Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Mild-Mannered Reporter
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    28,873

    Default CBR: Tilting at Windmills - Feb 9, 2012

    Brian Hibbs returns with TILTING AT WINDMILLS' annual analysis of the sales numbers for graphic novels in the bookstore market, and discovers a few surprises in the 2011 data.


    Full article here.

  2. #2
    Junior Member Zoidberg, M.D.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Barcelona
    Posts
    209

    Default

    You BookScan analysis is one of my favorite comicbook articles every year. As always, very interesting.
    Thanks for the effort.

  3. #3

    Default

    That is seriously fascinating reading, Brian. Thanks for doing ALL of that!

    *Edited for foolishness*
    Last edited by Rollo Tomassi; 02-10-2012 at 10:17 AM. Reason: Foolishness
    I believe all that needs to be said has been. So here’s my two cents.”
    -- ScottMC, inadvertently summing up the Internet.

  4. #4
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Another good article, Brian. As in past years, I have used it to inform my piece on the size of the overall market, fusing most of the known data. Comics are 45% of the overall market, trades 55%. But the Direct Market is still larger than the bookstore market.

  5. #5
    ... with the High Command Lemurion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Wentworth Hall, Tellus
    Posts
    2,433

    Default

    Interesting, and it just goes to show how far off the mark Dan Buckley was in his recent interview when he discussed Marvel's collections program - it clearly isn't working.
    Anyone who thinks DC is bringing back the Silver Age doesn't know what the Silver Age is.

    There is no such word as "persay," it's per se, two words, from the Latin.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    198

    Default

    I wonder how the Season One initiative will work out for Marvel.

  7. #7

    Default Barnes & Noble and DC

    Didn't Barnes & Noble stop selling a bunch of DC books because of their exclusivity deal with Amazon's Kindle? I wonder what effect that had on their Bookscan numbers?

  8. #8

    Default

    Thank you for doing this analysis Brian - it is always really interesting.

    Marvel have done awfully again! It is shocking just how badly they do. I completely agree with Brian's comments on the volume of comics coming out before film strategy - there are far too many and I would not consider buying them myself.

    I didn't see Brian mention Spider-man for Marvel beyond him selling $672k. I opened the excel file of the top 750 and searched title for 'spider' and nothing came up. I really hope I am being dense and have missed something, but does that mean no spider-man comic made the top 750? That is just bizzare. Based on their popularity and fame, Spider-man should be up against Batman every year for top selling superhero (there were 34 series with 'Batman' in the title).

    DC market Batman very effectively, or perhaps it is just that their publishing strategy over the years has led there to be more strong limited series or short runs (i.e. that can be collected in a single volume) than Marvel, who maybe focus more on longer runs, whereas their limited series are less pivotal to the characters.
    Chew, Daredevil, Fatale, Mind The Gap, The Sixth Gun and The Walking Dead

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    198

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rolacka View Post
    DC market Batman very effectively, or perhaps it is just that their publishing strategy over the years has led there to be more strong limited series or short runs (i.e. that can be collected in a single volume) than Marvel, who maybe focus more on longer runs, whereas their limited series are less pivotal to the characters.
    Off the top of my head I can only think of Kraven's Last Hunt, as a Spider-Man story that might do well as a standalone trade for new readers, but even that is mired in the continuity of Spidey having a different costume from his normal one at that time. I wouldn't even know where to start if I had to recommend an X-Men trade to someone. DC does have more classic standalone stories like The Dark Knight Returns or The Killing Joke, but I think part of the fun of reading Marvel comics is the continuity.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sandwich eater View Post
    Off the top of my head I can only think of Kraven's Last Hunt, as a Spider-Man story that might do well as a standalone trade for new readers, but even that is mired in the continuity of Spidey having a different costume from his normal one at that time. I wouldn't even know where to start if I had to recommend an X-Men trade to someone. DC does have more classic standalone stories like The Dark Knight Returns or The Killing Joke, but I think part of the fun of reading Marvel comics is the continuity.
    I realised after I posted yesterday that I can't think of any standalone Spider-man either. In fact I have never read any (non-ultimate) spider-man comics, partly because I wouldn't really know where to start.

    I tend to enjoy longer runs too, and think Marvel have quite a few accessible series that should be popular in book stores, but they run over multiple volumes and perhaps the naming/branding is off-putting and confusing?

    I don't know, it just seems that in a year where a Captain America movie comes out Brubaker's run should do really well, and Marvel tend to name and number Brubaker's collections especially badly.

    Actually I think the 'Ultimate Collections' (the brand of 10-13 issues collected together - not the imprint) are perfect for book stores, as they often collect some of the most popular runs in 2 or 3 volumes for quite a good price.
    Chew, Daredevil, Fatale, Mind The Gap, The Sixth Gun and The Walking Dead

  11. #11
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    172

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rolacka View Post
    Actually I think the 'Ultimate Collections' (the brand of 10-13 issues collected together - not the imprint) are perfect for book stores, as they often collect some of the most popular runs in 2 or 3 volumes for quite a good price.
    Too bad that both v1 of the "Ultimate" collection of Ultimate Spidey as well as JMS's run of Spidey are both out of print from Marvel!

    -B

  12. #12
    Read Savage Dragon Hanzo the Razor's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    154

    Default

    A huge problem with the "Big Two" is the lack of trade numbering and sense of consistent continuity.

    If I see Walking Dead on TV, what do I do? I go to the bookstore and find Walking Dead Vol. 1; when I'm done, I get Vol. 2, etc.

    If I see Thor, Captain America: The First Avenger, Green Lantern, or X-Men: First Class... now what? The spines aren't numbered, so you don't know which book to read first and when you look at the content, it's all over the place -- flipping through Captain America, a non-reader could feel baffled looking at the Silver Age charm of Essential Captain America, the 80's cheese of Captain America: The Captain, and the noir vibe of the Brubaker trades.

    They're not making it easy for a new reader, especially a child, to get into these books.

    I hope that part of DC's "New 52" strategy is providing clear, distinct numbering on their trades so that any fan looking for Batman this summer will be able to jump on with relative ease.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •