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  1. #1
    Junior Member TAG's Avatar
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    Default Forty Years ago this Month

    I thought I’d attempt something new…from forty years ago this month (using the Grand Comic Book Database as a reference - http://www.comics.org/) pick a comic book that holds some significance to you. You could have bought the comic off the spinner rack or purchased it at a convention, or perhaps by some other means (ex. “the hunt”, through back issue ads, website, trade, etc.).

    As we all know, each comic in our collection holds some meaning to us. This memory might have been established through the transaction, the artist and writer, or the story itself. Please discuss that significance.
    Why forty years as a starting point? I thought that this year was good place to start, as for some of us the stories could include buying their particular comic brand new. If we keep this up long enough, month-by-month, year-to-year, we will eventually catch up to all our “first comic book” starting points.

    So, pick a book from May, 1971, and share your experience. Hopefully, some of us can relate to your particular book of reference that you mentioned and join in on the discussion. I’ll meet you here next month for my favorite comic book from June, 1971, forty years ago.

    Here’s my pick from May, 1971…

    Teen Titans # 33 - Nick Cardy (cover), George Tuska (art), Bob Haney (story)



    Characters:
    Teen Titans [Kid Flash [Wally West]; Wonder Girl [Donna Troy]; Speedy [Roy Harper]; Lilith; Mal Duncan; Robin [Dick Grayson]; Gnarrk]; Mr. Jupiter; Knight of the Bat; Duke of the Galaxies; Lord of Lightning; Thane of the Bow; Trueshot; Cerebella; Councilman Buckminster

    Synopsis:
    Kid Flash and Mal return to the past and find the correct present, but bring Gnarrk, a caveman, with them. They must civilize Gnarrk and help him adjust to modern times.

    The significance for this particular book is quite clear for me…Nick Cardy cover. Like the Jeff Jones covers that some of you introduced me to, Cardy covers are simply, IMO, hauntingly beautiful. I purchased all of my Cardy teen titans via conventions (too numerous to remember) throughout the 80’s. Teen Titan characters Wally, Donna, Roy, Dick, and Garth, are by far among my favorites in comic fandom. I’ve always enjoyed comic book teams that were more about friends and family than with any other form of superhero team books.

    Last edited by TAG; 05-22-2011 at 05:53 PM.

  2. #2
    Kicking the hornet's nest Jezebel Bond's Avatar
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    I got this one a month ago in high-grade, completing the set/storyline with no comics authority code.



    I wasn't around in May 1971, or May 1981 for that matter, so my only opportunity to get these books in this condition is to go to the collector's market and exploit an opportunity if it comes along.
    1 Kings 21:23

    And of Jezebel also spake the LORD, saying, The dogs shall eat Jezebel by the wall of Jezreel.

  3. #3
    *blink* Chris N's Avatar
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    Here's an image of your cover, TAG: (At least I think it is)

    Last edited by Chris N; 05-22-2011 at 05:20 PM.
    formerly coke & comics

    Sleepwalker is Sandman done right. ~Tadhg

  4. #4
    *blink* Chris N's Avatar
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    I was also not buying many comics off the newsstand in 1971 when my parents were in middle school.

    Since Jez took my first choice, I'll go with:



    by Harlan Ellison, Roy Thomas, and Sal Buscema.

    ---

    Summary to the extent of my memory: Hulk gets shrunk.

    ---
    Avengers is one of my favorite comics and in fact Avengers #309 was the first comic I ever bought back in 1989. I began following the series soon after. This was my introduction to "classic Avengers". I got it with a whole set of reprint comics they made in the early '90s. This set included a random assortment of comics, including an old issue of Young Men, and the Hulk comic this issue leads into.

    At first I don't think I realized what I had was a reprint (the advertisements should have given me a clue) and I was excited at all the old comics I'd ended up with. I also don't think the name Harlan Ellison meant much to me at the time.

    Years later, I've filled in my Avengers collection around that comic and now I think I have a complete Avengers collection from #68 through New Avengers #29 with the caveat that #88 is a second printing.

    As I've never seen the need to buy the original.


    EDIT: Apparently this comic was cover dated May 1971, but actually was on the stands two months earlier. And Shaxper has rightly reprimanded me. But I'm sticking with the entry anyway.
    Last edited by Chris N; 05-22-2011 at 05:28 PM.
    formerly coke & comics

    Sleepwalker is Sandman done right. ~Tadhg

  5. #5
    Run Runner shaxper's Avatar
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    As was recently pointed out to me, Mike's Amazing World is a great resource for seeing what was actually on the stands in a given month.

    Not too much of interest to me in May of 1971 (I won't be born for another seven and a half years), other than Teen Titans #34 (because I ADORE that period of time when the title randomly descended into the realm of spooks and witchcraft) and Lois Lane #111 (strictly because of the cover).




  6. #6
    Senior Member edhopper's Avatar
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    I only bought one comic that month. Within a year I would be buying every Marvel title on the stands.
    that year is the beginning of my life as a comic collector.



    I want to point out that the May books came out several months before May. So if we want to be accurate to what we bought that month. We should be looking at July or August dated books.

  7. #7
    Junior Member TAG's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Chris N;13167416]Here's an image of your cover, TAG: (At least I think it is)

    Thanks Chris, I appreciate the help.

  8. #8
    Junior Member TAG's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=shaxper;13167512]As was recently pointed out to me, Mike's Amazing World is a great resource for seeing what was actually on the stands in a given month.



    Another Cardy coverÖfantastic. shaxper, thanks for the reference site.

  9. #9
    Junior Member TAG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris N View Post


    by Harlan Ellison, Roy Thomas, and Sal Buscema.
    I'm learning something new, I didn't realize that Harlan Ellison did any work for Marvel (I knew about dc).

  10. #10
    *blink* Chris N's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TAG View Post
    I'm learning something new, I didn't realize that Harlan Ellison did any work for Marvel (I knew about dc).
    I'm not actually certain that Ellison had much involvement with the book. I suspect (though haven't confirmed) that Thomas adapted a plot of his which had nothing to do with the Avengers.
    formerly coke & comics

    Sleepwalker is Sandman done right. ~Tadhg

  11. #11
    world of yesterday benday-dot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris N View Post
    I'm not actually certain that Ellison had much involvement with the book. I suspect (though haven't confirmed) that Thomas adapted a plot of his which had nothing to do with the Avengers.
    That particular Ellison plotted/Thomas scripted story (also borrowing from Lovecraft, to further its literary pedigree) continues in Incredible Hulk # 140.

  12. #12
    world of yesterday benday-dot's Avatar
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    I was but four years old exactly in May 1972, so I wasn't buying comics, but without a doubt the most significant comic of that time for me would be Where Creatures Roam #6. That particular issue would serve as a well oiled gateway to my now well worn path of Kirby comics. FF showed me first who Kirby was, but it was the monster comics that, funnily enough, provided me at last with cosmic awareness of the King.


  13. #13
    Junior Member TAG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edhopper View Post
    I want to point out that the May books came out several months before May. So if we want to be accurate to what we bought that month. We should be looking at July or August dated books.
    Ed, I remember buying comics as a kid and noticing how the month published didnít correspond with the actual month that I was buying the comic. I canít recall how many months the difference was or if it preceded the buying date. I wonder how long that lasted, or if it still happens today?

    Quote Originally Posted by benday-dot View Post
    I was but four years old exactly in May 1972, so I wasn't buying comics, but without a doubt the most significant comic of that time for me would be Where Creatures Roam #6. That particular issue would serve as a well oiled gateway to my now well worn path of Kirby comics. FF showed me first who Kirby was, but it was the monster comics that, funnily enough, provided me at last with cosmic awareness of the King.
    Itís amazing when you think about how many books Kirby draw at the same time. Does any artist today come close to his proficiency?

  14. #14
    *choke* Dan B. in the Underworld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TAG View Post
    Ed, I remember buying comics as a kid and noticing how the month published didn’t correspond with the actual month that I was buying the comic. I can’t recall how many months the difference was or if it preceded the buying date. I wonder how long that lasted, or if it still happens today?
    I'm pretty sure it's still in effect. I can't quote specifics, especially since (a) my comics are at home & (b) covers these days tend to omit month & year, but I'd bet Cei-U!'s money (my own is too precious, of course) that a comic coming out, say, this week will be indicia-dated August or September.
    I tend to split superhero comics fans into "People who like Krypto" and "People who don't like Krypto."
    Basically, if you miss the wonder of a dog flying around in a little Superman cape, you're in the wrong hobby.

    -- Reptisaurus!

  15. #15
    Senior Member Shawn Hopkins's Avatar
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    Looking at that Mike's Amazing World site, it seemed like there was a definite horror theme running through many of the DC books that month. Wonder Girl became a witch, Supergirl met a ghost, Wonder Woman went to a haunted house, Hawk met a ghost and Batman fought a witch or something. Interesting, I wonder if it was a coordinated storyline or just a coincidence because the horror theme was hot?

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