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  1. #1981
    Senior Member Castel's Avatar
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    Some Albert Camus.

    The Myth of Sisyphus and The First Man.

  2. #1982

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    The Republic of Thieves by Scott Lynch.

  3. #1983
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    Recent re-read of A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs. And what I said on Goodreads...

    "There are some books that instantly whisk you off to another time and another place. This is one of those books. And no, I don't mean I'm whisked off to a mythical Mars populated by brave warriors, beautiful women, green monsters and white apes. I'm whisked off to junior high...maybe a boring math class...maybe lunch time and a group of gangly boys talking about John Carter, Dejah Thoris, Tars Tarkas and their prospects of survival on Barsoom.

    Some books are classics because of their literary merit as determined by those who profess to study literary merit. Some are classics because they're read and enjoyed by generation after generation tapping in to something that runs through the core of their audience. Some are classics because you find them at the right time and they live with you, forever etched in to your psyche. A Princess of Mars hits those last two criteria...and I'm a trembling mass of indifference as to the first.

    I could talk at length about the historic significance of this book. It is the quintessential Planetary Romance. Its influence is pervasive across science fiction, pulp and fantasy writing. Ray Bradbury, Carl Sagan, Jane Goodall, Steven Spielberg, Leigh Brackett, George Lucas and James Cameron have all cited Burroughs as influences on their work.

    It really doesn't matter if the characters are paper thin. It doesn't matter if they're idealized to the point of absurdity. They matter. And they've mattered for 100 years. They matter because they took a number of boys away from the farmlands of Idaho and put them on Mars. And they matter because for a couple of hours a man pushing middle-age hard can be a schoolboy again."

  4. #1984
    whatever Jodoc's Avatar
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    Ghosts Know by Ramsey Campbell

    A radio talk show host has a confrontation w/a supposed psychic medium he believes to be a fraud. A young girl disappears, and her family brings the medium in to help. He leads the police to the radio host as a suspect. A really good read. The protagonist is well done, w/personal issues and messed-up relationships, there's suspense as I was never sure where he was headed, tho I had a suspicion (which turned out to be wrong). And there is one scene of violence which is really well handled, scary and tense and disturbing.
    But there is this one reveal at the end which bothers me. It doesn't help resolve the plot, and it seems to fly in the face of where I thought we were headed. The conflict between the host and the psychic isn't resolved, physically, tho perhaps it is in a larger sense. I don't know; certainly not the easy, all-wrapped-up-in-a-neat-bow ending you might expect.
    Oh, and it's not horror. Not that I minded.
    Last edited by Jodoc; 11-19-2013 at 08:21 PM.
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  5. #1985
    Soul Gem Resident adam_warlock_2099's Avatar
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    Still reading The Restless Hands by Bruno Fischer. Really enjoying it. A crime/drama type story of a gal and three guys that she has been romantic with at one time or another is attacked in the same way that her sister was killed one year previous to the time line of the book. The PI in the story is a reoccurring character in four other of Fischer's novels. He's an appealing enough character (reminds me somewhat of Felix Gomez, in Mario Acevedo's books) to at least search out the other books that he appears in. From this first read Fischer is a competent writer with a knack for this subject.
    "To alcohol, the cause of and solution to all of life's problems." -- Homer Simpson
    "You get what everyone gets. You get a lifetime." -- Death (Sandman)

  6. #1986
    Senior Member Castel's Avatar
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    La Sorcière (translated in "Satanism and Witchcraft" i believe) by Jules Michelet.

    Very funny and interesting book.

  7. #1987
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    Quote Originally Posted by Castel View Post
    La Sorcière (translated in "Satanism and Witchcraft" i believe) by Jules Michelet.

    Very funny and interesting book.
    I just read that in English a couple months or so back. My edition was given the title Witchcraft, Sorcery, And Superstition, but I've seen it called different things in English. Very interesting read, especially impressive considering when it was written (early 1860s).

  8. #1988
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slam_Bradley View Post
    Recent re-read of A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs. And what I said on Goodreads...

    "There are some books that instantly whisk you off to another time and another place. This is one of those books. And no, I don't mean I'm whisked off to a mythical Mars populated by brave warriors, beautiful women, green monsters and white apes. I'm whisked off to junior high...maybe a boring math class...maybe lunch time and a group of gangly boys talking about John Carter, Dejah Thoris, Tars Tarkas and their prospects of survival on Barsoom.

    Some books are classics because of their literary merit as determined by those who profess to study literary merit. Some are classics because they're read and enjoyed by generation after generation tapping in to something that runs through the core of their audience. Some are classics because you find them at the right time and they live with you, forever etched in to your psyche. A Princess of Mars hits those last two criteria...and I'm a trembling mass of indifference as to the first.

    I could talk at length about the historic significance of this book. It is the quintessential Planetary Romance. Its influence is pervasive across science fiction, pulp and fantasy writing. Ray Bradbury, Carl Sagan, Jane Goodall, Steven Spielberg, Leigh Brackett, George Lucas and James Cameron have all cited Burroughs as influences on their work.

    It really doesn't matter if the characters are paper thin. It doesn't matter if they're idealized to the point of absurdity. They matter. And they've mattered for 100 years. They matter because they took a number of boys away from the farmlands of Idaho and put them on Mars. And they matter because for a couple of hours a man pushing middle-age hard can be a schoolboy again."
    Having recently reread the first three Mars novels, I'd agree on the salient points. I did think PRINCESS was a little too much in the Jules Verne mold, while in GODS ERB just goes off into a wild mythopoeic romp.

  9. #1989
    Senior Member Moriarty's Avatar
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    The Cuckoo's Calling by Robert Galbraith (J. K. Rowling)

  10. #1990
    Senior Member Wildfire2099's Avatar
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    New Earth by Ben Bova

    This is the latest of the 'Grand Tour' series, and it was really good. I was wondering what he was going to do when he ran out of planets, so this one jumped out at me (even though I haven't read the last couple). I'd highly recommend it if you like hard sci fi.. it's a bit of a set up book, but it's a GREAT set up, and tell a good (if not terribly unique) story along the way.
    Like Kyle Rayner? Check out my classic review thread:

    http://forums.comicbookresources.com...s-by-Wildfire)

  11. #1991
    Senior Member Moriarty's Avatar
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    The Killer Inside me by Jim Thompson

  12. #1992
    RIP Ronnie James Dio Deathstroke's Avatar
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    I finished reading the Janet Evanovich book Notorious Nineteen yesterday.
    I'm on Twitter

    "I can't complain. I got to be Jim Morrison for the first half of my life, and Ward Cleaver for the second half." - Warren Zevon.

  13. #1993
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    Drakenfeld by Mark Charan Newton and Promise of Blood by Brian McClellan are middling fantasy novels that, frankly, bored the crap out of me. The former is an attempt at a murder mystery thriller with absolutely no urgency in a generic, quasi-Roman fantasy setting. The latter is one of those books where the plot and world-building are immaculately constructed, and everything else is negligible. They're both meant to kick off larger series, but I don't see myself continuing with either.

    I also read The Poisoner's Handbook by Deborah Blum, and it's sublime. It's an account of the early days of forensic science, seen through the lens of New York City in the early 1900s. The book is a fantastic mix of true crime, history, and popular science writing.
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  14. #1994
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    'Rommel?' 'Gunner Who?': A Confrontation in the Desert by Spike Milligen

    A re-read of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.

  15. #1995
    Junior Member zbjj's Avatar
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    At the moment I'm reading Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. I never read it in high school, found it for a quarter in an indoor flea market and thought, "Why not?" I'm also making my way through an anthology of American crime fiction. So far I've read "The Scorched Face" by Dashiell Hammett, "Round Trip" by W. R. Burnett and "Mistral" by Raoul Whitfield. I don't know why I don't read these type of stories more often as I really enjoy them. I've got a Raymond Chandler omnibus sitting on my shelf that I may need to crack open soon...

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