Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Mild-Mannered Reporter
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    28,819

    Default When Words Collide - Apr 23, 2012

    In another installment of BEFORE THEY WERE FAMOUS, Tim takes a look at the Captain America comics right before Ed Brubaker began his enormously-long run. Robert Kirkman superheroes, Marvel-style.


    Full article here.

  2. #2

    Default

    LOVE these articles. Thanks for writing them, and keep 'em coming!

  3. #3

    Default

    Hmmm...I thought the Diamondback LMD was fake just for this story arc, not the whole time she was dating Cap. I dig that Cap went the booty call route at the end of the arc/issue. It's like "Hey, I'm a Boyscout, but I'm not passing up a hot, athletic 20 year old with pink hair. Giggity."
    I believe all that needs to be said has been. So here’s my two cents.”
    -- ScottMC, inadvertently summing up the Internet.

  4. #4
    IntrePoop Reverend rev sully's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    272

    Default

    What about StormWatch #36
    http://megasad.com/comics/covers/lar...rmwatch-36.jpg

    right before Warren Ellis' Gamechanger at
    StormWatch #37
    http://www.thecomicarchive.com/wp-co...06/ellis1.jpeg

    -Sully

    PS I love this series of columns as well! It's fun! Thanks.
    I remember the Cap MAX title on the shelves at the time of its release and didn't pick up on it. My favorite Captain America is Peter Fonda so my opinion is moot but iDigress...
    Last edited by rev sully; 04-23-2012 at 05:22 PM. Reason: better!

    "He who knows best knows how little he knows" -Thomas Jefferson

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    119

    Default

    Little harsh on the John Ney Reiber issues. Coming out of 9/11 they were pretty powerful, at least the first arc was, I think. Plus picking on a Marvel series for being decompressed in 2002 is like making fun of wearing combat boots and flannel in 1993. It's just what you did.

  6. #6
    A guy who loves comics Sam Robards, Comic Fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    236

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hutchimus View Post
    Little harsh on the John Ney Reiber issues. Coming out of 9/11 they were pretty powerful, at least the first arc was, I think...
    I agree, he was a little rough on them. I've only read the first arc, and, while it's been a while since I've read it, I really enjoyed it. Now basing the entire concept of that volume around terrorism probably wasn't the best long-term strategy, but it was very apropos for the time.

  7. #7
    Member CaptainLiberty76's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Mountaineers Are Always FREE! Give me Liberty...
    Posts
    950

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hutchimus View Post
    Little harsh on the John Ney Reiber issues. Coming out of 9/11 they were pretty powerful, at least the first arc was, I think. Plus picking on a Marvel series for being decompressed in 2002 is like making fun of wearing combat boots and flannel in 1993. It's just what you did.
    I agree--a bit too harsh on the Reiber/Cassady issues along with an unecessary dig at the TEA Party. I remember those issues, I still have them and I enjoyed them. It was also my first exposure to Cassady's art (which I still enjoy to this day). Overall, it was an interesting read and a trip down Memory Lane to some difficult memories; I lost my brother that week of 9/11.

    While I admit Reiber wasn't exactly my cup o' tea for Cap--his stories still spoke to the hearts of many Americans and are appreciated for that. the author of this article needs to remember those days and how powerful they were--particularly the scene where Cap intervenes in the abuse of a middle-eastern individual and reminds his attackers that that is NOT how Americans respond to troubles. It was GREAT stuff.
    CaptainLiberty76

    "The LESS some people know the MORE stubbornly they know it!"

    "That which does not KILL us only serves to make us STRONGER!"

  8. #8
    unwshd & smwht slitly dzd Schmakt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Davidson, NC
    Posts
    666

    Default

    I agree too... I was actually really enjoying this run until Kirkman started writing it, and I was extremely displeased to hear it get chopped and rebooted AGAIN. Brubaker's run really is fantastic, and I'm glad I kept buying, but volume 4 was fun for me until the last few months. I no longer read Cap despite Brubaker still writing the series. Tired of renumberings. So it goes...

    Of course, I also thought that Ney Reiber's "Shadows Fall" was pretty excellent back in the day...
    No one responds to street art anymore.
    People tend to respond to things like loaded guns in their faces.

    That and celebrity spokesmodels.

  9. #9
    Senior Member chastmastr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    3,916

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainLiberty76 View Post
    particularly the scene where Cap intervenes in the abuse of a middle-eastern individual and reminds his attackers that that is NOT how Americans respond to troubles. It was GREAT stuff.
    Yes, I thought the Rieber issues were very good--precisely because of scenes like that--and not at all the way Tim portrays them.

  10. #10

    Default

    Having just reread the first storyarc from that volume, I can see both the negative aspects listed in the article and the positives listed here. I read it the first time as it was coming out, and some of its power has certainly faded since a decade ago, and sometimes it is overly sappy in the way described, but up until he last chapter I really enjoyed the storyline.

  11. #11
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    5

    Default

    I am curious if you are going to tackle X-Men 113 (before the New X-Men 114), and X-Force 115 and 130.

  12. #12
    you all everybody LightningBug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    394

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainLiberty76 View Post
    I agree--a bit too harsh on the Reiber/Cassady issues along with an unecessary dig at the TEA Party. I remember those issues, I still have them and I enjoyed them. It was also my first exposure to Cassady's art (which I still enjoy to this day). Overall, it was an interesting read and a trip down Memory Lane to some difficult memories; I lost my brother that week of 9/11.

    While I admit Reiber wasn't exactly my cup o' tea for Cap--his stories still spoke to the hearts of many Americans and are appreciated for that. the author of this article needs to remember those days and how powerful they were--particularly the scene where Cap intervenes in the abuse of a middle-eastern individual and reminds his attackers that that is NOT how Americans respond to troubles. It was GREAT stuff.
    Are any digs at the Tea Party unnecessary?
    But seriously, I thought there was plenty to like about the Reiber/Cassaday run as well. Cassaday redefined Cap's depiction for years with that run -- it was he who first made the scales really look like armor, and lots and lots of copy-cats still draw him that way. Unfortunately, Chuck Austen came in and ruined the whole thing. There truly aren't any unnecessary digs at him. I also have very fond memories of the Robert Morales and Chris Bachalo run. I thought it was a gutsy take, and I always assumed it was cut short for being too politically risky. I would like to have seen it continue.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •