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  1. #1951
    Ex-Cheeks Reptisaurus!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Allen View Post
    Doc's prominent on the cover of FF #27, which was my first FF issue. Which one was he in before that?
    Oh.

    Nah, you're right, I didn't see him in the background there. I may need my eyes checked.

    I'm sure he didn't make the cover of his guest appearances in Journey into Mystery 108, Amazing Spider-Man Annual 2, or X-men 33, though.
    MarkAndrew at Comics Should Be Good
    All my life, my Great Dream has been to grow a triangular head - Roy Thomas

  2. #1952
    Senior Member dr chimp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roquefort Raider View Post
    Fun, fun, fun comics!!! I think I'll just keep going all the way.
    He has an amazing way of making you involved in the characters so quickly in all of his best work - I can never work out how he does it - can take him just a few pages to get me hooked. Then before you know it all hell is kicking off around you for the next 20 issues. An issue of his swamp thing always takes a good 20-30 minutes to get through as well - they are always bursting at the seams with story and characterisation. DO IT - go all the way!
    "...so Hitler sends Iron Jaw's son to America to get revenge on Crimebuster." S.H.

  3. #1953
    CotM Member Rob Allen's Avatar
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    You mean these?







    Maybe an eye checkup wouldn't be a bad idea.
    --
    Rob Allen

  4. #1954
    Senior Member pmpknface's Avatar
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    I have the ASM Ann 2 but didn't realize the good Doc was in JiM #108 or X-Men #33. I'll be adding those to my want list, just like FF #27 has been for ages. I did just get in my ST #111 though! So now I only need the #120 to complete my Dr. Strange run of that title (it skips #112 & 113 because he wasn't in those issues - talk about fighting for page space!).

    I was out sick yesterday and read all 600 pages of Tezuka's Message to Adolf vol 2. Wow, what a great tale. Tezuka brings a few things back that had only happened early on in vol. 1 which threw me a bit but it all gets wrapped up well. Another masterpiece.

    In the not so classic area I recently also read:

    Paul Pope's One Trick Rip-off and other stories. OTRO was good, not as good as his other stuff. Some of the other tales were good too, and the art is fantastic.

    The Boys vol 1-4: Man this is good stuff. I knew I'd like it too. Robertson has gotten better since I last read his stuff, and Ennis is hysterical. I need to find a vol 5 as I already 6-7.
    - pmpknface

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  5. #1955
    20% Cooler Than You Richard Bishop's Avatar
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    Just finished moving into my new house over the weekend and had a little downtime to read a few books after the kids went to bed. Outside of catching up on the current series I buy (a number that dwindles as the years go by), I got through Marvel Spotlight #12 & 13, which is the beginning of the Son of Satan run of that series. #12 continues the story from Ghost Rider #2, while #13 tells the origin of Daimon Hellstrom (which was altered in Warren Ellis' Hellstorm issues to have a more sinister bent and be less of a cliched "innocent girl seduced by Satan" story).
    "I don't hate everybody. I think I'm better than everybody. It's completely different."

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    Marvel Two-in-One #1, and Werewolf by Night #32 (at a reasonable price)

  6. #1956
    Ex-Cheeks Reptisaurus!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Allen View Post
    You mean these?




    Maybe an eye checkup wouldn't be a bad idea.
    I wasn't counting text-with-no-images, but I did totally miss him (again) on the Thor cover. I guess he gets no respect from ME, at least.
    MarkAndrew at Comics Should Be Good
    All my life, my Great Dream has been to grow a triangular head - Roy Thomas

  7. #1957
    CotM Member Rob Allen's Avatar
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    Well, that is a Kirby Doc, as was the one on the FF cover. It's different enough from Ditko's Doc to be noticeable.
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    Rob Allen

  8. #1958
    Ex-Cheeks Reptisaurus!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Allen View Post
    Well, that is a Kirby Doc, as was the one on the FF cover. It's different enough from Ditko's Doc to be noticeable.
    I appreciate the out.

    In my defense here, it took a little while for some other folks to notice the green-tinged Doctor Strange on the FF 27 cover - (Or the reprint of such in Fantastic Four Masterworks 3.) Of my sample size of six, the two people who knew who Doctor Strange was took far longer to find him than the four who didn't. We're looking for red and blue!
    MarkAndrew at Comics Should Be Good
    All my life, my Great Dream has been to grow a triangular head - Roy Thomas

  9. #1959
    CotM Member Rob Allen's Avatar
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    Yeah, that green color on Doc on the FF cover was odd. I knew who he was at the time because I'd picked up Strange Tales #120 the month prior.

    Come to think of it, the cover of X-Men #4 two months earlier had the Scarlet Witch colored green. That confused the hell out of me. I wonder if there's any connection between these odd green-tinged characters on the covers?
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    Rob Allen

  10. #1960
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    Quote Originally Posted by RBishop View Post
    Just finished moving into my new house over the weekend and had a little downtime to read a few books after the kids went to bed. Outside of catching up on the current series I buy (a number that dwindles as the years go by), I got through Marvel Spotlight #12 & 13, which is the beginning of the Son of Satan run of that series. #12 continues the story from Ghost Rider #2, while #13 tells the origin of Daimon Hellstrom (which was altered in Warren Ellis' Hellstorm issues to have a more sinister bent and be less of a cliched "innocent girl seduced by Satan" story).
    Dare I ask what that new, more sinister origin involved? Not that I remember the old one all that well: I think I only started reading SoS when Gerber took over as writer, so I probably missed the origin story.

    Quote Originally Posted by Reptisaurus! View Post
    I wasn't counting text-with-no-images, but I did totally miss him (again) on the Thor cover. I guess he gets no respect from ME, at least.
    It does seem a bit odd not to have the guest star playing as prominent a part in the cover illustration as he or she does in the story inside the cover. Then again, I don't recall those stories too well - maybe Strange doesn't do much in them, for all I know.

  11. #1961
    20% Cooler Than You Richard Bishop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by berk View Post
    Dare I ask what that new, more sinister origin involved? Not that I remember the old one all that well: I think I only started reading SoS when Gerber took over as writer, so I probably missed the origin story.
    It's been a few years since I read the Hellstorm series, but IIRC, Ellis changed the story from Daimon's mother being seduced by this charming stranger who turned out to to be Marduk Kurios (calling himself "Satan") to Daimon's mother being sold by her Satanist parents to some cult for the purposes of having her impregnated in order to have a half-human, half-demon child; the new origin included parts about her womb being tattooed with Satanic symbols to facilitate the preganancy. It was very dark stuff, even for Warren Ellis, but it was actually a pretty good read.
    "I don't hate everybody. I think I'm better than everybody. It's completely different."

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    Marvel Two-in-One #1, and Werewolf by Night #32 (at a reasonable price)

  12. #1962
    Welcome to Bleeker Street MRP's Avatar
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    With all the Superman reviews going on in these forums, I decided to finally crack open my copy of the Superman Chronicles and read through some of the Golden Age stuff. I have only read the first 2 Superman stories from Action 1 and 2 so far, but I am really digging GA Supes. I was amazed how many elements we just automatically associate with the origin of Superman were missing form the account of his origins given in Action #1. I had read that story before in other formats, but it never really hit home how much we assume are part and parcel of the mythos was actually absent from that story until I reread t this time. I think it may be an unexpected consequence of having checked out the New52 Superman and hearing people on both sides of the fence talk about what it retained and jettisoned of the core concepts of Superman that heightened my awareness of what was ans wasn't there in Action #1.

    I was also taken aback a bit when Superman threatened to tear the munitions magnate's heart out if he didn't do as Superman commanded. Not something you'd expect to see the Silver or Bronze Age Superman do.

    I only have the first three volumes of the Chronicles, but I look forward to reading the remainder of what I have as I continue to explore GA Superman.

    -M
    A lunatic is easily recognized...You can tell him by the liberties he takes with common sense...and by the fact that sooner or later he brings up the Templars.
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  13. #1963
    Ex-Cheeks Reptisaurus!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by berk View Post
    Dare I ask what that new, more sinister origin involved? Not that I remember the old one all that well: I think I only started reading SoS when Gerber took over as writer, so I probably missed the origin story.

    It does seem a bit odd not to have the guest star playing as prominent a part in the cover illustration as he or she does in the story inside the cover. Then again, I don't recall those stories too well - maybe Strange doesn't do much in them, for all I know.
    He's a minor player in the Fantastic Four story, but he's a huge part of the Spider-Man and Thor stories.
    MarkAndrew at Comics Should Be Good
    All my life, my Great Dream has been to grow a triangular head - Roy Thomas

  14. #1964
    Modus omnibus in rebus Roquefort Raider's Avatar
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    The Atlantis chronicles #3-7, by Peter David and Esteban Maroto. The first two issues had impressed me greatly; the script was engaging and the artwork very pretty indeed, with Maroto going the extra mile and drawing actual prehistoric fish in the underwater scenes (pleasing the biologist in me to no end, even if the species depicted lived millions of years apart). The rest of the series did not disappoint and is an excellent example of retroactive continuity done right. These books tie together the different versions of Atlantis seen in the DC universe, and do so while telling a story of epic proportions. More: Peter and Esteban made an effort to tie their miniseries with the works of Plato (Solon makes an appearance!) and with the Egyptian images depicting the "people of the sea" whom certain people have linked to "historical" Atlanteans. We even get to see the origin of a certain Aquaman, who remains unnamed.

    I think it's a shame that it's possible to get this magnificent series for less than cover price (postage included) more than twenty years after it was published. It deserves far more recognition!
    People in white coats (science cartoons, updated daily) | Art Blog

  15. #1965
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
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    Finally completed TMNT vol. 1 today. As promised, here's my overview for the series:


    Overview of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (Vol. 1)

    Overview: It's a common myth that, while the TMNT cartoon series of the 1980s was goofy and fun, the original comic book series was far more serious and grounded -- a myth perpetuated by creators Eastman and Laird. In fact, I still can't decide, after multiple re-readings, whether the first issue was intended to be taken seriously or as an incredibly dry attempt at absurdist humor. Either way, the series takes a turn for the ridiculous as early as the second issue and gets consistently sillier up to issue #8 to the point where it would truly be difficult to defend the notion that it was in any way more serious than what would eventually make its way into the cartoon series.

    Issues #10 and #11 mark the first clear attempt to take the title in a serious direction, and they are amongst the finest installments in the series. After that, though, Eastman and Laird walk away from the book in order to manage their new money-making empire, leaving the title in the hands of an endless line of fill-in creators. After a long stretch of pretty forgettable fill-in stories, Eastman and Laird returned for the "Return to New York" storyline (issues #19-21) only to walk away from the book again after, and this time leaving it in more questionable hands.

    With only the notable exception of Rick Veitch, this second bout of guest creators tended to be fringe indy creators looking to drum up more attention for their own work and, with absolutely no editorial restrictions placed upon them for this stretch, they went wild. A few stories from this era attempted to tell regular turtles stories (though "regular" for this series was still pretty undefined -- writers from this stretch couldn't even agree whether the turtles had permanently returned to New York or not), while most of the issues were, at best, innovative non-continuity portrayals of the turtles (#s 31, 33, 35, 36, 41) and, at worst, a totally different style of comic using one or more obligatory characters from the series in entirely out-of-character ways to somehow justify putting the story in a TMNT comic (#s 22, 23, 38, 39, and 40 being the worst offenders). There were a few truly great storylines from this stretch, but even creators desperately trying to weave together a workable continuity were accidentally contradicted by one another since no one was watching at the helm (#42 and #46, being the most glaring example, attempt to resurrect the same old storyline and characters in completely contradictory ways).

    Finally, after years of fan outcry, the gradual dwindling of Turtlemania in America, and steadily declining sales on the book, Eastman and Laird returned one final time to get the book back on track (though one could argue that there had never been a track until this moment). They plotted issues #48-62, with Laird sticking around to co-write each of those issues, and it finally provided a steady and purposeful continuity for the series, also achieving a more comfortable balance of dark/serious with just a subtle bit of goofy/fantastic thrown into the mix. It wasn't perfect, but it was certainly the finest Turtles story ever written at the time. Unfortunately, it also threw everything from issues #22-47 out of continuity, claiming to be set shortly after the events of issue #21. This meant resetting the Turtles to square one in terms of characterization, totally ignoring some important character evolution both Raphael and Donatello had undergone in several issues throughout that crazy stretch.

    In the end, it's truly hard to lend a single identity to this 62 issue run. Perhaps it's safer to say that issues #1-11, #19-21, #48-62, Tales of the TMNT #1-7, and the four one-shots were the core Turtles series, and #12-18 and #22-47 were more of an anthology series that never should have been part of the main TMNT title. Still, some of those "inbetween" issues were quite memorable and worth a read.



    Worthwhile To Read?: Yes, though that may not seem obvious until more than halfway into the run. It's very hit and miss for a while, but the journey ultimately felt very worthwhile.


    Key Issues/Highlights?:

    I'd break this down into several different reading recommendations, depending upon what you're looking for:

    The Essentials:
    #1-4 (1st appearances, origin, they meet April O'Neil)
    Raphael #1 (1st Casey Jones, and boy does he become important by the end)
    #5-7 (truly just so that you understand who one character is in #19-21)
    Leonardo #1 and #10-11 (great story, critical continuity developments)
    Tales of the TMNT #2 (required reading for #48-49)
    Tales of the TMNT #4 (required reading for #50-62)
    #19-21 (ends very very poorly, but this storyline is essential continuity for #50-62)
    #48-62 (TMNT at its very best).

    All the other great stuff:
    #8 (fun story, required reading for some later issues I'll recommend here)
    Tales of the TMNT #7 (required reading for some later issues)
    #16 (an absolute favorite of mine, though it's a massive departure from the regular series. There's a good chance that favorable response to this issue is responsible for the chaos the series becomes in issues #22-47).
    #24-26 (one of the best non-Eastman/Laird Turtles stories ever written)
    #31, 35, 36 (a radically different take on the Turtles that is darker and steeped in Feudal Japanese history)
    #37 and #42 (another of the finest non Eastman/Laird Turtles contributions ever made)
    #45 (solid stand-alone that really tries to move continuity forward for the series)

    Everything else that isn't awful and/or totally forgettable:
    #14, 15, 28, 30, 33, 34, 43, 46, 47, and you should probably read #9 just to understand #46 and #47.

    Not at all worth reading unless you absolutely need to read it all:
    Michaelangelo #1, Donatello #1, #12, 13, 17, 18, 22, 23, 27, 29, 38, 39, 40, 41, 44

    (note: I have not read the Tales of the TMNT issues and cannot comment on them other than in regard to continuity)


    Worth Re-Reading?: Possibly the whole series; definitely "The Essentials" and "All the other great stuff" I identified above.
    Last edited by shaxper; 02-12-2013 at 07:01 PM.

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