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  1. #3211
    Senior Member CromagnonMan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drusilla lives! View Post
    Honestly, I think I enjoy the 70s more now then back then when I was living through them.

    Of course this is only my opinion, but as one who was there, growing up in the 70s pretty much sucked... so did most of the 80s for that matter... and most of the 90s now that I think about it.

    I suppose the only thing that sucks even more is growing up today.
    ha ha youre right, but pop culture was so much better back then though

  2. #3212
    Soul Gem Resident adam_warlock_2099's Avatar
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    I grew up in ones of those rock is evil houses, so unless it was the 50's and 60's music that m parents had already I never really got to explore much growing up. I've discovered bands/artists that I enjoy now, like Led Zepplin, Pink Floyd, Prince in my adult life. So it seems like those times would be appealing to me cause the music was good.

    My current Led Zepplin discoveries are D'yer Mak'er and Fool In The Rain. There is still one song I am sure that is theirs that I don't know the name of but it's got a long instrumental interlude in it, which seems to be the one thing I can remember about it.

    Oh god that just made me think about the time I convinced my mother to let me buy Fine Young Cannibals' first album. I love She Drives Me Crazy.
    "To alcohol, the cause of and solution to all of life's problems." -- Homer Simpson
    "You get what everyone gets. You get a lifetime." -- Death (Sandman)

  3. #3213
    Senior Member MDG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CromagnonMan View Post
    ha ha youre right, but pop culture was so much better back then though
    I think American movies were at a high point, but music took a nose dive. Mainstream comics started the decade strong, but started to ossify.
    "It's just lines on paper, folks!"

  4. #3214
    Senior Member CromagnonMan's Avatar
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    well, i can say that music was still at a high point in the UK throughout the late 70's and 80's. i think the early 70's were supposed to be a bit poor for music until punk came along. or so im told, i wasnt actually there..

    and i agree with you about movies, the 70's was a really strong decade they definately dont make films like those anymore, there doesnt seem to be the will to do that big budget artistic stuff , it just doesnt make business sense. im thinking Apocalypse Now!

  5. #3215
    *choke* Dan B. in the Underworld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CromagnonMan View Post
    i think the early 70's were supposed to be a bit poor for music until punk came along. or so im told, i wasnt actually there..
    Prog & suchlike horrible, stuffy, self-indulgent garbage made punk necessary, pretty much, not to mention the puling & crying of California-style singer-songwriters trying to cope with such soul-devastating tragedies as impurities in their cocaine & the high cost of getting their limos detailed*. Glam, on the other hand, often tended toward great (& was what a lot of burgeoning young punks cut their teeth on -- see the Banshees' cover of "20th Century Boy," Eater's takes of "Queen Bitch" & "Jeepster," Bauhaus' versions of "Telegram Sam" & "Ziggy Stardust," the Damned's tour with Marc Bolan, etc.).

    (Why, yes, I am a largely unreconstructed old punk, now that you ask ...)




    *Paging Confessor. Confessor, please set aside your granola & tie-dyed sandals & report to the thread.
    Last edited by Dan B. in the Underworld; 04-26-2012 at 08:41 AM.
    I tend to split superhero comics fans into "People who like Krypto" and "People who don't like Krypto."
    Basically, if you miss the wonder of a dog flying around in a little Superman cape, you're in the wrong hobby.

    -- Reptisaurus!

  6. #3216
    Senior Member CromagnonMan's Avatar
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    so the story goes...

    if you want to watch a very entertaining film about the music scene in England (well specifically Manchester) from the punk era through to the dance music revolution of the late 80's i recommend '24 Hour Party People' (especially if you are american and have any interest in the english music scene from that era at all, it shows a uniquely British perspective i think)

    i dont think America had the same 'rave' scene in the late 80's that we had over here:)

  7. #3217
    Senior Member Polar Bear's Avatar
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    The 1970s annoyed me even when I was too young to know they should be annoying. Looking back from today's perspective, it's easier to see how the combination of Watergate, Vietnam, and the sexual revolution changed everything at once in America, and things did go more than a little crazy. I think it took until 1990 for the echoes to start dying down.

  8. #3218
    *choke* Dan B. in the Underworld's Avatar
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    The recommendation of 24 Hour Party People is hereby seconded.

    And for the glam period just before that, I for one seriously adore the flick Velvet Goldmine.
    I tend to split superhero comics fans into "People who like Krypto" and "People who don't like Krypto."
    Basically, if you miss the wonder of a dog flying around in a little Superman cape, you're in the wrong hobby.

    -- Reptisaurus!

  9. #3219
    Senior Member prince hal's Avatar
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    Regarding the 70's...

    I, several of my friends, neighbors, and family, have long posited that the sixties began at about 1:30 Eastern Standard Time on the 22nd of November, 1963, and ended on the 8th of August, 1973.

    We weren't bound by the need for a 10-year span, just for changes in direction of the culture. Sentimentality re 11/22/63 had nothing to do with it. (We're past that, I'm afraid.)

    All this ruminating depends on your age at the time in question, of course. The hoary saw about the Golden Age of anything is germane here. Don't know whether every generation goes through stages of innocence, idealism, romanticism, faux-cynicism, genuine cynicism, stoicism, realism, et al (not necessarily in that order), but I do see a difference in generational outlooks on life. The 60's were a coming of age in many ways. The scales fell, or were stripped, from many eyes, and it was a jolt to the system. But, the 70s ushered in the kind of fashionable cynicism that doomed an idealism that in most of us had shallow roots.

    You know, it's sadder to see someone who, back then, seemed to have some sense of commitment to more than just a paycheck become a hardened conservative (read: selfish) person now. They gave up easily.

    I always thought, even then, that had we not had a draft, the war in Vietnam would have never been the issue it was. And conversely, that had we still had a draft, we would never have gone into Iraq. Much as I hate it in the abstract, the draft might be the best thing for our foreign policy. And wouldn't it extend to women, too? It's so f*&%in' easy to send other people's kids to war. And to have the service as the catch-all for "kids who have no where else to go."

    Long story short: a class of seniors in high school I taught during the first year or so of the Iraq invasion was rabidly pro-war. Didn't want to hear another opinion, regarded even a second thought about our involvement unpatriotic. Bush was frikkin' God to most of them. Suffice it to say, as we were studying Henry V, they were made to believe that in response to Bush's (all for PR) call that we all contribute somehow, Congress had reinstated the draft with no student exemptions, and females, too, to erase the notion that only the poor and the unfortunate were fighting for our "freedom" in the Middle East.

    What an outcry! "I'm moving to Canada!" "I've made plans and saved money for college!" "There are people who want to do this: let them go!" God, were they pissed when they found out it wasn't true. Exposed as the selfish, parent-parroting immature kids they were, they felt used, abused, whatever. Some realized that they'd been used and abused by the government, Fox News, etc, etc, but most still didn't get it. At least they were just kids... They were the ages of others I knew who served, are still serving, and still others who have paid a frighteningly high price over these last 10 years.

    Sorry to rant and rave, but the stench of hypocrisy sometimes is overpowering.
    Last edited by prince hal; 04-27-2012 at 05:22 AM. Reason: typo/clarity

  10. #3220
    world of yesterday benday-dot's Avatar
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    What a great post from our Prince Hal.

    But I risk a measure of hypocrisy myself, given the how and where of this post, in stating that one of the most seminal and sentimental cultural aspects of the 70's I find myself noting more and more these late and present years was that it was the last decade the world knew to be more or less free of the rabid and or felicitous means of mass communication enabled by the revolution of the home computer and the cell phone.

    Whole lives worth of work and play have changed since the 70's expired. And speaking of the movies of the 70's one of the things I always observe, with some relish I confess, is the absence of the ubiquitous cell phone. There was a time when kids used rotary phones to talk with their friends and schemes and plan and when we made our way into phone booths to impart a word over distances and on the go.

    The world was smaller.

    I doubt it was better, but neither am I prepared to be less doubtless about the world that followed that extinct period of our making.
    Last edited by benday-dot; 04-27-2012 at 08:34 PM.

  11. #3221
    Senior Member MDG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benday-dot View Post
    What a great post from our Prince Hal
    Seconded.
    (ten characters)
    "It's just lines on paper, folks!"

  12. #3222
    Modus omnibus in rebus Roquefort Raider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benday-dot View Post
    The world was smaller.

    I doubt it was better (...)
    I don't, b-d, at least when the ubiquitous cell-phone is concerned. What a time-grubbing, attention-hungry, dependence-inducing and interaction-killing device.

    Oh, and Prince Hal... thanks for your excellent post. You give me some hope for humanity, seeing as there are still sane people in the classroom!
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  13. #3223
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    I'm a big punk rock fan who also likes a lot of the old prog stuff. Yeah, it was often over-indulgent and sometimes devolved into pointless noodling, but the good stuff is up there with the best pop music ever made, in my book. King Crimson, Yes, Gabriel-era Genesis, ... even the dreaded Emerson, Lake ,and Palmer had their moments.

  14. #3224
    Senior Member mrc1214's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by berk View Post
    I'm a big punk rock fan who also likes a lot of the old prog stuff. Yeah, it was often over-indulgent and sometimes devolved into pointless noodling, but the good stuff is up there with the best pop music ever made, in my book. King Crimson, Yes, Gabriel-era Genesis, ... even the dreaded Emerson, Lake ,and Palmer had their moments.
    Punk music is a genre that I have never been able to get into. My exposure is limited the Ramones I like but I don't think I would buy an album. I'm more of a classic rock, metal fan. I also like Emerson,Lake and Palmer I have the Brain Salad Surgery album (vinyl) downstairs. The bands I like that might be considered (I'm probably wrong) would be White Stripes, Foo Fighters (only some) thats about it.

  15. #3225
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrc1214 View Post
    Punk music is a genre that I have never been able to get into. My exposure is limited the Ramones I like but I don't think I would buy an album. I'm more of a classic rock, metal fan. I also like Emerson,Lake and Palmer I have the Brain Salad Surgery album (vinyl) downstairs. The bands I like that might be considered (I'm probably wrong) would be White Stripes, Foo Fighters (only some) thats about it.
    I don't usually try to recommend music to people because everyone's tastes are so different, and there's no telling what's going to strike someone's ears, but I think if you like "classic rock" (hate the term, sorry) and metal, there's a lot of great music waiting for you in punk. Because to me, punk carried much of what was best about those pop genres after those genres themselves had become ossified and repetitive.

    So for example the Sex Pistols, to my ears, have more of the heaviness and power of early metal than do, say, the hair metal bands of the 80s. Elvis Costello (if you include his early stuff within punk, which is debatable) carried on the songwriting craftsmanship of Lennon & McCartney or Ray Davies, more than did, say, Billy Joel, and so on. The Jam had more of the spirit of The Who and the Kinks than any non-punk outfit I can think of.

    But all those punk artists brought much more to the creative table than just unimaginative rehashes of various classic rock elements. That's what makes them, for me, more worth listening to than "classic rock" traditionalists like the Black Crows or Guns and Roses.

    Another way to approach punk, if you're interested, might be through early classic rock acts that influenced or foreshadowed punk to the eextent that they're often retroactively called punk or proto-punk - Mott the Hoople, the New York Dolls, The Dictators, the Velvet Underground, Lou Reed, John Cale, ... lots of 60s & early 70s stuff you might want to check out if you haven't already.

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