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  1. #16
    In Moderation Lone Ranger's Avatar
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    I'm nearly done Vol 1 one of the Star Wars Omnibus.

    I read many of them as a child, but they are fun to revisit. I agree re. Goodwin. I'm actually finding myself more tolerant this era of Infantino than usual. I still find his pencils too two-dimensional, but certain inkers really help (Austin, natch) and he remains a very good storyteller.
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  2. #17
    NOT Bucky O'Hare! The Confessor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron King View Post
    I finally finished the first two Dark Horse "Star Wars: A Long Time Ago..." omnibuses. They collect the Marvel comics up to issue 48, and I blame my purchase of them entirely on Confessor.

    Heh, heh...You know that I'm secretly on commission from Dark Horse, right?



    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron King View Post
    The stuff with Jabba the Hut, the Wheel, Valance the cyborg, and the Tagge family were great, and of course I loved the Al Williamson art in the Empire Strikes Back adaptation.

    Glad to hear that you enjoyed these issues, Aaron. The stuff with Valance, the Wheel and the Tagge family is all classic stuff, and I love the issue featuring Jabba The Hut (spelt with only one "t" in the Marvel comics, tut-tut) in which Han, Chewie and the Millennium Falcon are at the mercy of – gulp! -- Stone Mites. Did you notice how Jabba cancelled Han Solo's debt in that issue, only to have to hastily reinstate it just prior to the start of The Empire Strikes Back adaptation (oops!).



    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron King View Post
    The omnibus only had a few issues after Empire, but they definitely seemed to lose steam. Other writers stepped in, including Larry Hama and "Wally Lombego" who I understand is JM DeMatties writing under a pseudonym. Does anyone know how much of that Cody Sunn-Childe issue got rewritten? Some of the dialogue was atrocious.

    I will say that the Mike Barr/Walt Simonson issue, "The Last Jedi," was the only one that lived up to Goodwin's work. Does Goodwin come back to full-time on the title after this? Should I buy the next omnibus?

    Well, Goodwin comes back on board for one issue (#50) but immediately following that, the Micheline/Simonson/Palmer era begins, which, it's safe to say, features some of the best comics of the entire series. In fact, I've said it before on these forums and I'll say it again: for my money, the issues set between The Empire Strikes Back and Return Of The Jedi are basically the best of the entire run...which is quite something when you consider that one of the central cast members (Han Solo) was absent from the book and Marvel were forbidden from having the hero (Luke Skywalker) come face to face with the villain (Darth Vader).

    Having said that, I certainly understand your disappointment with the first few post-ESB stories. I think that on the whole, they are fairly pleasant done-in-one issues ("The Third Law" is a particular favourite of mine) but I agree that the series feels a little like it's treading water here. Rest assured though, after issue #50 (a double sized adventure that is simply wonderful) the series gets back into its stride and some of the best Star Wars comics ever written await you IMHO. So yes, in short, it is most definitely worth picking up the next volume.

    As for your question about the extent of the re-writing done on "The Dreams Of Cody Sunn-Childe", I don't have specifics, but according to J. M. DeMattis in Back Issue magazine #9, the changes were insisted upon by none other than Lucasfilm. I'm not sure how much you already know about this, so forgive me if I'm just telling you stuff you are already aware of, but DeMattis has said that originally "the message of the story was that there is as much nobility in laying down your arms -- in dying for a dream of peace -- as there is in raising your hands in violence." But apparently Lucasfilm thought that it made their characters look bad if other characters would not fight, while saying that it was a noble thing not to fight. That's why DeMattis adopted the pseudonym of Wally Lombego...he was essentially disowning the story in disgust at the enforced rewrite.

    Incidentally, Cody Sunn-Childe was named after DeMattis' own son Cody and was supposed to be dedicated to the young boy. This is another reason why Lucasfilm's tampering with the story, which was intended to outline some of the writer's most passionately held beliefs, angered DeMattis so much.

    For what it's worth, I really loved "The Dreams Of Cody Sunn-Childe" when I first read it in the UK's The Empire Strikes Back Monthly comic...a few months before it had even been published in the U.S. I found it quite thought provoking as an 8-year-old and overall it made quite an impression on me. Even now, in spite of the somewhat dubious dialogue (Lando's closing speech is especially toe-curling) I still like the issue a lot.
    Last edited by The Confessor; 06-21-2011 at 04:32 PM.
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  3. #18
    world of yesterday benday-dot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron King View Post
    I finally finished the first two Dark Horse "Star Wars: A Long Time Ago..." omnibuses. They collect the Marvel comics up to issue 48, and I blame my purchase of them entirely on Confessor.


    I will say that the Mike Barr/Walt Simonson issue, "The Last Jedi," was the only one that lived up to Goodwin's work. Does Goodwin come back to full-time on the title after this? Should I buy the next omnibus?
    I have to say... like yourself and Lone Ranger, I have also been itching to five these omnibuses a try. I've seen many of the original Star Wars comics by Marvel, though I only own the great Marvel Treasury editions that came out way back when, and the art is quite impressive (Chaykin, Williamson, Simonson... all fantastic).

    Despite the appeal of Goodwin, I've held off looking further into Star Wars comics so far due to (sorry for the blasphemy) my rather low opinion of the Star Wars film franchise. Except for the amazing 1977 original movie and its immediate sequel Empire Strikes Back I pretty much dislike all of the remainder of the chapters of this cinematic saga.

    I guess my question (for Confessor or any other expert on things Star Wars) would be: Can you enjoy the comics even if you hold a dislike for the films?
    Last edited by benday-dot; 06-21-2011 at 04:45 PM.

  4. #19
    NOT Bucky O'Hare! The Confessor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benday-dot View Post
    I guess my question (for Confessor or any other expert on things Star Wars) would be: Can you enjoy the comics even if you hold a dislike for the films?

    Hmmmm...that's an interesting question actually. I don't really know would be my honest answer. The Marvel comics are certainly geared towards fans of the original trilogy, but as long as you have a handle on the basic premise of the films I think you could potentially just enjoy the comics as darn good space opera. They are, I believe, excellent comics in and off themselves but I obviously have an awful lot of affection for the series and therefore I might not be the best person to ask. I think I'll let others weigh in on this subject.
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  5. #20
    Kicking the hornet's nest Jezebel Bond's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benday-dot View Post
    I guess my question (for Confessor or any other expert on things Star Wars) would be: Can you enjoy the comics even if you hold a dislike for the films?
    Definitely. I've read some of the Dark Horse Star Wars books. There was one issue where the slain Darth Maul returns, resurrected by the prophets of the darkside to prove that he's a better candidate for the Emperor than Darth Vader. The intent is to destroy Darth Vader because they had doubts about his true feelings, accusing him of not being a true Sith. Maul and Vader have a light-saber duel to the death to determine who's really worthy of the Emperor. Maul's attack against Vader failed as he underestimated Vader's true power. Vader showed his hatred towards himself by stabbing through his own body to kill Maul.

    Far better than anything with Jar Jar Binks or that annoying brat from the Phantom Menace or cry-face Padme "Anakin, you're breaking my heart" *cringes*
    Last edited by Jezebel Bond; 06-21-2011 at 06:02 PM.
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  6. #21
    world of yesterday benday-dot's Avatar
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    Thanks to you both. And yes, the horrible acting in Phantom Menace and it's sequel really contribute to my dislike for that portion of the epic. I know "the brat", as you well put it, is but a child. But man there are some very good child actors out there. And unfortunately the Hayden Christiansen Anakin is no better, and even more annoying. And then there is Jar Jar, and all those embarrassing stereotypical accents, the mawkish tone to the movies, and the repellant Ewoks (yes... I hate the Ewoks!)...

    The first two films were magical. I loved them as a kid, but the rest, no matter how many attempts I make to check them out just fail for me.

    I'm glad to hear it seems like I might enjoy the comics.
    Last edited by benday-dot; 06-21-2011 at 06:51 PM.

  7. #22
    Senior Member inferno's Avatar
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    Fantastic Four #21 (1963) as reprinted in Giant-Size Fantastic Four #4 (1974) .
    Lee/Kirby.

    There's a new guy in town. He wears a purple Klansman get-up and preaches communism and racism. Goes by the name Hate-monger! Also, he has a hate-ray which he can point at people to make them hate. He points it at the Fantastic Four, and they all hate each other and fight each other.

    Reed's old war buddy Sgt. Nick Fury shows up and tells Reed he is Colo. Nick Fury, detailed to the CIA. Seems the CIA needs some help maintaining their puppet "democracy" in an unnamed South American country. Reed agrees, but Fury notes in a thought balloon that Reed is kind of acting like a dick.

    After Nick and Reed head to South America, we see the lavender klansman hop in his tunneling machine and head the same way. Stan had a great footnote here where he notes that this is realistic because the Russians are working on such a machine. This is a good reminder of how much the global military complex has kept classified in the last 50 years and helps advance my theory that comic books are more realistic than the nightly news.

    So, anyway of course the Hate-monger is running the revolution south of the border and the heroes stop it and turn off their own hate.

    Then they unmask the now-dead Hatemonger and he is .... HITLER! Unless of course, it's not Hitler and just one of his doubles, as Reed points out to the newly-minted intel agent Fury. (Presumably Hatey was "buried at sea" off-panel.)

    I also listened to the 1975 radio adaptation of this issue starring Stan Lee and Bill Murray. Best part was the incorporation of thought balloons (!!), worst was the elimination of the tunneling vehicle.

    So TWO THUMBS UP for these two masterpieces.

  8. #23
    Frugal fanboy Cei-U!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zryson View Post
    i was sorting through a comic box and came across adventure comics #282 from 1961. as it was only attached by the upper staple i decided to use it as a reader before giving it away and as i don't often do reviews, i thought i would review the issue below….

    “Lana Lang And The Legion Of Super-Heroes”
    For me, the most interesting thing about this story is that it's a nearly panel-for-panel retelling of an earlier Superboy story featuring "Mars Boy" instead of Star Boy. There are several examples of this kind of recycling in the early-'60s Weisinger books (the introduction of Mon-El is another). Alas, I can't cite issue numbers at the moment.

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  9. #24
    Kicking the hornet's nest Jezebel Bond's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zryson View Post
    as it was only attached by the upper staple i decided to use it as a reader before giving it away and as i don't often do reviews, i thought i would review the issue below….
    Oddly enough, I don't consider an 'upper-staple only' a serious flaw if the rest of the book looks in quality shape...I have a couple of similar books from the silver-age period which came with this production anomaly. I keep them with my double-cover collection (a grand total of just one book lol)...
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  10. #25
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    I mentioned last year that I got a nice run (Fine or higher) of the late 60's Sub-Mariner series.

    At the time I really enjoyed the Bill Everett issues and checking out the early work of Steve Gerber.

    Last night I pulled out Sun-Mariner 46 becuase I had only skimmed though it previously.

    Basically Subby finds his Dad held hostage by Tiger Shark. Subby and TS have a Marvel-style dust-up. Tiger Shark kills Subby's dad and escapes.

    Nice Gene Colan art though a little under-inked by Mike Esposito.

    Gerry Conway was writing the comic at the time and while I follow the age old dictum "There is no such thing as a 'classic' Gerry Conway run... Sub-Mariner 46 was a very solid Marvel Comic in an era where there simply weren't too many sub-par Marvel comics.

  11. #26
    I love the 80s! spoon_jenkins's Avatar
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    I'm still reading Essential Iron Fist vol. 1. I'm through Iron Fist #15. The only stuff left in the book are the Marvel Team-Up and Power Man issues in the transition to PM&IF. I like these last few issues more than the ones that immediately preceded them. The biggest factor is that Claremont doesn't seem to be trying so much to make it deep compared to the previous issues.

    I wonder whether Sabretooth (who debuts in #14) was created to have a link to Wolverine. Probably. In #15, (with the X-Men as guest stars) Iron Fist himself speculates that there could be a connection. And the Canadian setting of #14 is out of left field. Issue 15 is refreshing because Wolverine and Storm get to be the target of some humor (before Claremont decided they were the two greatest characters in the history of fiction).

    I mentioned in the purchase thread that I bought the first Star Wars. I've got to read it soon. Everybody here seems to be reading it; I'm dodging spoilers.

    Quote Originally Posted by Paulie View Post
    Gerry Conway was writing the comic at the time and while I follow the age old dictum "There is no such thing as a 'classic' Gerry Conway run... Sub-Mariner 46 was a very solid Marvel Comic in an era where there simply weren't too many sub-par Marvel comics.
    Meaning what? His runs were workmanlike rather than great? I think his Amazing Spider-Man is generally considered a classic run.
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    Unfortunately, Wolverine escaped to the U.S. with the X-Men. Soon after this stunning debacle, Trudeau's Liberal Party would go down to defeat in the May 1979 election.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by spoon_jenkins View Post

    Meaning what? His runs were workmanlike rather than great? I think his Amazing Spider-Man is generally considered a classic run.
    Other than the death of Gwen Stacy,I don't find anything mind-blowing about Conways ASM run.

    Workmanlike is a good word.

    I don't mean to crap on Gerry but when you look at Thomas on Conan, Moench on Master of Kung Fu, Wolfman on Tomb of Dracula, Gerber on Defenders, MacGregor on Black Panther, Wein on Thor... I personally can't come up with work from Conway that compares.

  13. #28
    BANNED Mr. O'Hara's Avatar
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    I've been re-reading my run of the Secret Society of Supervillains from the 1970's.



    It's a far from perfect book, but does have some truly brilliant moments.

    The use of the Manhunter clone gave us one fo DC's best characters without changing anything done by Simonson and Goodwin. The reintroduction of Captain Comet. And best of all the fleshing out of some of DC's very best bad guys.

    Like I said, it's from a bad period for DC from the mid-70's, so this book can get too bombastic for its own good, but still fun stories and the fun of having the spotlight on the baddies.

    Also last night I read Swamp Thing Annual 3



    Rick Veitch has some fun with DC's surprisingly large Gorilla population in this distributed little tale from the 1980's, featuring a particularly unpleasant version of Grodd.

  14. #29
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
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    Just finished Donald Duck #82. When I first started buying old Disney Ducks issues, it was with the understanding that the Carl Barks stuff was all that was worth reading, so I never gave anything else much thought. I grabbed up a huge lot of Donald Duck issues (not Carl Barks) on a whim a few years back when the dealer offered $2 an issue for them, which is pretty ridiculous.

    Well, now that I've finished reading all my Walt Disney Comics & Stories issues, I've moved onto these, and I can't believe how satisfied I've been. Again and again, I'm learning that these old Disney Comics had tons of talent outside of Barks, whether Carl Fallberg doing some really imaginative Mickey and Goofy adventures, Bob Gregory writing some ducks stories that outshone Barks in terms of fun adventure and endearing characterization (really, why isn't this guy a bigger deal??), and now, in this most recent issue, Tony Strobl has drawn some of the most adorable Donald Duck faces I've ever seen, and the unknown writer put together one heck of a story. On the surface, it's a simple but well plotted tale of absurdity in which Donald tries to impress Scrooge by caring for his lawn, and things go very wrong, ultimately resulting in cops chasing Moose chasing enormous snails across the lawn. However, the story also clearly depicts the true charm of the world of the Disney characters. Donald creates a mess for himself by trying (as always) to enter Scrooge's world of capitalism and greed, but once he screws up by trying to be shrewd and a bit unethical, caring neighbors Prof. Ludwig Von Drake and Gyro Gearloose step in at different times to selflessly help Donald solve his problem, sharing their own time and resources to do so, and even the well-meaning police ultimately step in, more concerned with helping than in enforcing the law that Donald has broken (which first got their attention). Ultimately, an entire community comes together to help one greedy and undeserving duck solve a problem he foolishly created on his own, leaving us to feel a little silly about the fact that Donald is still aspiring to impress Scrooge by the end. All of this was delivered subtly without being directly stated or thrown in our faces. It really is an ideal world the ducks live in and, much like ourselves, Donald is too busy looking at what he doesn't have to appreciate it.

    Awesome issue.


  15. #30
    Soul Gem Resident adam_warlock_2099's Avatar
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    I finally finished my Tales of the Zombie Essential. We were on the road a lot his weekend and my wife was driving (her car gets better mileage than my truck and it's a manual) so I got a chance to read a lot. It was the actual issues #6-10. Love the Pablo Marcos art and the Alfredo Alcala issue of Simon Garth's story was incredible to look at. I really enjoyed the ending of the story and thought that for a zombie story (of which I have particular attachment nor aversion to) was intricate, interesting, and had a satisfying ending. Some of the stories that Simon stumbled across and observed or got involved in reminded me a lot of some Man-Thing issues that were written from his observation of animals and humans.

    Some of the other stories, varied from okay, to good. I think a lot of the filler wasn't as good as Simon's stories, and glad I went this route instead of purchasing the original magazines. I don't think I would have felt I got as good for my money that way.

    Vampirella: Transcending Time And Space (TPB)

    Random collection (as far as I can tell chronologically anyway) of original Warren Vampirella is adventures in different planets and dimensions with the Van Helsings and Pendragon. There was a interesting story of Dracula's road to redemption that was left open in this collection. And just when I thought, as I gaze upon Jose Gonzalez's Vampirella that he couldn't draw a woman more beautiful Conjuress. So glad someone gave that man a job drawing.
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