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  1. #31
    in a blaze of glory Midnightblue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GozertheGozarian View Post
    Finished up Equal Rites, getting ready to start Guards, Guards.
    I got Guards, Guards as Christmas gift. It my second favorite Discworld novel so far, after Mort.

  2. #32
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    With the help of an English translation, I just finished Jean Giraudoux's 1935 play La guerre de Troie n'aura pas lieu (The Trojan War Will Not Take Place). Definitely recommended, and not only for all the Trojan War buffs around here. Giraudoux uses the setting to make one of the more impressive anti-war statements I've come across. The main protagonist is Hector, who sees the war coming and is doing everything he can to prevent it, in the face of the blindness of most of the other (male) Trojan leaders, but with the support of the Trojan women, especially Andromaque, Cassandre, & Hecube. From the Greek side, Helene and Ulysse, as he's called here, have memorable scenes. Both the latter are receive very powerful portraits, highly ambivalent and unsettling. Hector is equally impressive, and much more sympathetic and human, as you'd expect from the premise. The whole thing is quite short, about 100 pp, and I think a few of the regulars here will find it worth more than a casual look.
    Last edited by berk; 01-30-2010 at 08:11 PM.

  3. #33
    Elder Member Karl O'Neill's Avatar
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    Just finished The 39 Steps By John Buchan.

    It's a fine spy thriller. One of the first of it's kind. But not the best.

    I'd say that if Buchan laid the foundations for spy fictions. Others perfected it. Or at least built the pillars on it.
    "You can't trust them as poets either. The true poet is anonymous, as to his habits, but these boys have to look, act, and apparently smell like poets"
    Flannery O'Connor on the beats.

  4. #34
    Modus omnibus in rebus Roquefort Raider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by berk View Post
    With the help of an English translation, I just finished Jean Giraudoux's 1935 play La guerre de Troie n'aura pas lieu (The Trojan War Will Not Take Place). Definitely recommended, and not only for all the Trojan War buffs around here. Giraudoux uses the setting to make one of the more impressive anti-war statements I've come across. The main protagonist is Hector, who sees the war coming and is doing everything he can to prevent it, in the face of the blindness of most of the other (male) Trojan leaders, but with the support of the Trojan women, especially Andromaque, Cassandre, & Hecube. From the Greek side, Helene and Ulysse, as he's called here, have memorable scenes. Both the latter are receive very powerful portraits, highly ambivalent and unsettling. Hector is equally impressive, and much more sympathetic and human, as you'd expect from the premise. The whole thing is quite short, about 100 pp, and I think a few of the regulars here will find it worth more than a casual look.
    Holy frijoles, that sounds brilliant! And a quick search shows that's it's available at our local library. Thanks for pointing out that book, berk!!!
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  5. #35
    Thief and Archer
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    I'm Dying Up Here, great book about the 70s LA comic scene, culminating with the Comedy Store strike. Letterman, Leno, Lewis, Dressen...They're all here. Highly recommended to anyone interested in the topic.
    "Ladies and gentlemen, tonight is not just another show for us. Tonight is arena football at its finest. Thank you" - David Letterman

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roquefort Raider View Post
    Holy frijoles, that sounds brilliant! And a quick search shows that's it's available at our local library. Thanks for pointing out that book, berk!!!
    I thought you and a few others here might be interested if you hadn't already read it. I first heard of it when looking at Jean Baudrillard's "The Gulf War Did Not Take Place," the title of which was apparently inspired by Giraudoux's drama. Still haven't gotten round to reading the Baudrillard book. Let us know what you think.

  7. #37
    Vintage `81 sHayden's Avatar
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    I just finished Sinner Take All the Tera Patrick (auto)biography.
    Interesting read. 100 times better than Jenna Jameson's book.

  8. #38
    CotM Member Puma's Avatar
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    Six Frigates, the origins of the U.S. Navy. Primarily focusing on events surrounding the War of 1812.
    What have I always believed? That, on the whole, and by and large, if a person lived properly, not according to what any priests said, but according to what seemed decent and honest inside, then it would, at the end, more or less, turn out ok.

    "In 1996, I was 36. And you're still a frothing moonbat." ~Paradox

  9. #39
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    Finished reading Cash: The Autobiography by Johnny Cash.

    This should more properly be called a memoir than an autobiography. It lacks the depth and gravitas that a true autobiography should have and is really a more of a reminiscence. That's not a bad thing. And there is some nice stuff in here, such as Cash talking about his friendship with Roy Orbison. But if you're looking for meat...you need to go somewhere else.

  10. #40
    New Member bantor2's Avatar
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    I'm currently reading Perfume: The Story of a Murderer

    It's really awesome. who would have guessed, reading about a disturbing kid and a greedy old man making perfume would be so fun

  11. #41
    Born under a wandrin Star Tobias March's Avatar
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    Another Kelly Link collection Pretty Monsters. I love her work, Magic: A User's Guide was a lovely book of short stories.

  12. #42
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    Finished up Grumbles From the Grave by Robert A. and Virginia Heinlein. The book is a collection of Heinlein's correspondence dealing with various aspects of his life and career. Clearly it is most interesting when dealing with his books and writing. At times I despaired of reading any more about home building and irrigation projects. But when it dealt with his books and his writing method (which was most of the book) it was very informative and interesting.

  13. #43
    internet pope howyadoin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slam_Bradley View Post
    Finished up Grumbles From the Grave by Robert A. and Virginia Heinlein. The book is a collection of Heinlein's correspondence dealing with various aspects of his life and career. Clearly it is most interesting when dealing with his books and writing. At times I despaired of reading any more about home building and irrigation projects. But when it dealt with his books and his writing method (which was most of the book) it was very informative and interesting.
    Okay, that's going on the to-buy list.
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  14. #44
    Elder Member Karl O'Neill's Avatar
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    I finished Carson McCuller's The Heart is a Lonely Hunter 2 nights ago.

    What a beautifully sad novel. Four disparate characters pivot around one deaf man by the name of John Singer, Who changes their lives just by being a great listener.

    But it appears that Singer is not the christ-like figure they all imagine him to be. He has his own personal struggles and issues to deal with.

    I couldn't believe his fate when I read it. It was heart-wrenching.

    Excellent book.
    Last edited by Karl O'Neill; 02-07-2010 at 09:26 AM.
    "You can't trust them as poets either. The true poet is anonymous, as to his habits, but these boys have to look, act, and apparently smell like poets"
    Flannery O'Connor on the beats.

  15. #45
    Born under a wandrin Star Tobias March's Avatar
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    Roadside Picnic by the Strugatsky brothers. Saw the film Stalker years ago. Excellent book.

    The source of the title is a brilliant moment.

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