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  1. #1951
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roquefort Raider View Post
    I must say I spent many more hours admiring the Jim Bama covers than reading the actual books. I'm not sure Doc was actually supposed to look like that, but man... he struck an imposing figure.
    I could have written these exact words myself. I did read a couple of the Bantam paperbacks back in the 70s and a more recent reprint of the very first Doc Savage book a couple years ago. But most of my knowledge probably comes from the black and white Marvel magazine from the 70s. I plan to read more of the originals in the future as I've always liked the whole character concept.

  2. #1952
    RIP Ronnie James Dio Deathstroke's Avatar
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    I finished the Alex Marwood novel The Wicked Girls today. Really good dark twisty thriller.
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    "I can't complain. I got to be Jim Morrison for the first half of my life, and Ward Cleaver for the second half." - Warren Zevon.

  3. #1953
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep by Philip K. Dick.

    This was a reread but it had been probably 25 years since I'd last read it and I was frankly having a hard time remembering what was "Androids" and what was "Blade Runner." I really had forgotten how much different the two are. Thematically this hits most of the Dick buttons, the nature of humanity, the nature of reality religious themes. I'm still cogitating on on Mercer's manifestation to Deckard toward the end and the throwing of the rock, a whole lot of stuff to think about there.

    Great book. And a very glad reread.

  4. #1954
    whatever Jodoc's Avatar
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    Archie Meets Nero Wolfe by Richard Goldsborough

    I've liked what I've read of Goldsborough's Nero Wolfe, but I'm not in love w/them. And this one didn't change my mind. It's well done, it captures the feel of Archie and Wolfe, but the writing doesn't have the kick of Rex Stout's originals. Plus, there's no big dramatic moment to mark the beginning of their relationship. Archie is brought in on one of Wolfe's cases, as one of a half dozen detectives, he does a good job, Wolfe has an opening and offers it to him. No drama, no personal connection between them; Wolfe is just hiring somebody, and Archie is just taking another job. Obviously, it turns into more later, but there's no sign of that here. Plus, Archie is way too young and inexperienced here; seems like he should have been more seasoned on his own before joining Wolfe. A good book, but if you're going to do a key moment like this, there should be more to it.
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  5. #1955
    *choke* Dan B. in the Underworld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slam_Bradley View Post
    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep by Philip K. Dick.

    This was a reread but it had been probably 25 years since I'd last read it and I was frankly having a hard time remembering what was "Androids" and what was "Blade Runner." I really had forgotten how much different the two are. Thematically this hits most of the Dick buttons, the nature of humanity, the nature of reality religious themes. I'm still cogitating on on Mercer's manifestation to Deckard toward the end and the throwing of the rock, a whole lot of stuff to think about there.

    Great book. And a very glad reread.
    I've read this at least 3 times (along with probably a good one-third of PKD's novels; the others I've almost all read at least twice, except for the last couple of posthumously published mainstream novels) & quite possibly 4. It's been nearly a quarter-century, though, since the last time for me, too. I need to remedy that.
    I tend to split superhero comics fans into "People who like Krypto" and "People who don't like Krypto."
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  6. #1956
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slam_Bradley View Post
    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep by Philip K. Dick.

    This was a reread but it had been probably 25 years since I'd last read it and I was frankly having a hard time remembering what was "Androids" and what was "Blade Runner." I really had forgotten how much different the two are. Thematically this hits most of the Dick buttons, the nature of humanity, the nature of reality religious themes. I'm still cogitating on on Mercer's manifestation to Deckard toward the end and the throwing of the rock, a whole lot of stuff to think about there.

    Great book. And a very glad reread.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan B. in the Underworld View Post
    I've read this at least 3 times (along with probably a good one-third of PKD's novels; the others I've almost all read at least twice, except for the last couple of posthumously published mainstream novels) & quite possibly 4. It's been nearly a quarter-century, though, since the last time for me, too. I need to remedy that.
    My plan is to re-read all my favourite PKD books plus a selection of the ones I haven't yet read, all in chronological order - though when I'll finally get around to this, heaven only knows. This was an intention I'd already formed some time ago, but there's an additonal motive now: having recently picked up a copy of the massive Exegesis of Philip K. Dick, and just casually leafing through it once or twice, I realise I'll want to re-familarise myself with his fiction before embarking on the Exegesis itself: he began keeping the notes that comprise what's been collected and published under that title in 1974 or thereabouts, and they reference his own previous work quite a bit. He began to see his fiction (and a core ten of the novels in particular) as a foreshadowing of or an advance commentary on the "2-3-74" event that took place in that year and which became an obsession for him through the rest of his life.
    Last edited by berk; 10-10-2013 at 06:48 AM.

  7. #1957
    whatever Jodoc's Avatar
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    Star Trek - Department of Temporal Investigations - Forgotten History by Christopher L. Bennett

    While the book does have its own story to tell, it's also about tying together virtually every time travel episode of ST:TOS, the animated series, the movies and some of the previous novels. So there are a lot of references to other works, and a lot of time spent explaining things. Like where the Earth-like world of the Onlies from Miri came from, or why Spock went back to Vulcan for the Kho-li-nar discipline, or what got him thinking about reunifying Vulcans and Romulans. Or why the Enterprise was involved in so many time travel incidents; then, since that explanation involves the ship herself, how did they work that time trip in The Voyage Home? Or why Kirk is considered such a dangerous rebel by future DTI agents, how that rep came about, and how he feels about it when confronted by it.
    Get the idea? If you know your original Trek backwards and forwards, this could be a terrific fill-in-the-blanks nerdgasm of a book. If not, it could leave you cold, or lost.
    Me? I didn't get all the references, but hell, I loved the book. I remember not being too impressed w/Bennett's first book, Ex Machina, but this book was better, moving right along, w/the characters sounding right and a lot going on. (Hell, Spock even goes to bed w/his old fiance T'Pring. Sort of.) Bottom line, good read.
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  8. #1958
    RIP Ronnie James Dio Deathstroke's Avatar
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    I finished the David Baldacci thriller The Hit yesterday.
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  9. #1959
    Senior Member Castel's Avatar
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    Dune, Messiah of Dune and Children of Dune. (re-reading of course)

    Dune : a masterpiece. The balance between politics, philosophy, spirituality and cheer epicness is near perfect.

    MoD : basically it's just Paul talking, thinking and being sad. (he has some reasons for though) If i do think that it could make a great play, as a book it's not always all that fascinating to read. But i like it, the whole Hayt thing was a nice thing to pull and the end is great. It would have made a superb ending to this saga.

    CoD : not a big fan of that one. It's kind of weakly structured, it's a real struggle to find any interesting or even just likable characters (even the old ones like Stilgar or Duncan are dull) and the story didn't captivate me at all. You can easily tell that a long time passed between the writting of MoD and CoD. I think that at this point Frank Herbert's vision and understanding of his old characters were quite different than when he wrote the previous books.
    Last edited by Castel; 10-16-2013 at 02:15 AM.

  10. #1960
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    Johnny Alucard by Kim Newman.

    Newman combines some previously published Anno Dracula stories with some new stuff to bring the AD-verse in to the 1970s and beyond. Most fun book I've read all year.

  11. #1961
    Junior Member The Green Condom's Avatar
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    Unseen Academicals by Terry Pratchett.

    The first time i read this book some months ago i didn't enjoy it very much for being honest. But i wanted to give it a second try anyway and well, better, definitely better this time.

    Not a book i would advice a new Pratchett reader to start with but it has qualities. And definitely some depth.

  12. #1962
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    In a Lonely Place by Dorothy B. Hughes.

    I'm not sure if this was a case of overblown expectations or coming too late to an early genre work, but for whatever reason, I didn't like this one as much as I'd hoped. This is easily Hughes' most famous work and has been favorably compared to Chandler. But the oomph of the writing simply wasn't there to put this in the upper echelon of literary noir. And while this is a pretty early example of the Very Bad protagonist, having read Thompson, Highsmith and a host of others, that was less novel than it would have been in 1947.

    There are things to like. Hughes' use of third person storytelling is interesting and works fairly well. Though we never get a particularly good look at Dix Steele. And there really are no particularly compelling characters in the book. I found myself not really caring what happened because I just wasn't that interested in the characters.

    Disappointing.

  13. #1963

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slam_Bradley View Post
    In a Lonely Place by Dorothy B. Hughes.

    I'm not sure if this was a case of overblown expectations or coming too late to an early genre work, but for whatever reason, I didn't like this one as much as I'd hoped. This is easily Hughes' most famous work and has been favorably compared to Chandler. But the oomph of the writing simply wasn't there to put this in the upper echelon of literary noir. And while this is a pretty early example of the Very Bad protagonist, having read Thompson, Highsmith and a host of others, that was less novel than it would have been in 1947.

    There are things to like. Hughes' use of third person storytelling is interesting and works fairly well. Though we never get a particularly good look at Dix Steele. And there really are no particularly compelling characters in the book. I found myself not really caring what happened because I just wasn't that interested in the characters.

    Disappointing.
    I've never read the book, but it made one helluva movie, directed by Nick Ray. Starring Humphrey Bogart and Gloria Grahame--it's a grown up movie about grown up people with grown up problems--unlike most modern movies. An underappreciated gem.
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  14. #1964
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by An Ear In The Fireplace View Post
    I've never read the book, but it made one helluva movie, directed by Nick Ray. Starring Humphrey Bogart and Gloria Grahame--it's a grown up movie about grown up people with grown up problems--unlike most modern movies. An underappreciated gem.
    It is a very good film. But it bears little resemblance to the book.

  15. #1965
    Junior Member The Green Condom's Avatar
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    The Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett.

    A quite funny and surprisingly deep book.

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