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  1. #16
    Junior Member LUNI_TUNZ's Avatar
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    Right, I forgot I posted in here.

    OK, by bitching, I mean that at the pricing issue, the way the column was worded, it felt like what was being said was. "it wasn't done fast enough", and something else I don't remember right now.

    Personally, I think Marvel's going about it better by not dropping all their books at the rip, and starting slow, because in case that it's not profitable enough, and they have to raise that extra dollar again, then people will really kick off bitch-fits.

    I think stating that by waiting for January will cause some stores to close is being a tad-bit dystopic, and chances are they were on the verge of closing anways.

    And quality of content is ttly opinion based. and I refuse to get into it. (There's enough of that elsewhere on the boards)

    Also, tardy publishing seems to have become a part of the business, it sucks, I hate it. But sometimes it seems artists are late, wrters are late. I don't necessarily know the behind-the-scenes of the late books in these days, but I'm fairly sure noone's sitting in their, twirling their comically long mustaches and purposefully delaying their books saying "Yes, I've made more people wait for my book, aren't I teh evil?"

    If JMS's statement for why he fell behind is correct (not that I'd imply he's lying about having bronchitis-related health problems) should he be made to only work on One-shots and limited series (which is what I believe you replied along the lines of to me)

    I'll give you Comic Crash. Which is what I've started calling things like your example of the Bruce Wayne Returns/Road Home books. Of course, I guess they figure it'd be better than pushing them back. meh.

  2. #17
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    It's amazing that superhero comic fans take such abuse from Marvel & DC. What if a show like Mad Men or Glee aired episodes weeks late, out of order with, plots changed from the preview ads & fill-in actors despite who's listed in the opening credits?

  3. #18
    out chasing comets Kevin Street's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpurtl View Post
    Why is it so easy for monthly magazines to publish on time like clockwork when they have to deal with a ton more complications in getting something to printers on time? There are dozens of artists/authors/contributors working on your average monthly magazine like Men's Health while your average comic book has about 6-8 people doing most of the work on it. Yet rarely are there delays in the magazine industry? Can you imagine the drop in subcriptions if a magaine was perpetually two months late or like in the case of some Kevin Smith works or Lee/Miller works, just never ship.
    The answer to that simple: comic books are defined now by talent, while monthly magazines are still defined by content. You don't buy Men's Health because there's an article in this month's issue by a writer you really like - you buy it because you're interested in Men's Health. But we all buy comics now for the creative teams working on them, and that makes it tough to enforce discipline on the creators. In the (admittedly bad and exploitative) old days, the fans would buy Superman or Avengers no matter who wrote and drew it, so the publishers could force those creators to work to schedule. If they missed too many deadlines, they were removed and new creators were assigned to the comic.

    In the old days the publishers had far too much power, and artists and writers were terribly exploited, typically working for years and years with little to show for it at the end of their careers. Today the creators have the leverage to turn in the best product they can whenever they can finish it, but this leads to an industry of infrequent and unpredictable release schedules like Hibbs describes, which is bad for everyone over the long term. It would be nice if the industry could find some happy middle between the extremes where creators were treated with respect, but still had to produce on time.

  4. #19
    Junior Member LUNI_TUNZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by coreybean View Post
    It's amazing that superhero comic fans take such abuse from Marvel & DC. What if a show like Mad Men or Glee aired episodes weeks late, out of order with, plots changed from the preview ads & fill-in actors despite who's listed in the opening credits?
    Funny you should say this, often times shows may get pre-empted by some sort of game, not to mention when networks randomly change when the show air-time airs last minute. FOX is notorious for this. Futurama, and Family Guy were victims of this.


    a very popular anime series (The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya) scthick is that it's episodes are aired out of production order (far as I know this was not by design), there's disputes over which way is better. Yes, some people actually like watching this show out of order. And while it's episodic, there's actual continuity between episodes. Not to mention the dreaded Endless Eight arc, which literally aired the same episode (with slight alterations) eight times in a row, for eight weeks straight in it's second season. And while this turned some people off, there are people who actually frickin liked it.

    So, superhero comic fans aren't the only ones willing to take abuse.

  5. #20
    Seducer of the Innocent Torsten Adair's Avatar
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    Given the "fusterclucks"... I wonder if the easiest solution is for stores to avoid ordering the single issues, and just wait for the trades?

    Trade paperbacks are usually announced six months in advance of publication, so there are very few "late" titles.

    Since the pages have all been produced and printed in the single issues, there's no delay caused by illness, workload, or talent.

    And... if there is a fustercluck in the storytelling, like we saw in Final Crisis with major scenes taking place in other series, then the publisher can correct that problem by including those issues in the collected edition.

    Of course, once digital downloads become the primary distribution channel for single issues, then publication date becomes secondary. A publisher can just send out emails to those who read the previous issue, or just publish a list of "this week's issues". Since pre-orders aren't a concern, publication dates can be fluid.

  6. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nawid A. View Post
    The dollar drop affected relatively few DC titles. Any store that runs into problems from a price drop likely isn't a very good one.

    I believe Morrison is the root of these delays. He had quite the workload. A extra sized mini, a bunch of side Bat stories (Return, 700-702), and Batman and Robin to write. And he had to launch Batman Inc in addition to finishing Joe the Barbarian and whatever else he's doing (Multiversity?).

    It's not quite Bendis' workload though, so I'm guessing nobody saw this coming, hence the rushed Jeanty issue which in retrospect, totally could have been a gorgeous Stewart book. Sometimes it happens.
    I don't know why you don't think Grant hadn't already scripted these stories well in advance, because that's usually the way he works.
    one of the highest principles of America is that we're a nation of people from different backgrounds living in equal dignity and mutual loyalty - Eboo Patel.

  7. #22
    New Member uthor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten Adair View Post
    Of course, once digital downloads become the primary distribution channel for single issues, then publication date becomes secondary. A publisher can just send out emails to those who read the previous issue, or just publish a list of "this week's issues". Since pre-orders aren't a concern, publication dates can be fluid.
    This is the reason I like ordering books online. I have a subscription set up and the books get to me when they're released. I don't stress over it being a week late or not because I don't have to pay attention to it and don't notice it. It also helps me mentally that I get, on average, a shipment every two weeks and it takes a week to get to me. I'm reading issues up to 3-4 weeks "late" usually and delays in publishing tend to be absorbed into the wait between shipments.

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