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  1. #1
    Mild-Mannered Reporter
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    Default CBR: CCI: Shazam! The Golden Age of the World's Mightiest Mortal

    Chip Kidd, Charles Kochman, and Michael Uslan discuss all things Shazam and Captain Marvel, and the release of a new book, at the Shazam! The Golden Age of the World's Mightiest Mortal panel


    Full article here.

  2. #2
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    Default Captain Marvel re discovered

    I'm not sure that the Captain Marvel costume was used in the Christopher Reeves, Superman film.

    I do believe it was used in the origin issue of the George Reeves Superman t.v. show. As was the costume from one of the Flash Gordon serials.

    I'd love to see this film made, and a newer bound version of the monster society of evil released. I fear that moments, now, seen as racist will prevent that book from being re published as was.

    That there was a Captain Marvel panel is a wonderful thing. Cap., when treated well, treats the reader well. He's a great character who's golden age incarnation deserves to be re discovered.

    Rose

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    A correction to this... the movie serial Captain Marvel costume is not seen on a Kryptonian in Superman The Movie (1978) but rather the episode "Superman On Earth" of The Adventures of Superman (1952). Other Kryptonians are wearing the costumes of (if I remember correctly) Captain America and Flash Gordon-- basically Western Costume cleared out its costume cupboard for this episode...

  4. #4
    Senior Member J.R. LeMar's Avatar
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    I would love to be able to read the whole Monster Society of Evil. I hope it gets published. I have the Shazam Archives books that DC published, and in the first one there's a scene where Billy rubs coal all over his face, and speaks in exaggerated "black dialect" ("Is I gon' see my mammy, sho 'nuff?") in order to sneak on board a boat. I wasn't offended when I first read it, I actually thought it was kinda funny to see how that kind of racist stuff got included in comics back then. I also later learned that Billy used to have a Black "manservant" named Steamboat, who also an Amos N Andy type of character. There's no need to hide from the past, we know society in general was much more racist back then.

  5. #5
    That guy from Puerto Rico Sijo's Avatar
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    What exactly is so racist in the Monster Society of Evil collection? Does it feature Japs-as-monsters character designs? (those were sadly common back then.)

    As for a possible Captain Marvel movie, it would have to *at least* be partially a comedy. It wouldn't work as a "Dark Knight" kinda film. Sure it can have vile villains and lots of action, but if they don't make use of elements like Billy being a child in a grown-up's body or Sivana being a cacklin' mad scientist, they would not be fair to its true legacy. (And yes I know about the stories that hinted that Marvel and Billy were separate personalities- but even then, Marvel was a particularly childlike hero, who ran away from being kissed by women and such.)

  6. #6
    Senior Member J.R. LeMar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sijo View Post
    What exactly is so racist in the Monster Society of Evil collection? Does it feature Japs-as-monsters character designs? (those were sadly common back then.
    Don't know about MOS, exactly. But I do recall seeing some panels of a Captain Marvel comics featuring evil Asian scientists "Smashi, Hashi, and PeeYu". But, as you say, that hardly makes the Captain Marvel comics unique for that time. Superman had comics during WWII telling people to "Slap a Jap."

    I'm guessing that maybe DC is worried that some folks will complain if they reprint the stories, making money of those racist depictions. But, by soliciting the book and then canceling it, they're drawing more attention to it. So now it will be a bigger deal if they ever republish it. They should have just put it out, and not said anything. Maybe give pledge to give 15% of the profits to some charity, if they're worried about backlash.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by GraemeB View Post
    A correction to this... the movie serial Captain Marvel costume is not seen on a Kryptonian in Superman The Movie (1978) but rather the episode "Superman On Earth" of The Adventures of Superman (1952). Other Kryptonians are wearing the costumes of (if I remember correctly) Captain America and Flash Gordon-- basically Western Costume cleared out its costume cupboard for this episode...
    Whoops, you're definitely right. This was the last panel of that day, and I must have rushed. I'm a horrible, horrible man. Sorry, and thanks for clarifying.



    The racism is a product of the time period. Like in old Captain America, Tin Tin, or The Spirit comics, African Americans and Japanese people are poorly depicted and are caricatures. And while most readers today are smart enough to know that it is an old and archaic (as well as just plain mean and wrong) depiction of a people, it's still a touchy subject. It'll come out eventually though, the regime change going on with Levitz stepping down and everything, just makes the MSoE storyline something they don't want to deal with until they're all settled.
    Last edited by Chris M Evans; 08-07-2010 at 10:08 AM.

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    Default Sad but true.

    Quote Originally Posted by J.R. LeMar View Post
    I would love to be able to read the whole Monster Society of Evil. I hope it gets published. I have the Shazam Archives books that DC published, and in the first one there's a scene where Billy rubs coal all over his face, and speaks in exaggerated "black dialect" ("Is I gon' see my mammy, sho 'nuff?") in order to sneak on board a boat. I wasn't offended when I first read it, I actually thought it was kinda funny to see how that kind of racist stuff got included in comics back then. I also later learned that Billy used to have a Black "manservant" named Steamboat, who also an Amos N Andy type of character. There's no need to hide from the past, we know society in general was much more racist back then.
    I also own that volume of reprints and I'm well aware that such depictions are to be expected when looking into a different time and era.
    I find them more bizarre than humorous, but at the same time I can't let myself become arrogant.
    And think that I haven't seen some of the same mentality in this day and age.
    But I do wish that the monster society of evil book finally gets published.
    Of course it would be nice if D.C. gave Captain Marvel to another company that would treat him right.
    They've abused him horribly over the last 3 and half decades.

  9. #9
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    Default Captain Marvel's shirt

    Actually it is in the two Superman movie serials "Superman" (1948) and "Atom Man vs. Superman" (1950) both starring Kirk Alyn as Superman one chapter (it's Chapter 1 in "Superman" and the exact same sequence is replayed in a middle chapter of "Atom Man vs. Superman) where a male Kryptonian in a scene with Superman's father Jor-L (it was probably spelled that way in the comics at the time!) wears a shirt previously worn by actor Tom Tyler when he starred in "The Adventures of Captain Marvel" serial in 1941. Noel Neill plays Lois Lane in both Superman serials and later reprised the role in the last 5 seasons of "The Adventures of Superman" television show starring George Reeves. Both Superman movie serials are available on DVD packaged together for less than $20. Good fun if you are in the right frame of mind and can get past a suddenly cheaply animated Superman appearing for the flying scenes!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by T.O.M. View Post
    I find them more bizarre than humorous
    Racist caricatures DO tend to make me laugh, but not for the same reason that readers of that period would have laughed -- I find the sheer wrongness, the utter backwardness, of the stereotyping to be funny. And, of course, tragic.

    Stuff like this can get awfully sticky; there's still an ongoing controversy on whether Song of the South should be released on DVD, and there are a dozen or so banned Bugs Bunny cartoons. WB has put out a fantastic set of Popeye DVD's, in their original, uncut form, "You're a Sap, Mr. Jap" and all, and has had great success and little controversy. I suspect part of this is the sensitivity with which they've handled it -- each disc starts with a disclaimer reminding the audience that these are products of their time -- and part of it is that Popeye isn't really thought of as a children's character anymore. The occasional TV movie aside, Popeye hasn't been a big part of the zeitgeist in decades, and at any rate anyone who puts on a Popeye DVD knows that he's going to smoke a pipe and punch people.

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