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  1. #31
    *choke* Dan B. in the Underworld's Avatar
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    Ack! Unintentional post -- meant to edit an earlier one.
    I tend to split superhero comics fans into "People who like Krypto" and "People who don't like Krypto."
    Basically, if you miss the wonder of a dog flying around in a little Superman cape, you're in the wrong hobby.

    -- Reptisaurus!

  2. #32
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    Everything started with "The Witching Hour" #41 in the age of 3.5 years. I was with my mother in a little shop. I saw the cover, I was afraid and excited in the same moment. I wanted it. I pointed to the cover "I want that!". My mother was highly irritated: "Oh boy, never ever!!" I started to cry. And I didnt gave up crying, begging, asking for three days until my mother gave up, went to the shop and bought it for me.

    Sure, I could not read it. But I liked all these pictures and the colors. So I started my career in comic. Until I was learning to read I "read" a lot of comics - simply by watching the pictures and trying to follow the story by them: Superman, Batman, Spiderman, Avengers, Fantastic Four, Witching Hour, Star Wars, Kung Fu.

    Later on, in the age of 6 up to 11/12 I liked: Spiderman, Batman, Avangers, Fantastic Four, Conan... Superman from time time. Euorpean Comics: Asterix, Lucky Luke, Storm, Clever and Smart, Yps.

    Then came the girls. And my interest in comics faded. I stopped to read comics for nearly 25 years.

    Then I played Batman Arkham Asylum - and it reactivated something in my. I ordered some Sandman Comics, some Batman, The Crow. And I was hooked again. Next step was the Comixology App on my iPad. Since then... I am lost in comics again!

  3. #33
    Junior Member theDarkJAww13's Avatar
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    As a kid the crappy convenience store up the street from me (that I later worked at and hated) used to have a single rack of comics. Just a little farther up the street was a legit comic book store, R&R's. Anytime I went to the crappy convenience store I needed a comic... I remember distinctly getting an issue of the 90's Superboy-in-a-leather jacket comic. Other comics I got around this time were a few Daredevil issues (for some reason I remember one of them having felt-like parts on the cover? I can't remember...) and a Wolverine issue. But the three main books I got that made me respect and love comics as a whole were Batman: A Death in the Family, and the Marvel Masterworks for both Journey into Mystery (first Thor stories) and the original Uncanny X-Men (with the all-blue attires). I remember after getting the Uncanny X-men book (that I stupidly either sold or traded away at some point in my life) I went on a camping trip to a different state that my father (who bought me the book) couldn't attend. I brought the book and read it every night before bed on the trip. When I got home, my father had gotten me a couple packs of X-Men trading cards and I was too excited - after spending the week reading about these guys now I had some flashy cards for them too! Unfortunately, those too are gone. Oh, to be a reckless kid with no idea what the word "collectible" means.

    ANYWAYS. That was my childhood with comics. I'm sure I had more singles but besides those books I never really followed long arcs in comics. I mostly liked them for the characters that I saw on TV cartoons and the art. A Death in the Family was the first that I actually read all the way through, recognizing it was a full story and being interested in the death of Robin (at the time I was too young to realize there were a few Robins). That's one of the reasons I've loved Batman my entire life.

    Fast forward to a few months ago, when I'm 22 and most dudes my age around here have forgotten all about comics - I was just getting back into them. My love of Batman and superheroes followed me my entire life til I got sick of re-watching my Batman: The Animated Series DVD's or the live action movies. I needed more Batman stories and a light bulb went off above my head. Comics! I don't know why it took me so long to recognize comics and graphic novels as perfectly fine mediums of story-telling, but it did. Now I realize in a lot of cases they're the perfect medium for story telling. I immediately ordered some critically acclaimed Batman books - Dark Knight Returns, Hush - and some not-so acclaimed like Kevin Smith's books. However, I loved them all and found myself addicted to these books. Pretty soon I needed more stories and now I have a decent enough collection spanning from Batman and Thor to the Avengers and the Hedge Knight.

  4. #34

  5. #35
    Welcome to Bleeker Street MRP's Avatar
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    Spider-Man and the Avengers. Spidey was an early favorite especially on Electric Company and the Nick Hammond tv show, and I loved reruns of the Adam West Batman and Superfriends on Saturday mornings. But the book that got me buying comics sequentially and not just ooh that cover looks cool on the spinner rack when I had a quarter in my pocket was Avengers. Just as comics went up to 30 cents I discovered the lovely image of the Vision in the corner box as the Avengers took on Attumna, Graviton, Ultron and Nefaria, and then the Avengers started disappearing mysteriously. I was hooked, bought every issue of Avengers I could, until my mom decided I was "too into" comics and cut me off just as the cover price went up to 40 cents. That lasted until I started earning my own money in high school where the first title I caught back up with was....Avengers. So it started with Spidey and cartoons, but Avengers are what got me hooked.

    -M
    A lunatic is easily recognized...You can tell him by the liberties he takes with common sense...and by the fact that sooner or later he brings up the Templars.
    -Umberto Eco

  6. #36
    Senior Member dr chimp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan bailey View Post
    But without apes.

    Except, I guess, for #s 13 & 29, thanks to the Red Ghost.
    i know :(

    dc have always been the masters of apes
    "...so Hitler sends Iron Jaw's son to America to get revenge on Crimebuster." S.H.

  7. #37
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
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    I was collecting comics for a few months before I officially became hooked. The Batman movie had just come out, and everyone was buying Batman comics. I grew up on the DC superheroes, but I easily could have lost interest in the comics themselves until I got my hands on this:



    Which contained an excerpt from this:





    Watching Robin grow up before my very eyes really did something to me.


    To quote myself from a post I made a very long time ago:

    "For me, it's not the pictures, the action, the easily accessible writing, nor even the superheroes. It's the opportunity to watch characters grow and develop slowly and organically over the years, ideally earning each major change and new phase in their lives. Granted, writers who ignore continuity throw all of this out the window (and piss me off to no end in the process), but Claremont's X-Men, Wolfman/Perez's New Teen Titans, Sakai's Usagi Yojimbo, and many short lived story arcs on other titles that did their best to acknowledge continuity and growth all offer an opportunity to watch characters grow and change in response to all that they encounter over the years. It's not always more character-intensive than a good book, but it can offer greater/better earned transformation and growth.

    That's why I love comic books -- the opportunity to grow alongside my favorite characters and chart how far we've both come."


    This comic was the one that showed me all of that and made me a comic fan for life.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaxper View Post


    Which contained an excerpt from this:





    Watching Robin grow up before my very eyes really did something to me.


    To quote myself from a post I made a very long time ago:

    "For me, it's not the pictures, the action, the easily accessible writing, nor even the superheroes. It's the opportunity to watch characters grow and develop slowly and organically over the years, ideally earning each major change and new phase in their lives. Granted, writers who ignore continuity throw all of this out the window (and piss me off to no end in the process), but Claremont's X-Men, Wolfman/Perez's New Teen Titans, Sakai's Usagi Yojimbo, and many short lived story arcs on other titles that did their best to acknowledge continuity and growth all offer an opportunity to watch characters grow and change in response to all that they encounter over the years. It's not always more character-intensive than a good book, but it can offer greater/better earned transformation and growth.

    That's why I love comic books -- the opportunity to grow alongside my favorite characters and chart how far we've both come."


    This comic was the one that showed me all of that and made me a comic fan for life.
    Everything you just said. I like the art and the stories, but i keep coming back for the people.

  9. #39
    Senior Member
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    Although been reading comics since my earliest recollections includes reading "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Adventures" when I was quite, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle-watching, young, my mom & dad regularly picking one, or its variety of Turtles-related titles, for my brother and me to read, from trips to Krogers, I was not a comicbook reader until I turned ten, reading Spider-Man comics, around the time of Spider-Man the Animated Series. Ahhh, good ole' days, picking comics up at not just comicbookstores, but at Krogers, at Dairy Marts, at Wal-Marts, at Toys R-Us, with those bagged packs...

    First regular title to pick-up as a superhero reader back in the day: Untold Tales of Spider-Man. Hey, even though I ate up a lot of anything Spidey, I found those clone saga / Ben Reilly jazz too confusing for my then 10-11 year mind. Untold Tales, was like simpler days, straightforward stories of the traditional Peter Parker as traditional Spidey, with battling classics like Vulture (in his feathered Vulture-like Vulture costume), Electro, and Doctor Octopus, of the Otto Octavius variety.
    Last edited by ngroove; 05-02-2012 at 03:27 PM.

  10. #40
    Kicking the hornet's nest Jezebel Bond's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grizla View Post
    Batman pocket books!? That sounds great! The only pocket books i see in thrift stores are mad magizine and prince valient. And i always buy them because i love the format. Prince valient is still suck though. (Unless someone really likes it, then it's ok)
    I had lots of those UK pocket books that reprinted bronze-age DCs..they were like blue ribbon digests but fell apart more easier. Especially when handled by 6 year old girls *whistles*

    My gateway drug, for the past 20 or so years....ARCHIE...love the Riverdale gang....
    1 Kings 21:23

    And of Jezebel also spake the LORD, saying, The dogs shall eat Jezebel by the wall of Jezreel.

  11. #41
    It's Too Quiet Red Oak Kid's Avatar
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    I think the first comic books I had were given to me by an aunt and they had belonged to her children who were older than me. There were two Classic's Illustrated and I think Secret Origins #1. I looked at them more than actually read them. The first comics I got my mom to buy for me were DCs, probably Superboy or Superman or Flash. I know I bought some Batman issues in 63 or 64, before the TV show. I don't think I ever saw reruns of the Superman show before I started buying comics. I'm sure I was just attracted by the colorful covers and the cheap price. 12 cents was something I could afford without begging my mom for the money.
    Rehab is for Quitters

  12. #42
    CotM Member Rob Allen's Avatar
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    I bought, read and enjoyed comics starting in September 1963. I bought whatever caught my eye at the newsstand - Marvel, DC, Archie, whatever I was in the mood for. In December 1964 I bought Daredevil #6 by Stan Lee and Wally Wood. That's when I was really hooked. Two months later I bought issue #7, the first time I had ever bought two issues in a row of a comic book. I ended up buying 13 issues in a row of Daredevil, and that was my longest run for several years.
    --
    Rob Allen

  13. #43
    New Member Kickitlikeajedi's Avatar
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    My mother was one of those everythings the devil religous freaks and when i was a little girl i had picked up a witchblade comic at a garage sale. When she found it i was forced to burn it. It broke my heart and what she didn't know was i had taken a page out of it and hid it. When I was 23 i got with my husband who is a huge comic geek and he helped me find my witchblade again. I now have a collection with him that is quite impessive.

  14. #44
    Elder Member dupersuper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grizla View Post
    which comic was your gateway drug?
    For getting me into super heroes in general? New episodes of the Super Friends, reruns of Merry Marvel Marching Society and SpiderMan, the Reeve Superman movies, Super Powers and Secret Wars action figures and other such cartoons and shows and what-not.

    For getting me hooked on comics every Wednesday? Triangle era Superman comics of the late 80s/early 90s.
    Pull List; seems to be too long to fit in my sig...

  15. #45
    Senior Member prince hal's Avatar
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    Star Spangled War Stories 105.

    Late August, 1962. I was 8. Don't know how I saw it, but there it was: "War on Dinosaur Island:" a tank, a stegosaurus, and a combination as perfect as half a dozen oysters fresh from the bay and a freezing cold Stoly, neat.

    Fifty years later (Hey, it's my golden anniversary!), I've got who knows how many thousands of them up in the attic...

    Comics, not oysters.

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