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  1. #2686
    Ex-Cheeks Reptisaurus!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Stone View Post
    Doom Patrol,
    Yay!

    Teen Titans
    Yeah, some nice Nick Cardy stuff in there, the decent outweighs the bad, fer sure....

    and Classic X-Men volumes.
    Steel yourself. This is gonna hurt a l'il bit. Supposedly this run ends really well at least - but I haven't read the Adams stuff in well over a decade, so I can't comment much.
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  2. #2687
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    I meant to re-read the first 12 issues of Micronauts (see the purchased thread) but ended up reading Kull 7-10. I'm referring to the quite excellent Alen Zelenetz series from the mid 80s and not the even more excellent series from the Severins in the early 70s.

    Here we have 2 issues ( 7 and 10) featuring the quite beautiful John Buscema - Marie Severin team, one issue from Sal B and the Akin-Garvey team and another John B issue inked by Mel Candido. 7 and 10 are gorgeous but the other two issues looked quite nice.

    As for the stories, Kull has to navigate his way through a series of court intrigues and the departure of his friend Brule. Zelenetz is spinning a lot of plot here and it all ends rather abruptly with the cancellation of the series. I wonder if this series was finished up in Savage Sword of Conan?

    I should also mention that 7 and 8 have covers from Michael Golden and 9 and 10 have covers by Barry Smith. If we did last years Classic Comics Christmas again this series would be on it.
    Last edited by Paulie; 10-22-2013 at 11:37 AM.

  3. #2688
    Modus omnibus in rebus Roquefort Raider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paulie View Post
    I should also mention that 7 and 8 have covers from Michael Golden and 9 and 10 have covers by Barry Smith. If we did last years Classic Comics Christmas again this series would be on it.
    That series doesn't get enough exposure. It did not reach the stratospheric levels of quality of the original 11 first issues of Kull the conqueror, but it did give us a very strong Kull book, with interesting and appropriate characterization, respect for the Howard works, and lovely artwork. The Michael Golden and Barry Windsor-Smith covers were indeed very nice, especially the "repeated" ones at the end of the run (with Kull one issue being replaced by a serpent-man the next).

    Alan Zelenetz was a very good scribe and his Kull was the best Howard-inspired book of its day. He had a good handle of the character of Kull: a man of action, but with enough maturity to think things over; a king who would grab an axe and practice proactive "diplomacy" when needed, but who would also try to change things politically in his own country. His failed attempt to abolish slavery in Valusia was a nice character moment.
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  4. #2689
    Senior Member Brannon's Avatar
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    Just finished Moebius Airtight Garage, Blueberry 1 & 2 and now starting Blueberry 3 ("Angel Face"). Loved the art on Airtight Garage and was intrigued in the dreamlike, stream of conscious nature of the narrative. It was the first comic I've ever read that perfectly duplicated for me what it's like when I dream.

    I like Blueberry even better. I knew Moebius' art would be fantastic, but Charlier was a hell of a writer. Blueberry is vastly superior to any American western that I've yet to read. I have all the Blueberry graphic novels (the first set released by Epic in 1989) save for 5, which is by far the most expensive on ebay. Ugh.
    "I was handed a chocolate bar and an M-1 rifle and told to go kill Hitler."--Jack "King" Kirby

  5. #2690
    Senior Member pmpknface's Avatar
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    I was going to ask where you got the Blueberry books. I'm hoping someone like Humaniods will reprint them all someday...
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  6. #2691
    Senior Member Brannon's Avatar
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    Yeah, I got them on ebay for a very good price. I also recently got The Incal series (also the Epic versions) for a very good price as well.
    "I was handed a chocolate bar and an M-1 rifle and told to go kill Hitler."--Jack "King" Kirby

  7. #2692
    Senior Member pmpknface's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brannon View Post
    Yeah, I got them on ebay for a very good price. I also recently got The Incal series (also the Epic versions) for a very good price as well.
    Nice scores! I got the old Incal Humaniods vol's and the new Humaniods HC. Not yet purchased the Metabarons tho....
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  8. #2693
    Modus omnibus in rebus Roquefort Raider's Avatar
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    I read X-Men #97-99 by Claremont and Cockrum this morning. It aged quite well, all things considered, although certain things now just appear odd. Not the presence of the space shuttle, for example, because even though it didn't yet exist back then and has been retired by now it is still part of our collective consciousness. However, it's been many decades since a shuttle take-off would warrant a special coverage by a major TV channel. But hey, it's all cool.

    Those were the early days of the uncanny X-Men's greatness. The characters were brand new and fresh, they were not yet hindered by years and years of trauma and absurd back-stories, or by the mandates of the lunch box marketers. Anything could happen, and when it did, it was primarily so that a good story could be told; not as some stunt to sell five ancillary miniseries. Good days.

    Dave Cockrum's art is lovely. His sense of design is flawless; his spaceships look beautiful, and actually retain the same shape from panel to panel. His characters also look pretty cool; Jean Grey and Ororo are appropriately lovely, but not in the double D sex goddess sense; Scott looks like an adult nerd who starches his underwear; Kurt looks like the devil-may-care fellow that he is... excellent use of art to emphasize characterization.

    Chris Claremont was at the time reinventing the way comic-book characters talked (or thought): there was a lot of exposition, true, but it served to make the cast more three-dimensional, more relatable. Tensions and friendships developed slowly, organically, and did not seem to be plot-mandated.

    I still find some Claremontisms grating, though (sorry)! The prime example in these books is Dr Peter Corbeau, who plays the role of government scientist who can get the X-Men aboard a shuttle. It's not enough that he be a scientist, or that he be real smart (although the story does not require that he be particularly intelligent); no, he has to be a Nobel-prize winner. Scratch that, he has to be a double Nobel prize winner. Plus he has two doctorates, is an astronomer who's also a space shuttle pilot and designs and builds hydrofoils in his spare time. To say that it stretches credibility is to put it mildly (as is the sudden revelation that the brother of humble farmboy Peter Rasputin was one of the Soviet union's premier test pilots cosmonauts). There's a lot to say for simplicity, even in a book about mutants and giant robots, you know?

    Also... and this is not aimed at Chris in particular but at most comic-book writers, including Stan Lee... A doctorate (in "hard" sciences) is not a diploma you get after going to school a little (or a lot) longer, and multiple doctorates are not a way to reward someone who stayed in school even longer or worked harder. It's not about classes and about exams. It's about doing research and discovering new stuff, and the real reward is getting your results published and eventually landing a job in a prestigious institution. Most scientists would not get multiple doctorates, unless they're in very different fields (chemistry and music theory, say, or, which is more common, in biology and medicine -which is not a Ph.D.); there would be no point to it. If a chemistry Ph.D. wants to do work on a new laser system, there would be little point in pursuing another Ph.D. program in physics; much better simply to do the work and get it published, for that is the way to advance one's career.

    Note that Moira McTaggart, introduced earlier as the X-Men's housekeeper, also won the Nobel prize. (And so did Reed Richards, come to think of it). Because she's a housekeeper with a secret giant laboratory hidden in the Scottish Highlands. Whose ward is a genetic werewolf. And whose son is a murdering mutant. Ah, the joys of complicated continuity...
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  9. #2694
    Frugal fanboy Cei-U!'s Avatar
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    Just finished the final six issues of All American Men of War, two featuring the tired "Johnny Cloud" series (#115, 117), the others with the (then-) new "Lt. Steve Savage, the Balloon Buster" feature (#112-14, 116). The Navaho Ace stories were, big surprise, tepid rehashes of earlier, better episodes with uncharacteristically careless art by Irv Novick. Balloon Buster is a much better series, if only because editor/scripter Robert Kanigher is still invested in his latest creation and never has the chance to find the rut all his other characters fall into. It doesn't hurt that they're illustrated by Russ Heath (#112-13, 116) and Joe Kubert (#114). Too little, too late to save the title, alas.

    The notion, incidentally, of Steve being the son of Brian Savage a.k.a. Scalphunter? A post-Crisis retcon, the Pa Savage depicted here being far too old and downtrodden to fit that character's personality and history. Which is not to say that Kanigher wouldn't have made that connection had Scalphunter been around in '66.

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    Last edited by Cei-U!; 10-23-2013 at 02:47 PM.
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  10. #2695
    I love the 80s! spoon_jenkins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roquefort Raider View Post
    Those were the early days of the uncanny X-Men's greatness. The characters were brand new and fresh, they were not yet hindered by years and years of trauma and absurd back-stories, or by the mandates of the lunch box marketers. Anything could happen, and when it did, it was primarily so that a good story could be told; not as some stunt to sell five ancillary miniseries. Good days.
    While I like a lot more of the the X-Men's history than perhaps some Classic Comics denizens, I do agree that there's a freshness to those early issues of the All-New, All Different. Part of it is probably that the characters are getting to know each other, so their interactions haven't ossified. It's like you write below:

    Tensions and friendships developed slowly, organically, and did not seem to be plot-mandated.
    I still find some Claremontisms grating, though (sorry)! The prime example in these books is Dr Peter Corbeau, who plays the role of government scientist who can get the X-Men aboard a shuttle. It's not enough that he be a scientist, or that he be real smart (although the story does not require that he be particularly intelligent); no, he has to be a Nobel-prize winner.
    I think Corbeau is a Claremont creation, but I think he has other appearances that pre-date this one (probably in Ms. Marvel, but I might be misremembering).

    To say that it stretches credibility is to put it mildly (as is the sudden revelation that the brother of humble farmboy Peter Rasputin was one of the Soviet union's premier test pilots cosmonauts).
    I think this is something that would get out of control in the post-Claremont era where so many characters had to have remarkable back stories. They couldn't just come out of nowhere. Mikhail Rasputin would remain a footnote for the longest time until he was brought back around 1991 or 1992 (again, post-Claremont). No one ever stays dead in comics, even it seems, if his death is mentioned in passing.
    "I don't care if they have definite connections to the boy scouts. They have Weapon X - I want him back. We spent a lot of money and resources developing and training him - not to mention your group as well - I won't see it thrown away."
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    Unfortunately, Wolverine escaped to the U.S. with the X-Men. Soon after this stunning debacle, Trudeau's Liberal Party would go down to defeat in the May 1979 election.

  11. #2696
    Frugal fanboy Cei-U!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spoon_jenkins View Post
    I think Corbeau is a Claremont creation, but I think he has other appearances that pre-date this one (probably in Ms. Marvel, but I might be misremembering).
    Dr. Peter Corbeau debuted in Incredible Hulk #148 (he was Bruce Banner's college roommate). He and Starcore-One, his solar observation station, were co-created by Archie Goodwin and Herb Trimpe. Corbeau also appeared in Hulk #172 and Avengers #103 prior to being added to Claremont's repertory company. His appearance in Ms. Marvel #6 came after his participation in the Sentinels/Phoenix storyline in X-Men #98-101.

    Cei-U!
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  12. #2697
    I love the 80s! spoon_jenkins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cei-U! View Post
    Dr. Peter Corbeau debuted in Incredible Hulk #148 (he was Bruce Banner's college roommate). He and Starcore-One, his solar observation station, were co-created by Archie Goodwin and Herb Trimpe. Corbeau also appeared in Hulk #172 and Avengers #103 prior to being added to Claremont's repertory company. His appearance in Ms. Marvel #6 came after his participation in the Sentinels/Phoenix storyline in X-Men #98-101.

    Cei-U!
    Just the facts, ma'am!
    I've actually read that first Hulk appearance and the Avengers issue, but still didn't remember them. Oy!
    "I don't care if they have definite connections to the boy scouts. They have Weapon X - I want him back. We spent a lot of money and resources developing and training him - not to mention your group as well - I won't see it thrown away."
    - Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, April 1979

    Unfortunately, Wolverine escaped to the U.S. with the X-Men. Soon after this stunning debacle, Trudeau's Liberal Party would go down to defeat in the May 1979 election.

  13. #2698
    Two-Bit Blockhead DrFurball's Avatar
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    Been wanting to rediscover my favorite newspaper comic, so I bought the third and fourth "The Far Side Gallery" collections, as well as "PreHistory of the Far Side". Laughed almost to the point of tears.

  14. #2699
    Suspect Device Romero's Avatar
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    Re-read my Marvel "Monster of Frankenstein"/"The Frankenstein Monster" issues today. I think I have about 2/3 of them all. Man, another 70s book that saw some real tonal shifts.

    I adored how Friedrich and Ploog started out the series. Ploog was a genius and Friedrich was writing some text boxes that didn't bother me to read. Moench's writing on those last issues is ok but... maybe they took too long to kill it.

    I at least somewhat take back what I said in another thread about inking. I have a couple of those later issues pencilled by Val Mayerik, who I always love. One was inked by Colletta and one was inked by Dan Adkins. The difference really is night and day. The less said about the issue drawn by Bob Brown and inked by Colletta, the better...
    "There's not much of a difference between a stadium full of cheering fans and an angry crowd screaming abuse at you. They're both just making a lot of noise. How you take it is up to you. Convince yourself they're cheering for you. You do that, and some day, they will. And that's how Sue Cs it."- Sue Sylvester, "Glee"

  15. #2700
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    Quote Originally Posted by Romero View Post
    Re-read my Marvel "Monster of Frankenstein"/"The Frankenstein Monster" issues today. I think I have about 2/3 of them all. Man, another 70s book that saw some real tonal shifts.

    I adored how Friedrich and Ploog started out the series. Ploog was a genius and Friedrich was writing some text boxes that didn't bother me to read. Moench's writing on those last issues is ok but... maybe they took too long to kill it.

    I at least somewhat take back what I said in another thread about inking. I have a couple of those later issues pencilled by Val Mayerik, who I always love. One was inked by Colletta and one was inked by Dan Adkins. The difference really is night and day. The less said about the issue drawn by Bob Brown and inked by Colletta, the better...
    Ploog was genius. Kull #11 has to be one of the best illustrated issues of the Bronze Age. You never hear much about the Marvel Frankenstein series.

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