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  1. #46
    *choke* Dan B. in the Underworld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prince hal View Post
    Comics, not oysters.
    The fact that you didn't address Stolys (Stolies?) there is ... suggestive.
    I tend to split superhero comics fans into "People who like Krypto" and "People who don't like Krypto."
    Basically, if you miss the wonder of a dog flying around in a little Superman cape, you're in the wrong hobby.

    -- Reptisaurus!

  2. #47
    Senior Member prince hal's Avatar
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    I don't collect Stolies, Stolys, or Stolyla; I just imbibe them. Around here they don't last as long as comics. :)

  3. #48
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dupersuper View Post
    For getting me hooked on comics every Wednesday? Triangle era Superman comics of the late 80s/early 90s.
    Ah, I miss those days!

  4. #49
    Senior Member edhopper's Avatar
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    While I read comics here and there in the 60s, this was the one that started me as a collector and avid reader.


  5. #50
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    It's hard to pin it down after all this time, but looking back at the Mike's Amazing World site, there seemed to be a bunch or Marvel comics on the shelves in the middle of 1968 that I remember leaving a deep and lasting impression. In particular: Doctor Strange #171 and Thor #157. I'd read comics before then but it seems that it was round this time that I started to get more involved with them. Mind you, I was only 6 years old at the time, so it wasn't as if I started reading all these series regularly. Around the same time, I remember being very taken with the FF and the Avengers as well, but in those cases I don't recall a particular single issue that sparked my interest.

  6. #51

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    Grant Morrison's X-Men run in the early 2000s and Conan The Barbarian/King Conan made me really like comic books I bought The Phantom before X-Men and Conan, but didn't really collect until Conan and I still read Conan and X-Men 10 years later

  7. #52
    I say thee nay! icctrombone's Avatar
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    These three are implanted in my early conscienceness.









    The Avengers and the Fantastic Four have kept me a comic fan ever since.
    Life is what you make it.

  8. #53
    FF purist-snob
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    This:



    led to this:



    and ended up like this (not actual picture)"

    "Cant say it better than CaptCleghorn." - RolandJP

  9. #54
    More human than human. Johnny P. Sartre's Avatar
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    Back in the day I used to smoke Saga of Swamp, snort Astro Boy and inject Akira.
    The 9th Blog
    A Blog made with friends about comics, the 9th art
    Tumblr: Comics! Comics! Comics! ACK!

  10. #55
    *choke* Dan B. in the Underworld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptCleghorn View Post
    A/k/a the only issue of FF I bought during my first comics go-round from '67-70 or so. (My quasi-familiarity with the characters stemmed mainly from reprints in the occasional issue of Marvel Collectors Item Classic I picked up. (I've had my copy #22 -- the final issue before the renaming to Marvel's Greatest Comics, & of course long since coverless, of course -- in my possession for most of my life, I guess.) And of course their guise as "The Fantastical Four" in Not Brand Echh.
    Last edited by Dan B. in the Underworld; 05-06-2012 at 07:55 PM.
    I tend to split superhero comics fans into "People who like Krypto" and "People who don't like Krypto."
    Basically, if you miss the wonder of a dog flying around in a little Superman cape, you're in the wrong hobby.

    -- Reptisaurus!

  11. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by icctrombone View Post
    These three are implanted in my early conscienceness.








    The Avengers and the Fantastic Four have kept me a comic fan ever since.
    I remember getting those two FF comics as well, though not the Marvel Superheroes one. Looking at the GCD gallery, I think I went up to around FF #113 before leaving the series for a few years. Came back later in the 70s for tail end of the Thomas/Buckler era and kept it up through the Marv Wolfman run, though my heart wasn't really in it. No one's ever been able to recapture the excitement of the Kirby era FF for me, although there certainly were some quite decent issues here and there.

    Another FF reprint released around that time and that made a big impression on me was King Size FF Annual #8, which reprinted KSFF #1, according to GCD. I recall being fascinated with the diagram of the Baxter Bldg at the back of the comic.

    Quote Originally Posted by dan bailey View Post
    A/k/a the only issue of FF I bought during my first comics go-round from '67-70 or so. (My quasi-familiarity with the characters stemmed mainly from reprints in the occasional issue of Marvel Collectors Item Classic I picked up. (I've had my copy #22 -- the final issue before the renaming to Marvel's Greatest Comics, & of course long since coverless, of course -- in my possession for most of my life, I guess.) And of course their guise as "The Fantastical Four" in Not Brand Echh.
    Looking at the GCD gallery again, I think FF#77 might have been my first FF issue. At least that's the earliest one I can recall for sure that I read at the time. I could be off by a few issues as some of the immediately preceding ones look familiar too - hard to tell after years of reading back issues. But I definitely remember #77 and several other in the #80s. I always thought Psycho-Man must be one of the top FF villains, mainly because this comic made such an impression.
    Last edited by berk; 05-06-2012 at 10:35 PM.

  12. #57
    Lunatic On The Grass pinkfloydsound17's Avatar
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    I saw this thread and kind of laughed. I am also a 90's child and for me, the first comic I remember having was Amazing Spider-Man 2 (Double Trouble). It was a limited 5 issue series that came out in Canada and the US and dealt with drugs (fitting to the thread).

    From there, it morphed into Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man. I had a pretty solid run from 1-70 until I sold some of the crappier issues off last year. I kept all the nicer stuff and decided to give the rest to a local superhero themed ice cream shop. The guy running it sold comics and was looking for Spiderman since all he had was Avengers and Thor and other random stuff from the late 80's, early 90's. I gave him around 40-45 comics to sell to kids, figuring maybe one of those issues would be a gateway for some young kid. Felt good giving back.

  13. #58

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    My first two comics I got around my 6th B-day, a Superman Book and Record, where Superman battles bullets falling to the earth that are actually sentient beings and a Giant Sized Batman vs Ras Al Gul. Also my cousins had Casper, Richie Rich, Frankenstein (hero), Hot Stuff, Jughead etc. Then I would Salivate over the Charlton Ghost Stories in the Early 80's, but what really ignited the fire was in 5th grade my friend Ronnie donated a bunch of comics to the class he didn't want for some reason that we were allowed to read if we were done with our work. A bunch of Spiderman comics, Fantastic Four etc. That was the beginning of the collector phase. I probably pilfered a few of those...

  14. #59
    Senior Member Trallis's Avatar
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    For me it all started with Amazing Spider-Man during '90s. I was about 11. Unfortunately all the clone saga crap just confused the hell out of me. I would have kept reading, but I was really confused by the odd release dates of everything. I didn't have any internet so I pretty much had to bike down to the comic shop and hope I'd find a new issue. I eventually stopped reading.

    Years later when I got Cancer I found myself really bored in the hospital for sometimes more than a month at a time. That's when it occurred to me that I had really loved everything about reading comics and the anticipation of new issues coming out. First I sent my Dad to pick up an issue of Deadpool. That was the only comic I was reading until I picked up a Daredevil issue, and then I completely went nuts. Waid and Rivera's Daredevil had such a classic and rich feel to it's writing and art that I just wanted more, so my pull list started growing every week. Daredevil is the perfect super hero for a more mature reader. Kids can still enjoy it, but his appeal really works for older guys. Daredevil is older and more mature himself. He's not super strong, he may even be past his prime at this point. I can relate to the things he says and does. He's a little older than I am, so in the way that Spider-Man was a role model when I was 11, he's a role model to me in my late 20s.

    So for me it was Spider-Man originally but what really got me addicted was Waid and Rivera's Daredevil run.

  15. #60
    Junior Member randle-el's Avatar
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    TV and movies were my gateway for becoming familiar with the characters. I grew up on reruns of the old 1950's Adventures of Superman and 1960's Batman, Bill Bixby's Incredible Hulk, Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends, various incarnations of the Justice League/Superfriends, and of course Christopher Reeve's Superman movies.

    My first actual comic books though, were adaptations of movie and TV properties. My first comic was a trade paperback of Marvel's Return of the Jedi film adaptation. The first comic I actually collected was Comico's adaptation of the Robotech TV series. Eventually, I moved over to the characters and stories that were original to the comics themselves, which wasn't a huge leap since 1) they were on the racks right next to the comics I was already reading, and 2) I was already primed to read them thanks to all the TV shows and movies.

    As an aside, I think having comics sold at places like drugstores, newsstands, and supermarkets was a HUGE factor in getting me into comics. Even though I've read various arguments about why distributing comics the old way isn't really feasible anymore, I think going exclusively to direct market has/will hurt the medium in the long run. Sure, LCS are where you have your dedicated customers with more disposable income, who are willing drop lots of cash on their weekly habit. But I'm willing to bet that most of these dedicated customers grew up in an era when comics were readily available in other retail outlets. Newsstands and drugstores used to be a feeder system that got kids reading comics and eventually into the comic shops as they got older. That system is gone, and I don't think anything else has really taken its place.

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