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  1. #1
    Mild-Mannered Reporter
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    Default CBR: Pipeline - Dec 28, 2010

    Augie recaps 2010 as viewed through the lens of the Pipeline, taking a look back at the year in digital comics, "The Walking Dead" and an awful lot of reviews plus a look ahead at 2011's offerings from Cinebook.


    Full article here.

  2. #2

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    Man, I understand you're still dabbling your feet in the shore of the vast ocean that is Franco-Belgian comics, but that's a really glaring mistake.

    JEAN VAN HAMME is a WRITER, probably the most succesful one in the history of European comics.

  3. #3

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    BTW, Cinebook's efforts are marred by their systematic censorship of their books, not to mention the usual shrinkage of the European size that you so rightly complain about.

  4. #4

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    If you like van Hamme, have you checked out Thorgal?

  5. #5
    Steven Willis nyrdyv's Avatar
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    Default Digital Comics

    Consider the actually investment required for firms like Marvel and DC to go full-bore into the digital arena. It is clearly a step, possibly somewhat overdue, for mainstream publishers to be moving to a fully digital model.

    Like it or not, this is a change that will not be reversed and will change the comic book industry significantly as the years go by.

    Working out the exact revenue stream will inevitably be the main hurdle still to overcome. The proliferation of piracy even in digital comics will probably end up harming the direct sales models. So, some form of integrated advertising revenue stream will have to be developed to maintain this business model long term.

  6. #6
    New Member CaNNoN_FoDDa's Avatar
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    Default Thanks

    Thanks for the shout-out, I'm glad you're enjoying our work. Slipcases are a great suggestion and I'll pass that on to the management. We've only recently started to complete series, so it hasn't been as relevant up to now (although, I guess it would be nice to have them for every 5 or 10 of the longer series).

    You may be interested to know that there is also a movie series being made of Largo Winch (with one on DVD so far). It's pretty big budget and, while it isn't very faithful to the original story, it's good fun.

    Our policy is to concentrate on acquiring and publishing new titles, so we aren't spending much money on anything else - we don't do any merchandise and we do very little marketing.

    As XIII points out, Jean Van Hamme is the writer, not the artist.

    We do censor some of the imagery in our books. There are some restrictions on what we can publish, particularly in the US, in terms of adult content. Mainland Europe are much more liberal about these things than the UK or US and, in the US, if we were to publish some scenes of nudity in one book we would run the risk of distributors dropping us completely. In order to reach the largest audience possible, we have opted to censor nudity (by adding clothes, steam, hair...) with the consent of the right-holders (usually including the artist).

    The boss does have a vague idea to create an imprint for adult titles, but we want to concentrate on getting books to the widest possible audience for the moment.

    Regarding the volumes versus stories thing, this change was in response to customer feedback. Personally, I think I prefer the double-albums, but it is a bit harder to get people to pick up the first volume when it costs that little bit more. Also, it means we can translate and publish them faster. So, you get less, more often.

    We're always interested to hear people's feedback on our work and also suggestions for new series to pick up. There is a huge volume of great material in French and very little of it has made it to the English market before. It can be expensive or difficult to get publication rights to some series, but we can still try! You can contact us through our website or on Facebook.

    It's a pretty small company, with only two permanent employees at the moment, so I apologise in advance if it takes us a while to respond.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by XIII View Post
    Man, I understand you're still dabbling your feet in the shore of the vast ocean that is Franco-Belgian comics, but that's a really glaring mistake.

    JEAN VAN HAMME is a WRITER, probably the most succesful one in the history of European comics.
    Yeah, that's a stupid mistake, probably caused by the Franco-Belgian tradition to credit the artist first, then the writer. American comics go in the other direction, and the momentary confusion did me in.

    -Augie

  8. #8
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    I know this might get me in trouble, but I'm more annoyed by the smaller page size than the covered-up nudity. Aside from the occasions where it's glaring and obvious, the retouched art doesn't really bother me. It doesn't hurt the story to not see a nipple.

    But missing the art at full size does bother me a little, just because I know the art looks better at that size.

    Both are obviously concessions done for practical reasons. I don't like either, but I'm willing to trade them off for just having the material on my bookshelf.

    I saw that the next "Largo Winch" movie features Sharon Stone in it. Fascinating. Maybe she can get a part in the upcoming "Asterix" movie, too. If she could only get a cameo in Spielberg's "Tintin," she could complete the trifecta. heh.

    And, yes, I am already a Facebook fan. =)

    Thanks for stopping in. Now excuse me while I go place this Amazon order for more "Largo Winch". . .

    -Augie

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    Quote Originally Posted by chrissama200 View Post
    If you like van Hamme, have you checked out Thorgal?
    I have not. Is it good? At first glance, it doesn't look like my kind of thing, but my mind is open...

    -Augie

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Augie De Blieck Jr. View Post
    I have not. Is it good? At first glance, it doesn't look like my kind of thing, but my mind is open...

    -Augie
    Fantasy/adventure with a little SF thrown in. The story is good, and I love the art.

  11. #11
    Crusader of Justice dancj's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CaNNoN_FoDDa View Post
    We do censor some of the imagery in our books. There are some restrictions on what we can publish, particularly in the US, in terms of adult content. Mainland Europe are much more liberal about these things than the UK or US and, in the US, if we were to publish some scenes of nudity in one book we would run the risk of distributors dropping us completely. In order to reach the largest audience possible, we have opted to censor nudity (by adding clothes, steam, hair...) with the consent of the right-holders (usually including the artist).

    The boss does have a vague idea to create an imprint for adult titles, but we want to concentrate on getting books to the widest possible audience for the moment.
    What I found a bit amusing with Metabarons was that the Humanoids editions were censored, but the DC editions weren't. It felt like the Europeans were being more prudish than Americans which definitely isn't the norm.

    Personally I find it a bit of a deal-breaker. I'm not desperate to see nipples in my comics, but it really irritates me to see silly censorship like this. Though admittedly it never bothered me in the Humanoids editions of Metabarons because I didn't realise they'd been censored.

  12. #12
    New Member CaNNoN_FoDDa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Augie De Blieck Jr. View Post
    I know this might get me in trouble, but I'm more annoyed by the smaller page size than the covered-up nudity. Aside from the occasions where it's glaring and obvious, the retouched art doesn't really bother me. It doesn't hurt the story to not see a nipple.
    I think most of us at Cinebook agree with you on that. I believe the motivation for sometimes publishing in a smaller size is that there's a crazy jump in the price between the two sizes for longer books (like Largo, XIII, Scorpion).

    Quote Originally Posted by dancj View Post
    Personally I find it a bit of a deal-breaker. I'm not desperate to see nipples in my comics, but it really irritates me to see silly censorship like this. Though admittedly it never bothered me in the Humanoids editions of Metabarons because I didn't realise they'd been censored.
    We're not censoring for the sake of censoring - I think we'd all prefer to keep the original art. But if it's a choice between getting distributed and making a few small changes to elements not key to the storyline, it's a bit of a no-brainer. You have to be looking for it to notice it (or compare the original).

  13. #13
    Crusader of Justice dancj's Avatar
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    Is it that hard to get distributed. I don't know about America, but here in England I see plenty of adult Vertigo/Fantagraphics/other Indie books on the shelves in bookshops.

  14. #14
    Crusader of Justice dancj's Avatar
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    I just thought I'd raise this thread from the dead because I've finally got a Cinebook that I managed to get cheap - The Catastrophe.

    I haven't read it yet but I've flicked through. The censorship is mildly amusing (assuming it's the bit where a woman removes her bikini top to reveal a bra underneath).

    The much worse crime though is on the spine. Why on earth does the text go from bottom to top? Every other book on my shelves (since I got rid of Essential Spider-Man vol1) goes from top to bottom, so why go against that. That's going to drive me mad. I could store the book upside down (as I do with the occasional CD that commits the same crime) but then the volume number would be upside down.

    Gah!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by dancj View Post
    The much worse crime though is on the spine. Why on earth does the text go from bottom to top? Every other book on my shelves (since I got rid of Essential Spider-Man vol1) goes from top to bottom, so why go against that. That's going to drive me mad. I could store the book upside down (as I do with the occasional CD that commits the same crime) but then the volume number would be upside down.
    That's the way they do it in the rest of the world, I've been told. Or maybe it's just the British or European way? Cinebook is a British company. I guess they don't want to re-orient the spines for one edition of the book.

    -Augie

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