Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 26
  1. #1
    Member Chad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Winnipeg
    Posts
    812

    Default Why did Todd McFarlane Leave Spider-Man?

    Title says it all. I understand that there came a time when McFarlane wanted to do more than just pencil Amazing and in response, Marvel gave him his own title to both draw and write. However, why did McFarlane leave after the 16th issue of his own Spider-Man title? I've heard references to a dispute with the editor of that title, but no details. Anyone know?

  2. #2

    Default

    To form Image?
    His memory's gone! Or...is it? It's not hard to fake amnesia! The Goblin is capable of anything!

  3. #3
    Loose mongoose Venomous Mask's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Green and purple autumn
    Posts
    2,388

    Default

    I think he wanted more ownership of the characters, and they wouldn't give to him. I'm on the fence on whether or not he was right in complaining about it.
    Empty winds scrape on the soul never stop to realize/Animal whisperings intoxicate the night
    Hypnotize the desperate slow motionlight/Wash away into the rain
    Blood, milk and sky....

  4. #4
    Senior Member Xenon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    4,793

    Default

    McFarland along with several other higher profile creators left the big two in the early 90s to create Image comics. Image operated a little differently than the other publishers (at least at the time) and gave ownership of its properties to their creators. It was really a confederacy of sorts for comic book studios.

    It makes sense. As popular as Spider-Man is, he is, in the end, Stan Lee/Steve Ditko/John Romita Sr.'s creation. It's understandable that a creator would want to create his own properties and have more ownership in his work than just being a content producer for someone else's property.


    Quote Originally Posted by Venomous Mask View Post
    I think he wanted more ownership of the characters, and they wouldn't give to him. I'm on the fence on whether or not he was right in complaining about it.
    I'm not. He was wrong. I don't begrudge the man for wanting to make his own series. I would even say if it was a series that he created, he should get more ownership in the franchise, even if it's published by Marvel.

    BUT, when you're dealing with a big franchise that's existed for years before you, even if you're adding to that franchise, you have to go in with the mindset that this is not really yours. You should expect recognition and credit and all that, but as a job that you will move on from and that was there before you, I think expecting ownership above a certain point just complicates things and isn't a reasonable demand.
    Last edited by Xenon; 01-14-2012 at 11:01 AM. Reason: I'm dumb.
    When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.-C.S.Lewis

  5. #5
    I wanna hear you scream Kevinroc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    California
    Posts
    10,852

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Xenon View Post
    It makes sense. As popular as Spider-Man is, he is, in the end, Stan Lee/Steve Ditko/John Romita Jr.'s creation. It's understandable that a creator would want to create his own properties and have more ownership in his work than just being a content producer for someone else's property.
    John Romita Sr.

    (A number of people seem to make this mistake.)
    The monster saved them all. And in their fear, they betrayed him. As they always have. As they always will.

    My Facebook page

  6. #6
    Senior Member Xenon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    4,793

    Default

    I don't know why I did that. I know who I was thinking of, but whenever I put a suffix I default to Jr. Maybe It's just the fact that the first name is also a J.
    When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.-C.S.Lewis

  7. #7
    Member ViciousX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    964

    Default

    McFarlane claimed ownership of Venom. Well... all he really did was take a pre-existing design, bulk it up, and add teeth. I think he was in the wrong.

    Of course, then he turned and dicked around with other creators. Just ask Neil Gaiman.
    The Green Goblin is the anti-Spider-Man
    Dr. Octopus is the anti-Peter Parker

  8. #8
    Hey, Larry! Darrell D.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    11,368

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Xenon View Post
    McFarland along with several other higher profile creators left the big two in the early 90s to create Image comics. Image operated a little differently than the other publishers (at least at the time) and gave ownership of its properties to their creators. It was really a confederacy of sorts for comic book studios.

    It makes sense. As popular as Spider-Man is, he is, in the end, Stan Lee/Steve Ditko/John Romita Sr.'s creation. It's understandable that a creator would want to create his own properties and have more ownership in his work than just being a content producer for someone else's property.




    I'm not. He was wrong. I don't begrudge the man for wanting to make his own series. I would even say if it was a series that he created, he should get more ownership in the franchise, even if it's published by Marvel.

    BUT, when you're dealing with a big franchise that's existed for years before you, even if you're adding to that franchise, you have to go in with the mindset that this is not really yours. You should expect recognition and credit and all that, but as a job that you will move on from and that was there before you, I think expecting ownership above a certain point just complicates things and isn't a reasonable demand.
    I think he wanted ownership for NEW characters he and the other guys were creating. It's a reasonable demand as a creator, but with a corporation it's a 'Shut up and get back to your drawing board' response.
    So, they walked.
    And, ended up creating the same work for hire studios that they wanted to get away from in the first place.

  9. #9
    Junior Member dimo1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    127

    Default

    Let's listen to what Todd himself has to say about this. Mind you, it is not the only reason.

    http://spawn.com/news/events/mocca/audio.52.html

  10. #10
    Member Chad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Winnipeg
    Posts
    812

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuckles View Post
    To form Image?
    Quote Originally Posted by dimo1 View Post
    Let's listen to what Todd himself has to say about this. Mind you, it is not the only reason.

    http://spawn.com/news/events/mocca/audio.52.html
    Thank you for the link though I'm having difficulty getting it to work at the moment, but what I heard at the time - and which I didn't bother mentioning in my initial post since it sounded unlikely though I guess possible - is that McFarlane wasn't allowed to depict Juggernaut getting impaled through one of his eyes in his final Spider-Man. Again, it sounds like a rumour to started to make McFarlane sound petty but I have heard that there was a specific problem with this issue that led to a disagreement with that issue's editor that in turn led to McFarlane leaving.

    From http://marvel.wikia.com/Todd_McFarlane:

    After a 29-issue run of Amazing Spider-Man, McFarlane told editor Jim Salicrup he would be leaving the book with issue 328 to write his own work. He'd grown tired of drawing other peoples stories. Jim offered Todd a new Spider-Man book to both write and draw. It was a massive success in sales until Jim was replaced by editor Danny Fingeroth with issue 16. McFarlane quit over a creative dispute with that very issue.

    Although I'm sure McFarlane would have inevitably gone off to help found Image regardless of what was going on at Marvel, it sounds as if whatever issues were making him antsy while working on Amazing were placated until something happened with his own Spider-Man title. Just curious as to whether anyone knows what that precise "creative dispute" concerning Spider-Man 16 was.

  11. #11
    Elder Member Blade X's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    10,888

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chad View Post
    Title says it all. I understand that there came a time when McFarlane wanted to do more than just pencil Amazing and in response, Marvel gave him his own title to both draw and write. However, why did McFarlane leave after the 16th issue of his own Spider-Man title? I've heard references to a dispute with the editor of that title, but no details. Anyone know?
    According to an old interview on CNN from the early 90's, McFarlane claimed that he left Marvel because they either censored or made him redraw a scene from SPIDER-MAN that showed Shatterstar's swords piercing Juggernaut's eyeballs in a very bloody and graphic image (this was during the X-FORCE/SPIDER-MAN crossover). In that very same interview, then EIC Tom DeFalco said that the original drawing was too graphic to be shown in the book since their were a lot of kids who were reading Marvel books back then. I really wish I could find a link to that old interview.

  12. #12
    Cyclops was right OrpheusTelos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,820

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Blade X View Post
    According to an old interview on CNN from the early 90's, McFarlane claimed that he left Marvel because they either censored or made him redraw a scene from SPIDER-MAN that showed Shatterstar's swords piercing Juggernaut's eyeballs in a very bloody and graphic image (this was during the X-FORCE/SPIDER-MAN crossover). In that very same interview, then EIC Tom DeFalco said that the original drawing was too graphic to be shown in the book since their were a lot of kids who were reading Marvel books back then. I really wish I could find a link to that old interview.
    That isn't exactly an unreasonable demand. But it may have just been the straw that broke the camels back. Who knows?
    "And in a few years, some rebellious little kid is going to turn up at your school with me on his t-shirt. 'Cyclops was right.'"

  13. #13
    Elder Member Blade X's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    10,888

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OrpheusTelos View Post
    That isn't exactly an unreasonable demand. But it may have just been the straw that broke the camels back. Who knows?
    I definitely agree with you. I definitely side with Marvel on this one.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    1,064

    Default

    Its funny that Mcfarlane quit marvel to go make his own company and then eventually do the same things to others that he quit marvel for (angela/cogliostro etc)

  15. #15
    Dying Wish goes "Boink" Farmernudie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    6,284

    Default

    Like everyone, no matter the job, people like to be able to have some sort of creative freedom often.
    Ok....Superior Spider-Man is kinda interesting, i admit....that being said....i miss Peter Parker and that there isn't a "real" spider-man monthly being published

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •