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  1. #1

    Default Just discovered Isaac Asimov's Foundation series

    I know im pretty late, but i am at the 3rd book so far and wow i must say, Isaac was a genius. I have not read a book that felt so well constructed and epic like the Foundation series in a while.
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    I jealous. I discovered it thirty years ago at the age of twelve.
    It was a special time for me. It gave a sense of WONDER. I hope it does the same for you.

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    Elder Member Libaax's Avatar
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    I disovered this series in 2006 and it changed my reading life completley. The epic story,historical scope, the science behind made for the first think i can actually read and enjoy SF book. I respect it always for that. I have read 100+ of SF books just because Asimov/Foundation.
    Pull List:
    The Walking Dead,Fatale,Near Death,Storm Dogs,Happy,BPRD,XO-Manowar
    American Vampire,Animal Man,Swamp Thing
    Daredevil, Winter Soldier,Indestructible Hulk

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    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    Asimov's Foundation "Trilogy" seemed as if it were the Foundation of the Science Fiction Book Club. Pretty sure I first read it when I was around 14.

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    Elder Member Shellhead's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by son of jor-el View Post
    I jealous. I discovered it thirty years ago at the age of twelve.
    It was a special time for me. It gave a sense of WONDER. I hope it does the same for you.
    Hmm. I tried to read the first book when I was 12, and I found it really dry and gave up early on. Then again, that was the year that Star Wars hit the screens, so my expectations from science-fiction were pretty shallow. Maybe I will give Foundation another try soon. I have enjoyed some of Asimov's non-fiction works.
    "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere."
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    Asimov was highly influential. It was groundbraking work. It was the 1960's, so everything was somewhat controvercial. It made me question a lot. The very nature of intelligence and sentience. Robert Heinlein's STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND was another masterpiece of that magnitude transformative.
    It was interesting to note that these were available in my school library.
    Imagine how many authors were influenced by the greats like Asimov, Bradbury, Heinlein, Tolkien, 'etc.
    These guys laid the groundwork and made our genre legitimate. I revisit their works regularly.

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    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by son of jor-el View Post
    Asimov was highly influential. It was groundbraking work. It was the 1960's, so everything was somewhat controvercial. It made me question a lot. The very nature of intelligence and sentience. Robert Heinlein's STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND was another masterpiece of that magnitude transformative.
    It was interesting to note that these were available in my school library.
    Imagine how many authors were influenced by the greats like Asimov, Bradbury, Heinlein, Tolkien, 'etc.
    These guys laid the groundwork and made our genre legitimate. I revisit their works regularly.
    It was actually the 50s. The novel versions were published between 51 and 53. However, most of the contents had previously been published in pulps throughout the 40s.

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    Yes. Originally in Astounding Magazine in the 1940's and 1950's but then
    Won the Hugo in 1966 for the novel.
    I didnt read pulps as a kid. My first exposure was via the bookshelf.
    But I do respect pulps as a great medium.

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    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by son of jor-el View Post
    Yes. Originally in Astounding Magazine in the 1940's and 1950's but then
    Won the Hugo in 1966 for the novel.
    I didnt read pulps as a kid. My first exposure was via the bookshelf.
    But I do respect pulps as a great medium.
    At the risk of being pedantic...the novels were put out by Gnome Press between 51 and 53. The Hugo was a special one-off award for "Best All-Time Series". Legend has it the award was created to honor The Lord of the Rings and Asimov was amazed when he won.

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    Mr. Asimov was a fantastic and gifted writer.I have read over 40 of his books and have not even scratched the surface of his genius.

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    Elder Member Libaax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slam_Bradley View Post
    At the risk of being pedantic...the novels were put out by Gnome Press between 51 and 53. The Hugo was a special one-off award for "Best All-Time Series". Legend has it the award was created to honor The Lord of the Rings and Asimov was amazed when he won.
    To me Foundation is only really the original 40s,50s stories in the mags that became the novels 51-53. Foundation, Foundation and Empire, Second Foundation those were great SF stories. I could barely finish the two books after that from early 1980s. I must read them now only for completation reasons along with Prelude to Foundation.

    The all time best novel series is the original trilogy. Asimov waited 30 years for some reason, one of them must have been the 80s books wasnt really needed. It was too popular to let it end at 3 book series.
    Pull List:
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    American Vampire,Animal Man,Swamp Thing
    Daredevil, Winter Soldier,Indestructible Hulk

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    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Libaax View Post
    To me Foundation is only really the original 40s,50s stories in the mags that became the novels 51-53. Foundation, Foundation and Empire, Second Foundation those were great SF stories. I could barely finish the two books after that from early 1980s. I must read them now only for completation reasons along with Prelude to Foundation.

    The all time best novel series is the original trilogy. Asimov waited 30 years for some reason, one of them must have been the 80s books wasnt really needed. It was too popular to let it end at 3 book series.
    The only novel Asimov wrote after 1980 that I found readable was The Robots of Dawn, which was still not as good as the earlier Lije Bailey novels. From there he went in to fan-wank mode trying to tie together the Robot, Foundation and Empire novels in to one "history.". He was completely unsuccessful and his writing was not close to being up to snuff. He did a few decent short stories post '80 and his memoir was excellent, but I did not like his novels at all.

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    I was meaning to ask about the prequels and sequels. Never tried any of them and it sounds like I won't be any time soon. At this point I'm more likely to re-read the original trilogy, since it's nearly 40 years ago I first read them.

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    Modus omnibus in rebus Roquefort Raider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slam_Bradley View Post
    (...) From there he went in to fan-wank mode trying to tie together the Robot, Foundation and Empire novels in to one "history."
    That's unfortunately quite accurate. I know there must always be some temptation to revisit old ground, but writers should know when to leave things well enough alone. It's paradoxical, because it's Asimov himself who gave aspiring writers this very sound piece of advice: "know at what point to begin your story". He explained how a tale should not be begun too far ahead of the main event, and that relevant information should be given as the action goes along; to start too early means the story drags and drags before anything truly interesting happens. The same thing could be said about endless sequels!

    Although some of the fan-oriented stuff like "Foundation and Earth" can be entertaining in the way comic-book continuity can be at times, writing "The gods themselves" was a much better idea: new science-fiction from the master, without ties to previous works.
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    Interesting article by Tom Holland in the Guardian from a few weeks ago, The fall of the Roman empire and the rise of Islam mentions both Asimov's Foundation and Frank Herbert's Dune. I haven't read any of Holland's books yet, but think I might have a look something now, as I liked this piece.

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