on a fairly regular basis--just to see if I was missing anything--and most of the time I couldn't get into those comics. There was just too much stuff going on in the comics that I couldn't understand. It was hard to jump into the middle of that. And some comics were really awful--because they were trying to be so hip and full of themselves.

    So I think it cuts both ways.

    In Greek myth, Hercules was half-god, half-mortal. When Hercules dies, the mortal half of him goes to the land of the shades, and the godly side of him goes to live with the Olympians. At least I believe that's how some of the Greek stories tell it (Greek myth is a lot like DC continuity--multiple choice). So I would explain that the mortal side of Herc is bound, while the godly side of him is free. I suppose at some point the godly side of him rejoined his mortal side in bondage, just before the events of Hercules Unbound.

  15. #120

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    Wonder Woman #263
    Gerry Conway, Jose Delbo and Vince Colletta



    Synopsis: Wonder Woman brings Bushmaster to a hospital. He apparently used a capsule in a fake toth to ingest a drug that completely wiped his memory, so he can't tell her anything about his bosses or the other four deadly assassins. Bummer.

    Meanwhile, the Prime Planner contacts assassin number two, a amazingly goofy South American cowboy (or gaucho in Spanish) who calls himself, you guessed it, Gaucho. He rides a robot horse that can fly and he has energy pistols. He's also a sexist jerk. He blows up some fools and Prime Planner decides to send him to Washington to kill their next target, some senator.

    Back at the U.N., Diana is offered a job by the same lady who offered her a job like 6 issues ago -- a job which I would have sworn she had already accepted. If she hadn't, what the hell is she doing at the U.N. for the last few issues/ She's clearly not working in her old job, because she told off Morgan Tracy both when she quit and when she returned. I'm confused.

    Anyway, the U.N. security guy that has been investigating her for what seems like a friggin eternity now finally shows up to say that he's check out her file and none of it makes any sense, it's all a pack of lies and if she wants this new job she needs to clear it all up. Diana tells him to go screw, then rushes to Washington D.C. to find out just what the government files say about Wonder Woman. Good question!

    As she arrives, so does Gaucho. He blows up some F-16's, then swoops in to kill his target, only Diana intercepts him. They fight and in a bit of role-reversal, he lassos her with his own electrified lasso. To be continued!

    Notes: Let's start off with the good stuff for a change. I like the subplot of the U.N. inspector finally getting somewhere. The fact that Diana's file is bogus makes sense, so I like where that is going, causing her complications. I also like her desire to discover just what the government files say about her as well. it's a good question. There's one panel in D.C. where she tries to find out and the government says she can't get access to her own file without a court order, which really irritates her. I'm interested to see where they are going with this, because it seems like it has potential.

    On the other hand, Gaucho is yet another absolutely stupid villain. And since he's one of the five deadliest assassins in the world, I can only assume the other three are also offensively ridiculous cultural stereotypes. First we have the African tribesman Bushmaster with his electrified war club and now we have the sexist latino cowboy with his terrible costume, energy pistols and robot horse. Why can't anybody associated with this comic create a villain that doesn't royally suck?!

    The lettercolumn has more letters pushing for the creation of a Sensation Comics team-up book. No doubt hoping guest-stars could bring their cool rogue's galleries with them.

    My Grade: C-. I am being generous. But this is another case where the actual plot isn't that bad, it's just ruined by the horrible characters they populated it with.

    Other, better comics you could have bought off the stands this month instead: Amazing Spider-Man #200, Avengers #191, Captain America #241 (with Punisher appearance), Legion of Super-Heroes #259 (first issue), Spectacular Spider-Man #38 (Morbius!) and X-Men #129 (first appearance of Kitty Pryde and Emma Frost)
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