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  1. #1
    Senior Member edhopper's Avatar
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    Default The Unwritten Discussion Thread (contains spoilers)

    No thread for two issues? This comic is great! Is it too literate for most readers? I am sure those still reading it find it intelligent, engaging and fun.
    Tom seeking "the source" while Ahab seeks the symbolic white whale. The layers of allusion and the ideas about the power of the written word are brilliant.
    And I love Vince Locke's pen line inking over Gross' pencils.

  2. #2
    Veteran Member El Sombrero's Avatar
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    I read the first trade and I thought it was a very well-done comic, but I had no real motivation to pick up the next volume. It's written well but none of the characters grabbed me and I just didn't really "care" enough.

    The cover artist is one of the best in the industry though, his work is so amazing.
    Saga, Private Eye, Chew, Umbral, Deadly Class, Pretty Deadly

    She-Hulk, Ghost Rider, Loki, Moon Knight, Iron Fist, Daredevil, Punisher, X-Factor

  3. #3
    Not comics, it's Vertigo. noh-varr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edhopper View Post
    No thread for two issues? This comic is great! Is it too literate for most readers? I am sure those still reading it find it intelligent, engaging and fun.
    Tom seeking "the source" while Ahab seeks the symbolic white whale. The layers of allusion and the ideas about the power of the written word are brilliant.
    And I love Vince Locke's pen line inking over Gross' pencils.
    Depending on the month and my mood, Unwritten is my favorite issue I purchased (sometimes Chew and Sweet Tooth take over the top spot) I am sadly an issue behind and will hopefully pick up 21 this week. I did love the start to the Moby Dick arc though, and love the pace Carey and Gross have set. Just in the last two issues (19 and 20) we have Tom remember his past with Lizzy, the two of them hook up, Savoy admitting to Lizzy he was bitten by the Count, and Wilson magically showing up as Ahab when Tom enters the story. The series is brilliant, and once I have read 21 (and reread the previous issues of the arc for refresher) I shall return with more comments.
    Noh-Varr Reviews: The Silence of Our Friends by Mark Long, Jim Demonakos, and Nate Powell.

  4. #4
    Join the flock! Awesome!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edhopper View Post
    This comic is great! Is it too literate for most readers? I am sure those still reading it find it intelligent, engaging and fun.
    Tom seeking "the source" while Ahab seeks the symbolic white whale. The layers of allusion and the ideas about the power of the written word are brilliant.
    And I love Vince Locke's pen line inking over Gross' pencils.
    Yes to all of this. The pacing continues to be excellent as well. This is my second favorite Vertigo book, right behind Scalped.

    Quote Originally Posted by El Sombrero View Post
    The cover artist is one of the best in the industry though, his work is so amazing.
    He is actually a she but yes Yuko is awesome.

  5. #5
    The lava is plan B. BeastieRunner's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    I still love the choose your own adventure story the best so far. I'd like so see them play with form more (like the chapter titles).
    "Thus Spake Dr. Dinosaur, King of Time: Adios Morons!" -- Dr. Dinosaur

  6. #6
    Senior Member edhopper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeastieRunner View Post
    I still love the choose your own adventure story the best so far. I'd like so see them play with form more (like the chapter titles).
    That was an amazing issue. Something that should have gotten much more recognition than it did.

    I guess people are to busy talking about All the pretty colors in Green Lantern

  7. #7
    The lava is plan B. BeastieRunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edhopper View Post
    That was an amazing issue. Something that should have gotten much more recognition than it did.

    I guess people are to busy talking about All the pretty colors in Green Lantern
    I find there's not much to talk about till an arc is over. I remember the same thing when reading Y, V, and Sandman. You may analyse each chapter individually, sure, but that real meat and potatoes comes at the end when it is all together.

    I think this is a harder series to discuss because of all the literature involved and kids these days don't want to work at things that are hard.
    "Thus Spake Dr. Dinosaur, King of Time: Adios Morons!" -- Dr. Dinosaur

  8. #8
    Say WHAT?!?!?!? FanboyStranger's Avatar
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    Unwritten is the best book produced by the Big Two right now. This was another fine issue, and I am extremely impressed by the Gross-Locke combination on the Moby Dick story. As writer, Carey gets the lion's share of praise for this series, but I'd like to shine the light on Gross a bit more. The Unwritten isn't really revolutionary in any way as far as artistic technique, but Gross has refined so many storytelling elements like the computer forum pages, the media pages, the "choose-your-own-adventure" origin of Lizzie Hexam, and even the literary pages in this current arc. He's really stretching himself as artist in producing interesting storytelling techniques, and it's cool to be someone who was already regarded as an exceptional storyteller try new things rather than rest on his (deserved) laurels.

  9. #9
    Savior of the Universe Flash Gordon's Avatar
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    Unwritten is the best book produced by the Big Two right now.
    This is the stone cold truth.

  10. #10
    The lava is plan B. BeastieRunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flash Gordon View Post
    This is the stone cold truth.
    Indeed! I look forward to it each month.
    "Thus Spake Dr. Dinosaur, King of Time: Adios Morons!" -- Dr. Dinosaur

  11. #11
    Not comics, it's Vertigo. noh-varr's Avatar
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    Alright so #21, again a lot happened and there are a few key things I am wondering about. First up, Frankenstein's monster says he was the first which is why he and Tom have a special bond. Now is that because he was the first thing Tom created when he was little after watching the movie or is it because he was the first son that had his father attempt to turn him into some kind of magical messiah using literature? I am starting to think the latter after in the flashback Wilson went on about how it was Frankenstein monster's father that turned him into being a true monster. Just a random thought. If nothing else it was funny that Wilson told that story and then acted like he wasn't doing the same to Tom.

    The rules of the stories are starting to add up and I think an important one that came up in this issue was how an aspect or reflection of Wilson was in the story. Does this mean we will see the image of Wilson in other stories Tom enters? And is there anyway these after effects of Wilson can be used to revive him?

    I really am not sure why the world stopped at the end, though I love the idea, nor do I see how the puppet mistress will be defeated, but both should be very interesting to read. Is the next issue the last of this arc is there another part left after?
    Noh-Varr Reviews: The Silence of Our Friends by Mark Long, Jim Demonakos, and Nate Powell.

  12. #12
    The lava is plan B. BeastieRunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noh-varr View Post

    I really am not sure why the world stopped at the end, though I love the idea, nor do I see how the puppet mistress will be defeated, but both should be very interesting to read. Is the next issue the last of this arc is there another part left after?
    They've been doing 5 part stories for awhile. It's usually followed by a one-shot that fits into the world building/thematic elements categories.
    "Thus Spake Dr. Dinosaur, King of Time: Adios Morons!" -- Dr. Dinosaur

  13. #13
    Canadian Lunatic Zolton's Avatar
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    I think I'm done with this series. Mike's been dragging out the mystery angle for far too long without giving the readers enough to go off of. Also there's a balance that needs to be struck when dealing with literary reference heavy comics; they need to be interesting regardless if the reader understands what's being referenced. See League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.

    I mean Mike Carey did say he plans to go to 60 issues (the Vertigo benchmark), right? I'm sure I read that somewhere. It would suck if nothing gets explained until the finale, I don't need another Y: The Last Man, thanks.
    Reading: Fantastic Four, All-Star Western, Aquaman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Justice League, Demon Knights, Scalped and The Walking Dead

  14. #14
    Join the flock! Awesome!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zolton View Post
    I think I'm done with this series. Mike's been dragging out the mystery angle for far too long without giving the readers enough to go off of.
    I am usually the first one to hate stories like this(lost being a good example. Morning Glories also as a more recent one) but I really feel like the plot is being advanced at a good pace.
    Also there's a balance that needs to be struck when dealing with literary reference heavy comics; they need to be interesting regardless if the reader understands what's being referenced. See League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.
    I don't think I have read a single one of the works that have been referenced in this comic and it really has not been a problem for me. Different strokes I guess.

  15. #15
    Not comics, it's Vertigo. noh-varr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zolton View Post
    I think I'm done with this series. Mike's been dragging out the mystery angle for far too long without giving the readers enough to go off of. Also there's a balance that needs to be struck when dealing with literary reference heavy comics; they need to be interesting regardless if the reader understands what's being referenced. See League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.

    I mean Mike Carey did say he plans to go to 60 issues (the Vertigo benchmark), right? I'm sure I read that somewhere. It would suck if nothing gets explained until the finale, I don't need another Y: The Last Man, thanks.
    I would disagree with you on the pace of things, a lot has happened and it has been far from stagnant thus far. Carey has even said in interviews that he and Gross planned out a faster paced book as that was a big complaint with Crossing Midnight. I also don't really see it as a big mystery book, the only big mystery is what Wilson's plans for Tom are/were. He seems to have been pushed to help fight the evil literary organization (whose name escapes me at the moment) but beyond that we don't know. Sure a lot of other things aren't completely explained, like how they are going into stories, how the stories are giving powers to people, why the organization is gaining power and trying to control things, and a ton of other things, but a lot of other things have been explained. There is no big central mystery that is being teased like in Y, or Lost, or any other big mystery stories that have come out in the last decade. Now obviously if you think the pace is too slow, can't force you to think otherwise, but I just don't see this being a slow book nor a book based solely on a mystery.

    As for the literary aspect of things, I don't believe they ever go overboard with the concepts without explaining what you need to know to enjoy the work. So far none of the stories they have leaped into have been anything I have read or watched (we did have the arc where they went into propaganda films) and I never felt like they were doing too much in talk that made the work hard for me to read or get into the story. I am sure I have missed some cool nods towards the works and in jokes that I would have gotten and appreciated if I had read the literature that was being referenced, but I have never felt at a loss of understanding. A huge aspect of this is having Savoy there asking "wtf" and being lost when it comes to the literary references, it gives a reason for Tom and other characters to explain things without it being forced.

    I do hope you give the book another chance down the road, Vertigo books and other less mainstream titles need all the readers it can get.
    Noh-Varr Reviews: The Silence of Our Friends by Mark Long, Jim Demonakos, and Nate Powell.

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