Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 30
  1. #1
    Mild-Mannered Reporter
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    28,899

    Default CBR: Where The Hell Am I - Jan 19, 2011

    Responding to a controversial quote from "Black Swan" director Darren Aronofsky, Jason provides some solid advice for screenwriters looking to bring their scripts to comics with a ten-point checklist of things to look out for.


    Full article here.

  2. #2
    That guy from Puerto Rico Sijo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Puerto Rico
    Posts
    1,453

    Default

    Actually, I disagree with some of the examples of "characters that 'wanted' to be comics"; many Kirby characters actually looked even better as cartoons, in my opinion. But overall, I agree with the article- comics written with a "Hollywood movie" mentality aren't very good. "Identity Crisis" for example, wanted really bad to be a murder mystery-drama, but even in that it failed. And yet they keep trying it (see Cry For Justice for a more recent example.)

  3. #3

    Default

    nail on the head aaron. keep it coming.

  4. #4
    33408 is the other way ian33407's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1,111

    Default

    how can you blame Joel SCHUMACHER ?
    WHY DON'T YOU BLAME PRODUCERS ?

    when you bring all the Bat-Family at once, don't be surprise if you can't decipher what is happening on screen...Schumacher did the penultimate blockbuster, all the movie-industry is contained in the hullah-oop move of camera that nobody can read but that solve everything...

    nice quest by the way, did you just notice that some people have the right to publish BOOKS that aren't BOOK BUT READY-MADE SCREENPLAYS ? Have you heard of Chuck Palahniuk ? The story of a guy who wrote a book that became a film who started to write books for them to become movies ?...just...just cut-off the crap please, do we all look like tourists ?
    Last edited by ian33407; 01-19-2011 at 03:56 PM.

  5. #5

    Default

    I'd be curious to hear Aaron's opinion on comic creators who makes comics just to sell movies (Mark Millar, anyone? Top Cow?). Are they taking advantage of comics as much as the people who adapt a passed on screenplay?
    "I figure the right thing starts at the beginning of the day, not after you've been caught." - John Crichton (Farscape)

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    138

    Default

    I'm sending this article to a friend. He had wrote a screenplay for his Senior Project in college and now he wants to make it into a comic (after I had introduced him to a lot of critically acclaimed material and not just Watchmen). I don't think it's to use it as a stepping stone into Hollywood, and being the second or third choice isn't so bad as long as it's not just to make the first choice jealous. Anyway, like I said I'm sending this to him to make sure he can make sure he follows most of this list.

  7. #7
    Senior Member bongoes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Somewhere...
    Posts
    1,984

    Default

    I like those ten questions. Why is it so hard to understand that comics are different from other mediums? Unfortunately both comics and video games suffer from being considered second class art forms.

    "I mean how successful were Kick-Ass or Scott Pilgrim? Those were fringe comics, right, and they were basically turned in to big pictures."

    I don't understand this quote at all. They are hugely successful comics, Scott Pilgrim is consistently one of the best selling series every month, while Kick-Ass had Millar and Romita behind it, and the movies pretty much bombed. I think it's the other way around, fringe movies, big comics.
    Pull List: Action Comics, Green Lantern, GLC, GL: New Guardians, Justice League, The Flash, Batman Inc, Batman, Nightwing, Batman & Robin, Dial H, Animal Man, Frankenstien, Earth-2

  8. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    370

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bongoes View Post
    I like those ten questions. Why is it so hard to understand that comics are different from other mediums? Unfortunately both comics and video games suffer from being considered second class art forms.

    "I mean how successful were Kick-Ass or Scott Pilgrim? Those were fringe comics, right, and they were basically turned in to big pictures."

    I don't understand this quote at all. They are hugely successful comics, Scott Pilgrim is consistently one of the best selling series every month, while Kick-Ass had Millar and Romita behind it, and the movies pretty much bombed. I think it's the other way around, fringe movies, big comics.
    Agreed. The pond of movies is obviously a whole lot larger than comics, but in terms of their respective industries, SP and K-A were much bigger as comics than movies.

  9. #9
    Westside Goth Groovie Mann's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Lomita, California
    Posts
    360

    Default

    2. Does it prominently feature a car chase or a meticulously choreographed John Woo-style shootout? Sorry, but we donít do those very well. If you insist on proceeding, better first find yourself an amazing artist. But Iím afraid Sterankoís not returning your calls. Thanks but no thanks.
    If they need that mangaka Kenichi Sonoda is the right man for the job. He does those very well in Gunsmith Cats.

  10. #10
    The Weak skinshark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    North by Northwest
    Posts
    62

    Red face

    I've had several "movie types" contacting me to adapt their screenplay to a "graphic novel". Even had a stuntman contact me...neat, huh?

    I've witnessed one "screenwriter" basically punish an artist on every panel of every page of a 96 page graphic novel because the shots weren't lining up with what was in his head. And this even after he hired an Art Director to oversee the work.

    11. Be authentic in your pursuit. You'll get more respect that way. Ask for help and do the right thing. Know that the visual language of comics is not the same visual language of film. If you want, hire a storyboard artist to storyboard your movie...it's a lot cheaper than giving up rights and you don't have to worry about printing costs, shipping, marketing etc.
    =s=

  11. #11
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Dear Jason,

    Thanks for the article and bringing the interview with Mr Aronofsky's to my attention - I do find the points he raises stimulating but something grabbed me about your article that has made me actually write something on a forum, rather than lurk for about 15 years! I must be getting old... Anyway, I hope you don't mind if I debate this issue a little.

    I feel the thrust of your email is that comic books can be fantastic mediums for expressing creativity, a wide range of emotions that goes beyond simply the visual and that it has a dedicated audience. Big thumbs up from me, I agree. And I get the point you're making is that artists should embrace the medium that they have adopted and not underestimate its potential by angling for another medium. Again I agree, and I also have noticed this trend towards the "cinematic".

    But I don't feel I can agree that a 'we', in terms of a united audience, exists for comics or any medium (or if it does, it be helpful for you to clarify who the 'we comic folk' is (... are?...is?.... hmm not sure about that one...)

    I don't feel like a minority, or that people use me as a stepping stone, in the same way that I don't feel I have any ownership of the medium or my interest resides solely in comics. If I had to measure my interests by consumption, I would be more of a film fan, but I don't pledge allegiance to either format over the other.

    As both a comic book fan and a believer in the freedom of speech, I feel I must take issue with creating any sense of guidelines on creativity. And I know, I might be taking this a bit too seriously and the tone of your piece is humorous, but I also would not in anyway want to impose barriers towards someone telling a story.

    I say... embrace this attention towards comics. If people write bad comics, let them! They might find the whole process helps them visualise their films, ask themselves questions they'd never would have thought about, engage with a public more immediately or gain strength in a new community.

    I fully support Mr Aronofsky in his comic book work - I felt that The Fountain adaptation was great, and significantly enhanced my enjoyment of the film, which I felt suffered from minor technical limitations but was on the whole inspirational. If I was to take issue with this interview, perhaps we could analyse why the interviewer, Adam Batty, thinks that by moving into comics Mr Aronofsky is "narrowing his audience". I found that question slightly off, personally and would argue the opposite.

    And to bongoes (gosh, that is so weird calling someone that... haha), I guess Mr Aronofsky is talking about the fact that Scott Pilgrim and Kick-Ass despite being popular comics, still remained underground in terms of the wider public's attention of them. The interviewer, Mr Batty, brings up a similar counterpoint to the comment you made, and Mr Aronofsky clarifies his position by stating that he personally had never heard of the titles, hence 'fringe' from his viewpoint.

    Anyway, I have spent a lot of time typing and not a lot of time writing an essay I was supposed to submit... so I will sign off. But lastly, again thanks for bringing the 'Hope Lies at 24 frames per second' blog to my attention, it looks great. All I would say to you is that I'd like to see another checklist for screenwriters looking to get into both comics and movies with less 'no's and can't dos, and more of 'recommend', 'investigate' and 'consider'.

    And please don't cry inside! You have enormous strength and you should see it as your mission to use your gift to impart good advice onto others. Everyone has to start somewhere.

    best of luck,

    Michael

  12. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    138

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by conversationist View Post
    And to bongoes (gosh, that is so weird calling someone that... haha), I guess Mr Aronofsky is talking about the fact that Scott Pilgrim and Kick-Ass despite being popular comics, still remained underground in terms of the wider public's attention of them. The interviewer, Mr Batty, brings up a similar counterpoint to the comment you made, and Mr Aronofsky clarifies his position by stating that he personally had never heard of the titles, hence 'fringe' from his viewpoint.
    I can't really disagree with you too much on most of what you say, except for two points. The one above for example:
    "It seems like if you come up with an original script, in Hollywood itís not as effective as a comic book. It doesnít even have to be successful as a comic; I mean how successful were Kick-Ass or Scott Pilgrim? Those were fringe comics, right, and they were basically turned in to big pictures."
    Here, at the point that I emphasized, Aronofsky clearly states that Scott Pilgrim and Kick-Ass weren't successful as comics. He is then told otherwise and then changes his point into them not needing to be known to the populace as a whole.
    And I think this attitude of Aronofsky's validates Aaron's; Aronofsky clearly views comic readers as an unimportant audience. He doesn't care if we don't read it, he just wants it to exist so he can make a movie about it. That's not exactly a sign of faith in the art form as anything other than a stepping stone to get what he wants.

    Quote Originally Posted by conversationist View Post
    All I would say to you is that I'd like to see another checklist for screenwriters looking to get into both comics and movies with less 'no's and can't dos, and more of 'recommend', 'investigate' and 'consider'.

    Michael
    As much as that sounds great, a lot of the best advice comes in the forms of don'ts. There is no right way to write, but there are a lot of wrong ways. Giving positive guidelines often comes across as "This is THE way to write. Do this." While negative guidelines are more like putting fences around giant sinkholes with signs saying "Danger."
    Take these for example:
    http://sararyan.com/2010/03/more-tip...t-do-part-one/

    http://sararyan.com/2010/03/more-tip...do-part-three/
    Knowing what not to do gives you more freedom to try other things without being as worried that you're doing something wrong. And in the case of the links I posted, they keep you from ticking off your collaborator.
    20th Century Boys 7 Billion Needles Akira Battle Angel Alita Fullmetal Alchemist GANTZ Negima Oh My Goddess Ooku, Yotsuba&!
    Amazing Spider-Man Batman Inc BPRD DMZ Fables Hellboy Orc Stain

  13. #13
    BANNED
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    360

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Predator View Post
    I'd be curious to hear Aaron's opinion on comic creators who makes comics just to sell movies (Mark Millar, anyone? Top Cow?). Are they taking advantage of comics as much as the people who adapt a passed on screenplay?
    Mark Millar was a comic book writing pro long before Kick-Ass and Wanted turned blockbuster. He's written maybe 200 comics scripts? Roughly 4,400 pages of script.

    Furthermore, he's one of the top 2 highest quality comics writers of the last decade. If he wants to play around creating original characters, that directors from the genius Vaughan, to Tony Scott are dying to work with, that's a testament to the quality level of his idea making and writing skills. (Of course for Kick-Ass, all he had to do was write my biography )

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skinshark View Post
    I've witnessed one "screenwriter" basically punish an artist on every panel of every page of a 96 page graphic novel because the shots weren't lining up with what was in his head. And this even after he hired an Art Director to oversee the work.
    Wow. That sounds incredibly frustrating. It sounds like the screenwriter was so oblivious as to the way comics are made that he simply tried laying the instructions for making a movie over a different medium so he could maintain some illusion of control.

    I think we already have enough passionless comics made by editorial committee out there. We really don't need Hollywood pasting their process over our medium to muck things up even more.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Steve Broome's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,127

    Default

    Lol @ saying Mark Millar only writes scripts to make movies.

    Anyway one thing I hate is Hollywood companies/individuals that clearly have no interest in finishing stories. It's a complete slap in the face to comic book buyers.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •