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  1. #31
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    as a newbie to the series after reading year 1 should i then read year 2 & 3. Im confused

  2. #32
    Senior Member MartinNL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Punkrat13 View Post
    as a newbie to the series after reading year 1 should i then read year 2 & 3. Im confused
    It's all in the first post of this thread. After Year One just pick up The Long Halloween (the story is continued in Dark Victory), The Killing Joke, The Dark Knight Returns, Hush, Batman & Son and continue on Morrison's run. After that take a look at the top 50 favorite stories as voted by the members of the Batman forum for more suggestions.

  3. #33
    deep green nepenthes's Avatar
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    Thanks for comments everyone, glad we can help (by we I mean the board since I rely on general opinions and gathered info to put this together)

    Quote Originally Posted by Punkrat13 View Post
    as a newbie to the series after reading year 1 should i then read year 2 & 3. Im confused
    If you check out the reading order links you'll see that the sheer volume of Batman stories published over the years makes "reading in order" a non issue. It's usually a pointless excercise. Year Two for example is no longer "canon", Year Threee is un-collected.


    Many people after reading Year One want to continue with other "early years" type stories, similair in setting and style - The Long Halloween follows on from Year One quite well, from there I'd look at Batman & the Monster Men and The Man Who Laughs as other stories from around this era.

    Quote Originally Posted by Degenerate10 View Post
    Which of Morrison's storylines are the best?
    The whole run is a collection of small story arcs that form a giant saga all together. If you don't want to start at the very beginning then try Batman Reborn, this is the beginning of the Dick & Damian era and is a great midway jump on point. The run became wildly popular when it entered this phase

    Best chapter of the run in general? You'll get a dozen different answers to this. I don't think I could even pick one....

    Quote Originally Posted by 1045 View Post
    I've been following a pretty extensive list that I happened across on the web of the Batman reading order:

    http://thebatsquad.conforums3.com/in...num=1173148575
    wow, thanks for posting this. I think I'll add it to the front page,.
    Last edited by nepenthes; 04-02-2012 at 08:14 PM.

  4. #34
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    Thanks to the OP and others for all their help. I really like Batman and have been overwhelmed by all of the options. I get what people are saying about lack of reading order.... I just want to be sure that I don't pick up something without having enough background knowledge to understand what's going on, and I think that's why so many of those types of questions/concerns come up. It isn't fun to read something and not know what the heck is going on, and I have definitely had that with some comics...

    I have read Year One, Dark Knight Returns (a few years ago), and Long Halloween. I am thinking about picking up Dark Victory because I liked Long Halloween so much. I am assuming that after I read that, The Killing Joke, and Hush, that I could jump into Grant Morrison's run without being lost?
    Last edited by mplscyclone; 04-03-2012 at 03:28 PM.

  5. #35
    deep green nepenthes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mplscyclone View Post
    Thanks to the OP and others for all their help. I really like Batman and have been overwhelmed by all of the options. I get what people are saying about lack of reading order.... I just want to be sure that I don't pick up something without having enough background knowledge to understand what's going on, and I think that's why so many of those types of questions/concerns come up. It isn't fun to read something and not know what the heck is going on, and I have definitely had that with some comics...

    I have read Year One, Dark Knight Returns (a few years ago), and Long Halloween. I am thinking about picking up Dark Victory because I liked Long Halloween so much. I am assuming that after I read that, The Killing Joke, and Hush, that I could jump into Grant Morrison's run without being lost?
    It's not so much that you need to read earlier stuff to keep from being lost, but more that the Morrison run draws on so much of Batmans diverse stylistic history that it will just give you a deeper contextual appreciation of what he's doing. But to understand the bare minimum of the run, no you don't actually need to read anything else.

    That said Killing Joke is easily the most important of the two you've mentioned. Hush is a good idea if you're already interested in the basic premise (the larger Batman universe, a big and somewhat silly popcorn action movie, same writer as Long Halloween)

    Also keep in mind the Morrison run was never supposed to be an easy read, it's designed for multiple readings and interpretations, it skips around, it doesn't spell everything out for you and when it's disorienting it's actually quite deliberate. Have fun!

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by nepenthes View Post
    It's not so much that you need to read earlier stuff to keep from being lost, but more that the Morrison run draws on so much of Batmans diverse stylistic history that it will just give you a deeper contextual appreciation of what he's doing. But to understand the bare minimum of the run, no you don't actually need to read anything else.

    That said Killing Joke is easily the most important of the two you've mentioned. Hush is a good idea if you're already interested in the basic premise (the larger Batman universe, a big and somewhat silly popcorn action movie, same writer as Long Halloween)

    Also keep in mind the Morrison run was never supposed to be an easy read, it's designed for multiple readings and interpretations, it skips around, it doesn't spell everything out for you and when it's disorienting it's actually quite deliberate. Have fun!

    Maybe you can PM me, but what do you think I should read before jumping into the Grant Morrison run? I get the whole jumping around and reading what's interesting, but I would like to have an appreciation for what Morrison did as well.

  7. #37
    Senior Member Castel's Avatar
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    Awesome thread. I was looking for some Bat-goodness to read and there sure is some good reading ideas here.

  8. #38
    Junior Member AaronStC's Avatar
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    I have the 2 new editions of Knightfall on preorder. Should I also get Batman vs Bane and Venom?

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by AaronStC View Post
    I have the 2 new editions of Knightfall on preorder. Should I also get Batman vs Bane and Venom?
    I am interested in seeing the responses. It seems to me like Knightfall is kind of a polarizing run. That said, I would guess from what I read that Batman vs Bane is probably an influence on The Dark Knight Rises, but not entirely sure.

  10. #40
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    If you've already read a handful of the classics (Year One, DKR, Killing Joke, Hush etc) that's enough to go into the run with. Being familiar with the various eras adds appreciation but I wouldn't suggest you go out and amass a whole Batman library just to get into the run - if anything I'd simply urge you to get Dark Knight Returns, and re-read it often.

    That said, there are more than a few books that will really help round and out and add to the Morrison run.

    (

    Batman & Robin (New 52) Vol.5: The Search for Damian is the spiritual, thematic and narrative sequel to Gotham's Most Wanted, in which Bruce hunts down Ra's Al Ghul and the stolen corpses of Damian and Talia with aid from allies Aquaman, Wonder Woman and Frankenstein. Previously to this arc the Batman & Robin New 52 series was generally the best showcase for Damian outside of Morrison's own run - that said the first four volumes are very scattered plotwise and up and down in consistency. Luckily you don't actually need to read the whole thing, with the standouts widely seen as being: Batman & Robin #0 expanding on Damian's childhood with the League of Assassins; Batman & Robin Annual #1 an instant classic portraying a feelgood milestone event in the father son relationship; Batman & Robin #15 a hilarious/revolting Damian VS Joker rematch with references to Batman Must Die and The Killing Joke: Batman & Robin #18 a silent memorial issue in the crushing aftermath of Damians death: and Batman & Nightwing #23 as the family grieve and together find a small level of closure.
    (2012-14) W: Peter Tomasi A: Patrick Gleason

    Batwoman: Elegy the introduction of Kate Kane and her war with The Crime Bible continues in the Batman & Robin arc Blackest Knight as collected in Batman VS Robin. Batwoman appears again in Batman Incorporated where she is tied to the return of the very first Batwoman, Kathy Kane. Beginning in Elegy a five-volume collection actually forms another critically acclaimed saga by writer/artist JH Williams, that returns frequently to foundations laid in Batman Incorporated with the blackops Department of Extranormal Operations using Kate as a proxy weapon to actively target Batman Inc and expose The Batman's true identity. Elegy is the self-contained origin arc; following trades are Vol.1: Hydrology, Vol.2: To Drown the World, Vol.3 Worlds Finest, Vol.4: This Blood is Thick.
    (2009) W: Greg Rucka A: JH Williams /// (2011) W: JH Williams, Haden Blackman A: JH Williams, Trevor McCarthy

    Dark Knight, Dark City is directly referenced as the origin of Dr Hurt via flashbacks at the climax of Return of Bruce Wayne and Batman Must Die. Laden with gore, occult and horror themes, this classic Riddler arc by Vertigo veteran and Morrison pal Peter Milligan is often mentioned as one of the best Riddler stories ever produced. A new edition due DECEMBER will also feature the best of Milligan's short yet much loved early 90's Detective run, with the story Identity Crisis in particular being an with obvious influence to Morrison's Last Rites issues as collected in R.I.P.
    (1990) W: Peter Milligan A: Keiron Dwyer / (1991) W: Peter Milligan A:Tom Mandrake

    Batman/Superman #76: The Brave and the Bold addresses one of the most glaringly problematic absences of Morrisons run - the moment Alfred, Dick and Tim realise beyond any doubt that Bruce has truly been killed. Spanning from the chaos of Final Crisis in which the Bat Family struggle to control Gotham, to the moments of Bruce's death and Wonder Woman comforting the Family in the Batcave, to an emotionally charged argument between Dick and Superman over the past and future legacy of The Batman. Dense, visceral and reflective, this issue provides the much needed cathartic fallout around one of the key moments of the entire run.
    (2010) W: Judd Winick A: Marco Rudy

    Azrael: Deaths Dark Knight continues the story of Michael Lane aka The Third Man as seen in R.I.P., and includes the critical scenes between Dick Grayson and Tal Al Ghul that will set up Damian's role in Batman Reborn. lllustrated by the master Frazer Irving before DC knew who they had and put him on Batman Must Die, here in the same moody and innovative style; tightly scripted by fan favourite Batman vet Fabian Nicieza. Azreal DDK is actually the highlight of a larger bridging event, The Battle of the Cowl, portraying the aftermath of Batman's disappearance from Gotham, a war between Two-Face and a new Black Mask, Jason Todd's murderous claim to the legacy and Dick Grayson's reluctant acceptance of of the role. Packed with guests stars and action sequences, Battle of the Cowl was a first time writing effort of artist Tony Daniel, and it clearly shows: frequently clumsy and reminiscent of a Saturday morning cartoon, it still manages to be a fun if not goofy Bat Family caper. And finally, if after'Cowl you'd like to know more about its main players Jason Todd and Black Mask, check out Under the Red Hood; the original story of Jason's resurrection and return to Gotham with the wisecracking sadist as the lead villain in probably his best showing yet.
    2009 W: Tony Daniel A:Tony Daniel /// 2009 W:Fabian Nicieza A: Frazer Irving /// 2005 W:Judd Winick A: Doug Mahnke
    Last edited by nepenthes; 07-21-2012 at 07:02 AM.

  11. #41
    deep green nepenthes's Avatar
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    The Black Mirror critically acclaimed, best selling and fan favorite, this is widely seen as the best Dick Grayson Batman story outside of Morrison's own run. An intensely moody and atmospheric crime-noir saga told in short arcs that build to larger epic, introducing new villain Tiger Shark, Sonia Zucco and James Gordon Jnr and ending with a Joker arc that revisits both Year One and the Killing Joke. The success of this 12 issue run in Detective Comics saw writer Scott Snyder relaunching Batman in the New 52 and tasked with creating a new and exciting ground-up origin in Zero Year. Snyder has also very recently drawn acclaim for the The Wake, a Vertigo horror series concerning a scientific mission to investigate an undersea civilization.
    2010 W: Scott Snyder A: Jock, Carlos Francesco Francavilla /// 2011 W: Scott Snyder A: Yanick Paquette /// 2011 W: Jeff Lemire A: Travel Foreman /// 2013 W: Scott Snyder A: Sean Murphy

    Birth of the Demon collects the entire Demon Trilogy including the brief alliance of Bruce and and Ra's Al Ghul; the desert romance of Bruce and Talia, the conception of Damian Wayne and the origin of the Demon himself. Overall an excellent Al Ghul trade that captures the globe trotting, 007-inspired "hairy chested love god" style of Batman comics that Morrison has mentioned as a major influence, illustrated in fantastically pulpy and detailed art from Jerry Brigham and lush painted scenes by Norm Breyfogle. Further back along this line is Tales of the Demon, the original Al Ghul saga by Batman legends Neal Adams and Denny O'Neil: these issues are solid classics of the 1970's "Dark Knight" renaissance, however be warned that editions printed after 2005 come with a horrible, almost amateur recoloring and the overall style of the books may feel somewhat cheesy and dated to those who are looking for the modern style.
    Son of the Demon (1987) W: Mike Barr, A: Jerry Bingham / Bride of the Demon (1990) W: Mike Barr A: Tom Grindberg / Birth of the Demon (1992) W:Denny O'Neil A:Norm Breyfogle //// (1971) W: Denny O"Neal A:Neal Adams

    Gothic several of Morrisons earlier Batman works share major themes with his later epic - in Gothic it's immortal fiends and mystic architecture, Faustian bargains and ancient mysteries - essentially a prologue for ideas within R.I.P and Batman Must Die. Eerie, unusual, densely interwoven and highly recommended. Of course another widely regarded classic is Morrisons first major Batman story Arkham Asylum: A Serious House, famous for being the highest selling OGN of all time to this day, composed of hidden symbolism and an early example of the "dark, mature, literary" style of superhero comic breaking out in the late 80's. It's here Morrison first experimented with the chameleonic Joker, with his metamorphic "super sanity" and an almost romantic affection towards Batman that is ultimately presented in R.I.P. From Arkham Asylum Morrison went on to feature Batman in his relaunched JLA, a blockbuster of the late 90's and forerunner to the contemporary style of "widescreen comics", that finally and definitively re-framed DC's Big Seven as a modern pantheon of Gods. When Bruce the Mere Mortal saves the day by singlehandedly defeating an invasion of White Martians in the series' opening arc, the notion that fans would eventually call "Bat-God" was born: that equipped with only cunning, planning and resourcefulness, against any manner of fantastic threat, Batman Always Wins.
    (1990) W: Grant Morrison A: Klaus Janson /// (1989) W: Grant Morrison A: Dave McKean /// (1996) W: Grant Morrison A: Howard Porter

    Final Crisis Grant Morrisons mind-breaking DCU space opera is often mentioned in regards to the Batman run for featuring the first portrayal of Bruce Wayne's death by the hand of Darkseid - the architect of Bruce's torture by Dr Hurt. Batman's total involvement however is contained to only a half dozen very brief pages which are eventually retold to much greater effect in Time and the Batman. A highly polarizing landmark story that draws reactions ranging from "'Beautiful, metatextual genius" to "WTF is this gibbering nonsense", FC is best attempted by the converted Morrison junkie or hardcore DCU fan. Another Morrison classic in this style is the genre bending Seven Soldiers. More conventional runs are New X-Men and All Star Superman - widely recognized as groundbreaking and redefinitive classics with a holistic approach similar to his work on Batman. A much loved and shorter self-contained Graphic Novel is We3.
    2009 W: Grant Morrison A: JG Jones /// 2005 W: Grant Morrison A: Various /// 2001 W:Grant Morrison A: Frank Quitely, Various /// 2005 W:Grant Morrison A: Frank Quitely /// 2004 W: Grant Morrison A: Frank Quitely

    The Black Casebook reprints issues from the 50's and 60's that helped influence the Morrison run, including stories featuring the Batmen-of-Many-Nations, Batman of Zur En Arrh, space medicine experiments and Batmite. These are literally reprints of goofy old comics from a simpler era. They can be interesting as a fun and whimsical novelty but personally I can't read them for more than 15 minutes. If you do find it's your thing thencheck out Batman Chronicles reprinting from the very first 1939 issues onwards, or compilations Batman in the 50's and Batman in the 60's. A more fascinating historical curio is Bat-Manga, documenting the weird 1960's merch explosion in Japan and the original manga strips featuring Lord Death Man of Batman Incorporated.
    Various

  12. #42
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    Default dick grayson from robin to nightwing

    I have only been collecting batman comics since the lauch of the new 52, so please forgive my ignorance.

    But what TPB/Graphic novel/comic run should I read to see the transformation of Dick Grayson from Robin
    to nightwing. And furthermore how long did it take for a new robin to enter batmans life? And finally what
    TPB/Graphic novel/comic run should I read for that.

    Any answers are appreciated!

    mitchie

  13. #43
    The Alpha and The Omega Godlike13's Avatar
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    Nightwing Year One has all the answers u seek. Also New Teen Titans: Judas Contract (except for the new Robin part), but i don't think NTT is even cannon anymore.
    Last edited by Godlike13; 04-13-2012 at 02:52 AM.

  14. #44
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    Thanks for the reply, I shall order this book and if I have any unresolved questions I will post them

  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by nepenthes View Post

    Many people after reading Year One want to continue with other "early years" type stories, similair in setting and style - The Long Halloween follows on from Year One quite well, from there I'd look at Batman & the Monster Men and The Man Who Laughs as other stories from around this era.
    I can highly recommend picking up the "Legends of the Dark knight" comic series (most of which have been collected in various TPBs) if you are interested in the early years.
    I have just started on a reading list and I really enjoy the early years (after year one). Currently I am skipping most TPBs on the list and just reading this series.
    I picked up a bunch of Legends of the Dark knight comics

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